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Company D of the 43rd BATTALION VIRGINIA CAVALRY
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA

Confederate States of America

 

 

 


"Mosby's Confederacy" geographically defined as running from Snickersville, along the Blue Ridge Mountains to Linden; thence to Salem (now called Marshall); to The Plains; thence along the Bull Run Mountains to Aldie; and thence along the turnpike to the place of beginning, Snickersville. Beginning June 22nd, 1864, Mosby allowed no member to leave these bounds without permission Roll call was kept at each meeting, and any man absent for two successive meetings, without satisfactory reason, was to be sent back to the regular service.


COMPANY D, organized Monday, March 28th, 1864, at Paris, Virginia


Captain Richard Paul Montjoy (killed)

Standing by Mosby's sole artillery piece until surrounded, he was captured on May 30, 1863. The courageous Montjoy was again wounded on the morning of June 22, 1863, the eastern slope of the Bull Run Mountains, near Dr. Ewell's farm, having finger shot off. He was from Mississippi and entered the Confederate Army as a private in an infantry regiment from his native state, but he afterwards obtained a transfer to Mosby's command. Captain Montjoy was killed by the Loudoun Rangers on Sunday, November 27th, 1864, near Goresville, Loudoun County, VA. While leading his men in pursuit of the enemy, he was killed by a chance shot fired by one of the fugitives near the "Burnt Chimneys." One of the Federals, without even looking behind, put his pistol over his shoulder and fired, the ball striking Montjoy in the head. He was a brave and dashing young officer. He was buried in the cemetery at Warrenton.

Capt Richard Paul Montjoy Birth: Mar. 15, 1842 Death: Nov. 27, 1864 "In memory of R.P. Montjoy Captain of Company D 43rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry Mosby's Men Born March 15, 1842 Killed Nov. 27, 1864 in action near Goresville Loundon County Virginia." He died too early for liberty and his country's cause but not too early for his own fame" from Col. Mosby's General Order on Capt. Montjoy's death Dec. 3 1864, erected by his comrades September 1907" Burial: Warrenton Cemetery Warrenton Fauquier County Virginia, USA

Click here to see Captain Montjoy's final resting place!

Captain Alfred Glascock

Alfred was from Fauquier County and first entered the army as a private. He was promoted to a lieutenant in Captain (afterwards General) Turner Ashby's Cavalry Command. After the death of Ashby he joined Mosby's battalion, serving gallantly. Alfred was wounded at Seneca, Maryland, on June 10, 1863.

1st Lieutenant Charles E. Grogan

Charles was born in Clarke County, Virginia, but made his home in Maryland. In July, 1861, he crossed the Potomac into Virginia and enlisted in Captain William H. Murray's Company, 1st Maryland Regiment, under Colonel, afterwards General George H. Stewart. He was first under fire at the Battle of Bull Run. Later he was an aid to General I.R. Trimble, and received his first wound at Chancellorsville, where he was officially commended for conspicuous service by General R. E. Colston, who in that battle commanded General Trimble's Division, Trimble at the time being disabled from a wound received at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run. In the battle at Gettysburg, Grogan was twice wounded while acting as aid to General Trimble. When Lee fell back he was left wounded in a hospital near Gettysburg, and after some weeks was sent with Trimble and other prisoners, first to Fort McHenry and thence to Johnson's Island on Lake Erie, from which place he made his escape, and after a long and tedious journey he succeeded in reaching Virginia, whereupon he joined Mosby.

2nd Lieutenant Matthew Ferrell Magner

Matthew Ferrell Magner enlisted in 1861 and served in Company B, 11th Mississippi Infantry; was wounded at the Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861, while serving with Co. D, 1st Virginia Cavalry. After joining Mosby's Rangers, he participated in numerous skirmishes, fights, and scouts from April, 1863 until the end of hostilities. Lieutenant Magner was captured on July 18, 1864, and was threatened with being "hung" in the streets of Paris for being a Mosby Ranger. He escaped Union imprisonment at Harpers Ferry on August 6, 1864, dislocating his shoulder in the process while forced to swim the Shenandoah River for his freedom. He also sustained frost bite on his feet during the January 18, 1865 raid on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad two miles south of Duffields Station, Jefferson County, (West) Virginia. Mr. Magner was paroled on May 7, 1865 at Winchester, Va, at the age of 25; (his parole papers describe him at 5'9" with fair complexion, blue eyes and black hair. He was wounded during the Gettysburg campaign, but survived the war and returned to Mississippi, only to die a short time later in 1866 of wounds and yellow fever while employed with a shipping company at Delta, Mississippi. (God rest his soul) The Magner family left Ireland in 1849 and arrived in Nicollet County, Minnesota by 1852. (Matthew was born at Castletown Roach, County Cork, Ireland.) (The Lambert/Magner farms are still being operated by Lamberts to this day.) There is an article on the two Magner brothers, James and Matthew - both of whom fought in the Civil War - in the July-August 1992 of Military Image. The article is entitled, "The Gray and the Blue - A collection of Vignettes from the Brother's War". Matthew's brother, James Magner was Captain of Company I, 28th Massachusetts Infantry - The Irish Brigade.
(A very special thank you to Dave Lambert, who can claim that Lieutenant Matthew Magner was a brother of his great grandmother Mary Magner.) Thanks, Dave for supplying me with much of the above information).

3rd Lieutenant William H. Trunnell, (killed)

William hailed from Maryland. He was killed along with a man named Coyle of the 12th Virginia Cavalry, on the night of March 27th, 1864, while on a scout in the Shenandoah Valley, near Bunker Hill, caught in an ambush by a party of Federal soldiers.

3rd Lieutenant David S. Briscoe (commanding at the end of hostilities)

After the war, he resided at Baltimore, Maryland where he practiced as an attorney at law.


COMPANY D Privates


Adie, Lewis Benjamin (killed)

Lewis, a gallant young soldier from Leesburg, was killed on Friday evening, August 12th, 1864 as Mosby's men fought a Yankee Cavalry party who sought refuge in a brick church in the suburbs of Berryville. After Mosby brought up their howitzer, the Federals were forced to retire behind a brick wall and Lewis was shot down as he charged them.

Aldridge, Joseph West

He was born May 15, 1846, and had light complexion, brown hair and blue eyes. After the war, he resided in Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, moving to Westminster, Maryland. Joseph died April 18th, 1919 and is buried at Saint Anne's Cemetery, Annapolis, Maryland. (picture-click here)

Anderson, Boswell P.

After the war, he resided in Colorado Springs, Colorado as the resident physician.

Anderson, Thomas E. (killed-executed)

Born September 9th, 1834, Thomas was one of the six Mosby's Men captured after the attack on Merritt's Cavalry Division's Reserve Brigade near Chester Gap. Although it cannot be directly confirmed on whose order, never the less, he was executed at Front Royal (supposedly by orders of General George Custer) on Friday, September 23rd, 1864. Thomas was taken out and shot. He is buried in the Anderson Family Cemetery, Markham, Virginia. (picture-click here)

Atkins, John (killed)

He was mortally wounded on Saturday, October 29th, 1864 in the fight near Upperville with the 8th Illinois Cavalry. John was an Irish gentleman, who, having heard of Mosby's exploits, left home and country to join his fortune with Mosby's. He was brave, generous, of good education, agreeable in his manner, and had in the short time he was with Mosby made many friends. The poor fellow, he suffered greatly, but when death came it was not the grim monster usually pictured, but a kindly spirit, which transported him in his last moments from scenes of blood and carnage back to home and friends, and as he murmured faintly the words, "Oh, my poor mother!" he sank to rest. He was buried in the little cemetery at Paris, Virginia.

Baker, T. R.

After the war, he resided in Washington, D.C.

Beal, Joseph R.

After the war, he operated a general store at Roanoke, Virginia.

Best, Richard

After the war, he resided at Verdon, Virginia.

Binford, Wirt M. (killed)

Wirt was killed on Tuesday, March 21st, 1865, as Mosby's men contested the Yankee Cavalry near Hamilton, Virginia. The courageous Wirt was a youth, but little over 17 years of age. His body was taken to Richmond after the war and is now buried in the Hollywood Cemetery. His grave is begging for you to go find it. Please do.

Bispham, Stacy B.

After the war, Stacy moved to New York City, where he was employed at Russell and Erwin Manufacturing Company.

Bolling, Bartlett

After the war, he resided at Keswick, Virginia.

Bolling, John

John, along with his brother, Bartlett, were captured at their father's residence Saturday, February 20th, 1864, by Cole's 2nd Battalion Maryland Cavalry. He was again captured on March 9th, 1864, when Quartermaster James John Bolling, and Major Hibbs, who were pressing corn and bacon in Loudoun, were seized by Yankees and taken across the Potomac to Berlin.

Braxton, William Armstead (killed)

William, of King William County, Virginia, was mortally wounded during the retreat of Mosby's men on November 16th, 1864, after being attacked by Captain Blazer's Independent Scouts about 2 miles from Berry's Ferry, near the residence of Mr. Frank Whiting. He was taken to the Vineyard where he died.

Bredell, Edward (killed)

Edward was killed on November 16th, 1864, when Mosby's men were attacked by Captain Blazer's Independent Scouts about 2 miles from Berry's Ferry, near the residence of Mr. Frank Whiting. Bredell was from St. Louis, Missouri, and although he had been a lieutenant in the regular service, he was serving as a private in Company D at the time of his demise. He was buried at midnight in a sand shoal of the Shenandoah, and his remains were afterwards removed to a churchyard near Piedmont.

Love, Thomas R.

He was captured on December 21st, 1864, after the advancing Yankee Cavalry left Rectortown, moved toward Middleburg, stopping at Mr. Lake's residence, where Colonel Mosby was just seriously shot, picking up Thomas as a prisioner there.

Brock, Harry

After the war, he worked for a commercial agency in New York City, New York.

Brooke, William T.

After the war, he resided at Norfolk, Virginia.

Bryan, Joseph

After the war, Joseph became the President of the Richmond Times newspaper, also residing in the Capital of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia.

Carrington, Luther (killed).

He was killed by the 8th Illinois Cavalry in the fight near Upperville, Saturday, October 29th, 1864.

Carter, Thomas (killed)

Carter was one of the six Mosby's Men executed at Front Royal by orders of General George Custer on Friday, September 23rd, 1864. He was taken out and executed by hanging.

Chamblin H. Clay

After the war, he resided at Richmond, Virginia.

Chancellor, James M.

He was captured by the 8th Illinois Cavalry in the fight near Upperville, Saturday, October 29th, 1864. After the war, he resided at Roanoke, Virginia.

Chew, John A.

After the war, John moved to Charlestown, West Virginia.

Chew, Robert

Robert enlisted in Company D, Mosby's command, in April, 1864. He was 17 years of age at the time. He was badly wounded on Christmas Eve, 1864, while scouting with J. West Albridge near Point of Rocks. He rode 15 miles after being wounded.

After the war, Robert moved along with his brother, John, to Charlestown, West Virginia.

Chilton, James V.

After the war, he resided at Warrenton, Virginia, where he made a living selling stationery.

Christian, E. W.

After the war, he moved to Mobile, Alabama.

Core, John H.

After the war, John owned and operated the John H. Core and Company importers, manufacturers and packers' agent, Norfolk, Virginia.

Darneille, Philip A.

After the war, Philip moved to Washington, D.C.

Dear, Charles H.

While on a raid in the Shenandoah Valley, near Newtown, Charles was wounded, receiving a ball in his side on May 9th, 1864.

After the war, he was employed by the Internal Revenue Service, at Washington, Rappahannock County, Virginia.

Dear, H. Clay

He was initially refused entry in Company D because of his age (he was but a school boy), but he was finally given permission to go with the company, which he did until the end of hostilities. Through the kindness of the men, he was given a place behind his big cousin, Charlie Dear, who always brought him in the second or third "fours" in time of danger.

After the war, he moved to West Superior, Wisconsin.

Dear, J. William

William was captured in Loudoun County, February, 1865, near his home in the vicinity of Mount Gilead, and was ordered sent to Fort McHenry by General Philip Sheridan, USA, and was not exchanged/released until after the end of the war. Perhaps this internment saved his life from the battlefield.

Eastham, Robert W. ("Bob Ridley")

After the war, he resided at Davis, West Virginia.

Flack, ? (killed)

Mr. Flack was killed on Friday, April 29th, 1864, when Federal Cavalry entered Leesburg; there were about a dozen of Mosby's men in town. A number were in and around the hotel, with their horses standing in the street. The Yankees were within 200 yards of the hotel when they were first noticed by men on the veranda. Flack rushed to his horse, mounted and dashed off, with the enemy in hot pursuit. He was shot to death on the edge of town. A few days after his death his remains were taken to his home in Baltimore by his brother.

Gibson, Henry C.

After the war, he resided at Waterford, Virginia.

Gill, George Murray

He was mortally wounded on March 30th, 1865, by the 13th Massachusetts Cavalry at a stable near Berryville where he was shot dead. George was from Baltimore, who had entered the Confederate Army in the early part of the war and had served both in the infantry and cavalry before his transfer to Mosby's command, where he made many friends. After receiving his mortal wound he tried to reach his friends in Fauquier County, but was obliged to stop at a house on the road, where he died a couple of days later.

Gill, John

After the war, John owned and operated the Gill and Fisher Grain Shippers, Baltimore, Maryland.

Here's some additional information submitted to me for use on my website by Dave Gaddy. -- thanks Dave!

Ron, Per "Come Retribution: the Confederate Secret Service and the Assassination of Lincoln," Captain Jacob Hite Manning was Longstreet's Cheif Signal Officer, relieved per Gen R.E. Lee and sent to report to Mosby (who, not being a general officer, was unusual recipient, although this was "home turf" for Manning, who was from Loudoun county). Signal Sergeant John Gill (Marylander) had left the sig corps and joined Mosby due to death of Gill's brother. John Stevens Mason also was a signal officer, who resigned to enter the CS Navy, and then resigned from there--presumably the same man. All three end up in Co. D. Manning had set up a sig station in Front Royal, communicating with Signal Knob, overlooking Strasburg. Sig Knob was an observation post and northernmost of CS sig stas running south along the Mass. Mt. to link with telegraph line into Richmond. Late author, Brig Gen William A.Tidwell (Come Retribution) was working on a fictional account about this at time of his death, speculating that this was an emergency link for Mosby's "back door.") The concidence (?) of finding three of these experienced sig corps guys in one unit of the 43rd raised curiosity in my mind. Easy to say that Manning was "let go" and returned to home area, where he jined up as a private, but IG report of early '65 still IDs him as there by order of Gen RE Lee. Williamson says nil about him, although seems to call him "Captain" as a nickname and places him on roster with privates (at age 37-38). Sorta interesting to me. If you have any thoughts on the matter, I'd love to hear them. Best regards, Dave Gaddy

Gipson, Edwin

Edwin Gibson was a promising young attorney who at the close of the war, having earned the reputation of a good soldier, settled down to the quiet practice of his profession. He was bitten by a rattlesnake on his farm in 1876, and soon afterwards died from the snake poison's effect.

Goldsborough, Charles

After the war, Charles was involved in the "Uhlman and Goldsborough Company," Baltimore, Maryland.

Grayson, Robert

Griffin, Joseph. Joseph was wounded on Tuesday, March 21st, 1865, as Mosby's men contested the Yankee Cavalry near Hamilton, Virginia. Mosby drew off his men and halted in a field in full view of the Federal Cavalry. The men cheered, waved their hats, and used every means to draw the cavalry away from the infantry. Some of Mosby's men, venturing too close to the enemy's lines were fired on, and Joseph Griffin was wounded and his horse killed. He attempted to gain the shelter of the woods, but was pursued and captured.

After the war, he resided at Charlottesville, Virginia.

Harris, H. G.

After the war, he resided at Bluefield, West Virginia.

Heiskell, James Monroe

After the war, he worked as a U.S. Revenue Service employee.

Jarvis, B. F.

After the war, he resided at Scottsville, Virginia.

Jones, Philip (killed)

Jones was one of the six Mosby's Men executed at Front Royal by orders of General George Custer on Friday, September 23rd, 1864. Jones was taken out and shot.

Jones, Zach F.

After the war, Zach was a travelling salesman, wiping his shoes off on his doormat at Scottsville, Virginia.

Jordan, H. C.

After the war, he resided at Richmond, Virginia.

Kane, James C.

After the war, he and his brother, John C., went west, far away from the devastation in the East; James went on to work for the Pacific Gas Improvement Company, San Francisco, California.

Kane, John C.

After the war, John left his home behind, and travelled with his brother out west; John ended up becoming Vice President of the Silverton Deep Mining and Tunnel Company, Silverton, Colorado.

Keblinger, Wilber

After the war, he resided at Charlottesville, Virginia.

Keith, James (killed)

James was killed on Tuesday, March 21st, 1865, as Mosby's men contested the Yankee Cavalry near Hamilton, Virginia. The war so close to ending, yet mortal shells still being fired at the opposing sides.

Kenny, William Disen

William was from Fauquier County, Va and was paroled April 25, 1865 at the age of 22, at Winchester, Va. He parole card indicates he was 5'8" with fair complexion, blue eyes and light (fair) hair.

Larrabee, Harrison C.

After the war, he resided at Baltimore, Maryland.

Leache, Ninian Willet

Ninian Willet Leache was born either July 3rd, 1847 or 1849 at "Wood Park" near Warrenton, Va, the son of Dr. Jesse Willet Leach and Jane Roberts Hunton. He was paroled April 28th, 1865 at Winchester, Va at the age of 16, with dark complexion, dark hair and dark eyes. In 1872, he married Lavona Raines. At one time, he resided at Front Royal, was employed with the Radford Iron Works, Pulaski County,Va. And After the war, he resided at Baltimore, Maryland. He was a member of the James Breathed Camp, United Confederate Veterans (UCV). He died June 18th, 1920. [Family tradition says that Ninnian was in a boarding school and ran away several times trying to join the army, but was rejected as too young; finally Mosby agreed to take him on. The tradition also says that he was on a raid into Maryland.] Thanks to a relative, Gene (Eugene Hunton Leache) for passing this information on to my for use on my website and future book.

Love, Lucian (killed)

Lucian was one of the six Mosby's Men executed at Front Royal by orders of General George Custer on Friday, September 23rd, 1864. Overby and Love, were hung to a tree in sight of the town of Front Royal, and a paper pinned on the breast of one read: "Such is the fate of all of Mosby's gang."

McCobb, ? (killed)

Mr. McCobb, from Baltimore, was killed Saturday, February 20th, 1864, by Cole's 2nd Battalion Maryland Cavalry, after he was surprised at Mr. Bartenstein's, near Upperville, and attempted to escape. Mosby ordered the entire command to Piedmont the following day, Sunday, to attend McCobb's funeral; definitely not a joyous occasion.

McIntosh, Charles M.

He was captured by the 8th Illinois Cavalry in the fight near Upperville, Saturday, October 29th, 1864.

After the war, he resided at Warrenton, Virginia.

Mackall, Robert M.

After the war, he resided at Olney, Montgomery County, Maryland.

Manning, ("Captain")

"Captain" Manning was wounded on Tuesday, March 21st, 1865, as Mosby's men contested the Yankee Cavalry near Hamilton, Virginia.

Mason, J. S.

After the war, he resided at Marshall, Virginia.

Mason, Landon R., Reverend

After the war, he resided at Richmond, Virginia, spending his days preaching the word of God as a Minister.

Mercer, Corbin W.

After the war, he resided at Richmond, Virginia.

Miller, James N.

After the war, he resided at Slate Mills, Virginia.

Moon, Jacob L.

After the war, he resided at Scottsville, Virginia.

Moon, James M.

After the war, he resided at Scottsville, Virginia, along with the rest of his family, including his brothers, Jacob and John.

Moon, John B.

After the war, he resided at Scottsville, Virginia.

Moss, Thomas

Thomas was injured on Sunday, March 12th, 1865, as Mosby's men contested the advance of the 13th New York Cavalry; his horse fell on him.

After the war, he worked for the Southern Railway Company, Alexandria, Virginia.

O'Brien, Edwin H.

Mr. O'Brien was slightly wounded in the leg on Sunday, March 12th, 1865, as Mosby's men valiantly continued the struggle, contesting the advance of the 13th New York Cavalry.

After the war, he resided at Alexandria, Virginia.

Overby, William Thomas (killed)

Overby was one of the six Mosby's Men executed at Front Royal by orders of General George Custer on Friday, September 23rd, 1864. Overby and Love, were hung to a tree in sight of the town of Front Royal, and a paper pinned on the breast of one read: "Such is the fate of all of Mosby's gang."
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************************************************************** UPDATE

Atlanta, GA. The remains of the Mosby's Ranger often called the "Nathan Hale of the Confederacy" lie once again in the soil of his native Georgia. William Thomas Overby was given a hero's reburial January 5, 1997, in Oakhill Cemetery in Newnan, Georgia, southwest of Atlanta. His body had lain the past 132 years in a rural Virginia Cemetery near where he was hanged on September 23, 1864, for refusing to reveal the whereabouts of the headquarters of his commander Confederate Cavalry Colonel John Singleton Mosby. Overby was the son of a Coweta County, GA, planter, and was wounded at 2nd Bull Run while with the 7th Georgia Infantry. In 1864 he was a 27 year old member of Company D, of Mosby's Rangers. He was captured near Front Royal, VA, with 5 other rebels. All six were executed, and Overby was one of the last two to die. His captors offered to spare his life if he would reveal Mosby's whereabouts, but he was refused and was hanged from a walnut tree. His last words were reportedly: "Mosby will hang 10 of you for every one of us." Mosby did indeed retaliate: he hanged seven captured Union troops, attaching a note to the body of one of them with words to the effect that he would hang no more prisioners if Yankee commander George Custer desisted from hanging anymore captured Confederates. The hangings ceased. Overby was buried in Markham, Virginia, in the family cemetery of one of the other men executed that day, according to the Atlanta Constitution. The Sharpsburg Sharpshooters Chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans in Coweta County made numerous attempts in recent years to have Overby's body returned, but without success. They finally got permission when the owner of the Virginia graveyard died and the new owners, descendants and judges in both states were amenable. Overby's few remaining bones were retrieved on the weekend of December 20-21, 1996, by members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV), and returned to Newnan, GA. There, they were placed in a pine period coffin and lay in state on January 4, 1997, in the Coweta County Courthouse. The coffin was draped in a Confederate flag and topped with a framed photo of Overby under a pair of Confederate swords. An honor guard of Confederate reenactors stood vigil, wearing black armbands over their left sleeves. The following day, a Sunday, Overby's casket was transported to Oakhill Cemetery via a horse-drawn artillery caisson, accompanied by more than 300 reeanctors while about 300 spectators looked on. (reported by Joe Kirby, for the Civil War News, Route 1, Box 36, Turnbridge, VT, 05077, (802) 889-3500.

Rhodes, Lafayette (killed)

Rhodes was one of the six Mosby's Men executed at Front Royal by orders of General George Custer on Friday, September 23rd, 1864. He was the last of the 6, whose home was in Front Royal. He fled up Happy Creek but was pursued and captured. The townspeople all knew of the executions before he was brought back. As he was carried through the streets his old mother, whose only support he was, rushed out and clasping her arms around his neck, pleaded with all the eloquence of a fond mother's love that the Federals would spare the life of her son. But deaf to all her entreaties, they rudely unclasped her arms, and pushing her roughly to one side, carried their prisioner outside of the village and put him to death. After the war, Dr. R. C. Buck, of Orlean, VA wrote: "I saw this fight, and from a distance saw the killing of Rhodes, who was a friend and playmate of mine. I saw Overby and Carter just before they were hung. They were taken by their captures to Petty's wagon yard, and as I passed them General Custer and his staff rode along the street. The Yankees were taunting the poor fellows, who stood up proud and defiant and apparently unmoved. I recollect the appearance of Overby; he was standing with his hat and coat off, his wavy black hair floating in the breeze. I never saw a finer specimen of manhood."

Riggs, Joshua Warfield

Riggs, Joshua Warfield, Private in Company D. Enlisted 5-14-61 for 12 months in Company K, 1st Virginia Cavalry by Captain Gaither at Leesburg. Present on July 1861 thru April 1862 in the muster rolls. Admitted 5-14-62 to General Hospital, Richmond. Returned to duty 5-15-62. Enlisted 5-15-62 as a Sergeant in Company A, 1st Maryland Cavalry. Joined the 43rd Virginia Cavalry (date unknown). Paroled 4-21-65 at Winchester. Age 22, 5'-11", fair complexion, dark hair, grey eyes. Residence in Montgomery County, Maryland. Surrendered paroled and took oath 5-19-65 at Harpers Ferry. Born 3-4-44 at "Rockland" near Tridelphia, Montgomery County, Maryland. Merchant in Baltimore, Maryland and Indianapolis, Indiana after the War. Lived in Baltimore, Maryland in 1895. Died 1-10-98 and is buried in Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland. He served the Confederacy from the beginning to the end. (Thanks to Samuel L. Riggs for submitting this info. to me).

Saunders, John A.

John was part of the fight near Frying Pan Church in Fairfax County, Va. on June 3rd, 1863. He was paroled on April 22nd, 1865 at Winchester, at the age of 20. He was listed having blue eyes, with fair complexion and light hair. He lived in Warrenton, Va, the son of Alfred and Ann Saunders. He, like hisbrother, Thomas B., are both buried in the Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Va.

Saunders, Thomas B. "Tom"

Tom, a cabinet-maker by career, enlisted in Company "K" 17th Virginia Infantry, at Warrenton, Va on April 22nd, 1861. He was 22 at the time. He was wounded on April 15th, 1863, near Suffolk, Va. Captured on September 8th, 1863 and send to Point Lookout, he was exchanged and retired to the Invalid Corps on August 22nd, 1864. He thence road with Mosby. He is buried in the Warrenton Cemeter, Warrenton, Va. He is the brother of Mosby Ranger John A. Saunders.

Saunders, William E.

He was paroled on April 22nd, 1865 at Winchester, Va. He was 18 years of age, hailed from Fauquier County, Va, and had light hair, hazel eyes with fair complexion. After the war, William moved to Bryan, Texas.

Sealock, Thomas, nicknamed "Roderick Dhu"

After the war, he resided at Linden, Virginia.

Sowers, Dr. J. R.

Dr. Sowers was slightly wounded on Sunday, February 19th, 1865, as Mosby's men were unable to capture the deserter, Spotts, who had led the Union Cavalry against the Partisans, who sustained losses this day, including the almost mortal wound of John Mosby himself.

After the war, Dr. Sowers healed many a sick patient at his hometown residence of Warrenton, Virginia.

Staton, W. W.

After the war, he resided at Pocahontas, Virginia.

Steele, Billings

After the war, Billings moved to Annapolis, Maryland.

Thomas, W. P.

After the war, he resided at Aldie, Virginia.

Tongue, William

After the war, he resided at Baltimore, Maryland.

Ware, Felix H.

On Friday evening, April 29th, 1864, Felix was shot in the hip while running up the mountain above Upperville.

After the war, Felix resided at Huntington, West Virginia.

White, John W.

After the war, John moved to Chicago, Illinois.

Williams, J. F., Reverend

After the war, he followed the Lord's work as a minister at Falls Church, Virginia.

Woodhouse, W. W.

After the war, he resided at Norfolk, Virginia.

Yates, Francis Marion (killed)

Francis Yates, of Rappahannock, was killed on March 12th, 1865, accidentally killed by his own men in the skirmish with the patrol of the 16th New York Cavalry. Handsome with jet black hair, and a mischievous smile, he died too soon in his youthful life.

 


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