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NEW YORK INFANTRY REGIMENTS

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Read about the 1910 G.A.R. De Alton Cooper Post Reunion at Adams, New York (owned by R.A. Mosocco, owner of this Website for your personal viewing)

New York Herald Star - 1st Photo of a Newspaper Field Office - for your personal view only!

Read about 13 G.A.R - Grand Army of the Republic - Veterans March in New York Parade (for your personal viewing only)

"The Gunner at His Piece - College Point, New York and the Civil War, with Biographies of the Men Who Served", by James E. Haas. Originally published in 2002, by Gateway Press, Inc., Baltimore, MD. 272 page, paperback, with illustrations, photos, census and service data, biographies of these illustrious Civil War men, and index. "With two hundred and twenty six men with ties to College Point, New York, James E. Haas was drawn to his own roots and was inspired to compile the Civil War history of these unique men that were united through geography. Although these men would go on to fight alongside men from other New York regions and states, (such as Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Michigan, etal), they shared a common bond; many were born and raised in College Point; at a minimum, living and at one time or another calling College Point home. James Haas has done an exceptional job in compiling the history of these valiant young men. You too will find this book worthy of adding to your library. He was very thorough in his research. (reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website). This book costs
$ 19.95 and can be ordered directly from the author. You can contact him now by going to his website at http://www.jimhaasbooks.com
click here to view front of paperback
back of paperback
view the book's foreword

"Registers of New York Regiments in the War of the Rebellion," by the Adjutant General of New York. Published in 43 volumes at Albany, New York from the years 1894 through 1906.

"New York in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865," by Fred Phisterer. This six volume set, published in 1912, at Albany, New York, may prove difficult to locate, but if found, may cost around $ 550.00.

"Three Years with the Adirondack Regiment," by John Cunningham. Originally published in 1920, this book may prove hard to find.

1st New York, "First New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment:" Organized at New York City and mustered in April 22, 1861. Left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., May 20, 1861, and duty there until July 3. Attached to Fort Monroe, Camp Hamilton and Newport News, Va., Dept. of Virginia, May, 1861, to May, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to May, 1863.

SERVICE--Occupation of Newport News May 29, 1861. Action at Big Bethel, Va., June 10. Duty at Camp Hamilton and Newport News, Va., until June, 1862. Action between Monitor and Merrimac in Hampton Roads March 8, 1862. Joined Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula June 5. Actions near Fair Oaks June 20, 23 and 24. Oak Grove, near Fair Oaks, June 25. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. About Fair Oaks June 26-29. Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. Duty at Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville, Va., August 16-27. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 28-September 2. Battle of Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until October, 11. March up the Potomac to Leesburg, then movement to Falmouth, Va., October 11-November 23. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Mustered out May 25, 1863, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 79 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 31 Enlisted men by disease. Total 113.

1st New York Volunteer Engineers, "Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteers," by Anita Palladino, published by Fordham University Press. This book covers Westervelt's experiences in South Carolina, Florida and Virginia through a series of journal entries he wrote and sent home to his 13 year old son. Anita was also fortunate to discover a package of his artwork which was laying forgotten in the archives at West Point and meant to accompany the diary. The original handwritten diary was found in the 1920's by Anita's step-father that she inherited it from.
1996 issue, 250 pages, cost of $ 27.00. Order direct from Fordham University Press at (800-247-6553).

1st New York Engineers Website

3rd New York Volunteer Infantry, "From Antietam to Fort Fisher: The Civil War Letters of Edward King Wightman, 1862-1865 of the 9th and 3rd New York Infantry," by Edward G. Longacre. 1985 issue, 295 pages, cost $ 40.00.

5th New York, aka "the Duryee Zouaves"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

5th New York, "Camp and Field Life of the Duryee Zouaves," by Alfred Davenport, New York. 485 pages, index, roster. Originally published in 1879, this reprint has a new introduction by Mike McAfee, cost $37.50.

5th New York, "A Duryee Zouave," by Private Thomas P. Southwick, Fifth New York Volunteer Infantry. Originally published in 1930, this reprint has a new introduction by Brian Pohanka, with 59 biographies, index, paperback, costs $ 15.00.

5th New York, "We Came to Fight" - The History of the 5th New York Duryee's Zouaves, by Patrick Schroeder. This is a new book about the 5th New York. There is a difference from Davenport's book in that this book deals with the reenlistment and the battles from 1864-1865. Davenport's book does not deal with the second term of enlistment. This book basically completes the entire term of service of the fifth New York. Available for $40.00 pretty much anywhere that sells Civil War books. (Thanks to Mike Nicosia, aka Woodynails@aol.com for this info.)

5th New York Volunteer Infantry Website.

5th New York Volunteer Infantry Website - Durye`e's Zouaves

Read about William McGuffage, Company F, 5th New York, later Dureay's Zouaves Volunteer Infantry Regiments, (as owned by Ronald A. Mosocco, owner of this website for your personal viewing only!)

Part 2 - continued...

6th New York, "The History of a Volunteer Regiment, the Sixth Regiment New York Volunteers," by Gouverneur Morris. Originally published in 1891, at New York, New York, "what makes this book so interesting is that the author tries to dispell the reputation that you had to be a criminal to get in. Colonel Billy Wilson was an ex-fighter. I read this one and it is a good account on life in Florida fighting Bragg. Rare book costing about 250 dollars. Thanks to Michael Nicosia, at Woodynails@aol.com for forwarding this info. to me. Reprint, 160 pages, with illustrations, costs $ 29.00. The 6th New York campaigned from Pensacola, Florida to the Red River Campaign.

Read the Life Story of Charles L. Hertle, member of the 6th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment (owned by R.A. Mosocco, owner of this Website for your personal viewing)

Read the Obituary of Charles L. Hertle, member of the 6th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment (owned by R.A. Mosocco, owner of this Website for your personal viewing)

7th New York, "The Regiment that Saved the Capital," by Thomas Yoseloff. This is the story of the 7th New York Infantry Regiment's march to the defense of unprotected Washington, D.C., during the initial days of outbreak of the war. 1961 release, cost $35.00.

9th New York State Militia, N.G.S. See History of the Eighty-third New York Volunteers, by William Dodd and George Hussey, New York.

9th New York Volunteer Infantry - "THE HAWKINS ZOUAVES BATTLES AND MARCHES" by J.H.E. WHITNEY 1866. There were two books written about the Hawkins Zouaves. This one came out right after the war. It's a small book and usually not found in good condition. Whitney writes with more passion and tends to focus on camp life. If found expect to pay between 200-250 dollars. [another review from Woodynails@aol.com]

9th New York Volunteer Infantry, "The Ninth Regiment New York Volunteers, Nevins' Notes," by Matthew J. Graham. Originally published in 1898, this book may be hard to find. 'There is now a nice reprint of Lt. Matthew J. Graham's "The Ninth Regiment New York Volunteers" It is published by Vanberg Publishing, P.O. Box 983, Lancaster, OH 43130-0983. It has a new introduction by Brian Pohanka. David Clark" Thanks to loneoak@inetworld.net for this info.

9th New York Volunteer Infantry, "ROCHESTER IN THE CIVIL WAR by BLAKE MEKELVEY,"Published in 1944, "This book came out as one of a series of historical books about Rochester. It is a collection of accounts from members of different regiments from Rochester. There is a chapter from a man belonging to the 140th New York Volunteers as well as a chapter of letters and diaries from a man belonging to the 10th New York Cavalry. There are a few other regiments represented as well. This book would serve as an excellent supplement to Bennett's 140th NY Vols. as well as Preston's 10th NY Cav. This book also stands alone. In fact, Nevins says the book is interesting reading and well written. If found expect to pay roughly 100 dollars for it." [another thanks toWoodynails@aol.com for his excellent review of New York regimentals]

9th New York Volunteer Infantry, "From Antietam to Fort Fisher: The Civil War Letters of Edward King Wightman, 1862-1865 of the 9th and 3rd New York Infantry," by Edward G. Longacre. 1985 issue, 295 pages, cost $ 40.00.

9th New York Volunteer Hawkins Zouaves Website.

10th New York Volunteer Infantry, "Services of the Tenth New York Volunteers (National Zouaves) in the War of the Rebellion," by Charles W. Cowtan, New York. Originally published in 1882, this rare edition may be hard to locate.

11th Regiment of New York Volunteer Infantry--("1st NEW YORK FIRE ZOUAVES." "ELLSWORTH'S ZOUAVES.") Organized at New York City and mustered in May 7, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., April 29, 1861. Duty at Washington May 2-23. Occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria, Va., May 24 (Ellsworth killed). Duty near Alexandria until July 16. Attached to Willcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21. Occupation of Fairfax Court House July 17. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Duty in New York Harbor and in Westchester County, N.Y., September-October, 1861, and at Newport News, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1862. Action between Monitor and Merrimac in Hampton Roads March 8, 1862. Duty at Near York May 7 to June 2. Mustered out June 2, 1862. Efforts failed to effect a new organization of this Regiment, known as the J. T. Brady Light Infantry, in summer of 1863, and the men enlisted were transferred to the 17th New York Veteran Infantry October 1, 1863.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 48 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 12 Enlisted men by disease. Total 66.

12th New York Volunteer Infantry Website

13th New York Volunteer Infantry, "History of the Thirteenth Regiment, N.G., S.N.Y.," by James Mandeville. Originally published in 1894, at New York, New York, this rare edition may be hard to locate, but if found, may cost around
$ 75.00.

14th Brooklyn State Militia, "The History of the Fighting Fourteenth Brooklyn State Militia,(84th New York)" by D.R. Marquis and Charles V. Tevis. Originally published in 1911 by the Brooklyn Eagle Press, New York, New York. Identified by their distinctive Zouave outfit, the 14th Brooklyn (84th New York), this unit was commanded by Colonels Alfred M. Wood and later Edward B. Fowler, and fought gallantly throughout the war from Bull Run to Spotsylvania, including Cedar Mountain, 2nd Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Mine Run Campaign, and Grant's Overland Campaign, "the Red-legged Devils" gained a reputation as a premier combat unit. An original copy if located, may cost around $ 275.00. 366 pages, photos, roster. 1994 reprint costs $ 40.00. {We need to point out that the 14th Brooklyn New York Infantry was actually a Chausseur Regiment and NOT Zouave. The 14th wore Chausseur uniforms and the only similarity to Zouaves was the red pants.} Thanks to Bill Pangrass, 14nysmco.g@worldnet.att.net Sgt. 14th Brooklyn NYSM, Co. G for submitting this important correction).

14th New York State Militia Website

14th Brooklyn New York State Militia, Company E, Website

(Another) 14th Brooklyn New York State Militia, Company E, Website.

15th New York Infantry Volunteer Regiment. Organized at New York City and mustered in for two years' service June 17, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., June 29. Duty as Infantry in the defenses of that city until October, 1861. Attached to McCune's Brigade July 30 to August 4, 1861. Franklin's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to September 26, and to Newton's Brigade to November, 1861. Designation of Regiment changed to 15th New York Engineers October 25, 1861. (See 15th Engineers.)

15th Regiment New York National Guard Infantry. Mustered in for thirty days' United States service June 6, 1864. Duty at various posts in New York Harbor. Mustered out July 7, 1864.

16th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Organized at Albany, N.Y., and mustered in for two years May 15, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., June 27. Attached to Davies' Brigade, Miles' Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Slocum's Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, to May, 1863.

SERVICE--Reconnoissance from Alexandria on Fairfax Road July 14, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21. Fairfax Court House July 17. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Duty in the defenses of Washington until March, 1862. Expedition to Pohick Church October 3, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15, 1862. McDowell's advance on Fredericksburg, Va., April 4-12. Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula April 22. Siege of Yorktown April 24-May 4 (on transports). West Point May 7-8. Near Mechanicsville May 22. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Gaines Mill June 27. Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-28. In works at Centreville August 28-31, and cover Pope's retreat from Bull Run to Fairfax Court House September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Crampton's Gap, South Mountain, September 14. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Mustered out May 22, 1863, expiration of term. Three years' men transferred to 121st New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 106 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 85 Enlisted men by disease. Total 197.

16th New York Infantry, "From Bull Run to Chancellorsville, The Story of the Sixteenth New York Infantry together with Some Personal Reminiscences," by Major General Newton Martin Curtis. Curtis began his military career as Captain of Company A of the 16th, and would rise to Brevet Major General and would have fought at First Bull Run, the Peninsular Campaign, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Fort Fisher where he won the Congressional Medal of Honor having been wounded four times and lost his left eye. Originally published in 1906 by Putnam's, at New York, New York. 384 pages, an original copy may be hard to locate, but if found, may cost around $ 295.00. Reprint costs $ 37.50.

16th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

17th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

18th REGIMENT INFANTRY Organized at Albany, N.Y., and mustered in May 17, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., June 19. Attached to Davies' Brigade, Miles' Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, June to August, 1861. Franklin's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Newton's Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, to May, 1863.

SERVICE--Reconnoissance on Fairfax Road July 14, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21. Fairfax Court House July 17. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Skirmish at Springfield Station October 3, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15, 1862. McDowell's advance on Fredericksburg, Va., April 4-12. Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula April 22. Siege of Yorktown April 24-May 4 (on transports). West Point May 7-8. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Gaines Mill June 27. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-28. In works at Centreville August 29-31. Cover Pope's retreat to Fairfax Court House September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Crampton's Pass, South Mountain, September 14. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Three years men transferred to 121st Regiment New York Infantry May 11. Regiment moved to New York May 16, and mustered out May 28, 1863, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 34 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 32 Enlisted men by disease. Total 71.

18th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

19th New York Infantry, "Cayuga in the Field," by Henry Hall and James Hall. "This is actually two different books binded together and interestingly enough, it was originally published in 1873 that way. The first book is a record of the 19th New York Volunteers and all the batteries of the 3rd New York Artillery and is 316 pages long. The 2nd book is a record of the 75th New York Volunteer Infantry and is 270 pages long. I have a reprint of this because whenever I found an original, it was in poor condition. The reprint cost about 35 dollars while the original can cost up 300 dollars depending on the condition." Again thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for his special expertise in New York Regimentals and forwarding this info. to me for use on my website.

20th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: (United Turner Regiment) Organized at New York City May 6, 1861. Left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., June 13. Attached to Fortress Monroe and Camp Hamilton, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, to May, 1863.

SERVICE--Duty at Fortress Monroe and Camp Hamilton June 15 to August 26, 1861. Hampton, Va., August 7. Bombardment and capture of Forts Hatteras and Clarke, N. C., August 28-29. Duty at Fortress Monroe and Camp Hamilton September 13, 1861, to May 10, 1862. New Market Bridge, near Newport News, December 22, 1861. Reconnoissance to Big Bethel January 3, 1862. Tranter's Creek and occupation of Norfolk and Portsmouth May 10. Duty at Norfolk until June 9. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field June 9. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-28. In works at Centreville August 29-31, and cover Pope's retreat to Fairfax Court House September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Crampton's Pass, South Mountain, September 14. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. At Hagerstown, Md., until October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At White Oak Church until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Three years men transferred to 3rd New York Battery and to Battery "F" 5th United States Artillery May 6. Regiment mustered out June 1, 1863, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 53 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 58 Enlisted men by disease. Total 120.

20th New York State Militia, The Twentieth Ulster Guard, "Civil War Diaries of Colonel Theodore B. Gates," by Colonel Theodore B. Gates. Originally published in 1879, at New York, New York. "This, in my opinion, is the best regimental history available. It was written by General Gates because in his words 'no one else did.' He says "I was not ambitious to undertake the labor of writing the history of the 'Ulster Guard' and as most of its old members know another pen was expected to perform the service". The book is wonderfully written and is a must for any Civil War reader. I happen to be very fortunate because mine is signed by the author, Gates himself. Not an easy book to get but there are a few available. I've seen about 4 of them. Expect to pay 250-300 dollars. The book is almost 600 pages long and heavy so some restoration work may be needed. Well worth it. It's a great book from a great man. Again thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for his special expertise in New York Regimentals and forwarding this info. to me for use on my website. Revised by Seward Osborne and reprinted in 1991 with 175 pages. Costs around $ 25.00. Another reprint of 619 pages costs $ 55.00.

20th New York State Militia Website

20th New York,, "Der Turner Soldat (The Turner Soldier)," by C. Eugene Miller Ph.D. & Forrest F. Steinlage L.S., Calmar Publications, Louisville, KY, 1988. The "Turner" name is derived from the German word for "gymnast" and the exercise club or athletic facility where they went for workouts was called a "Turnverein". The "blurb" on the inside of the book's dust cover says in part: "In 1861, the New York Turnverein organized the 20th New York Volunteer Regiment, the United Turner Rifles. The regiment was composed of officers and enlisted men from several Turnverein in the east. In two years, it fought several major battles at Hatteras Inlet, Chickahominy River, Savage's Station, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. A detailed account of the regiment's activities during the war has not been written." The book contains the roster of Company B, Turner Rifles; there were 64 privates at their first muster (among them my grandfather George Junginger, later changed to English spelling "Yunginger"). Only 38 of them survived to be mustered out. (thanks to Tom Cantrall)

21st New York Infantry Volunteer Regiment--("1st BUFFALO REGIMENT.") Organized at Buffalo, N.Y., and mustered in for two years' State service May 8, 1861. Remustered at Elmira, N.Y., for three months' United States service May 20, 1861. Left Elmira, N.Y., for Washington, D. C., June 18. Attached to Mansfield's Command, Dept. of Washington, to August, 1861. Division of the Potomac to October, 1861. Wadsworth's Brigade, McDowell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Patrick's 2nd Brigade, King's 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1862. 2nd Brigade, King's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. Provost Marshal, General Patrick's Command, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1863.

SERVICE.--Camp at Kalorama Heights, Washington, D.C., until July 14, 1861. Garrison at Fort Runyon until August 20. Transferred to United States service for balance of State enlistment by order of Governor E. D. Morgan August 2, 1861. Moved to Rip Raps with mutineers August 20-30. Camp at Arlington Heights, Va., until September 28, and at Upton's Hill, Va., until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Camp at Upton's Hill until April 9. McDowell's advance on Falmouth, Va., April 9-19. Duty at Fredericksburg until May 25. McDowell's advance on Richmond May 25-29. Operations against Jackson June 1-21. At Falmouth until July 28, and at Fredericksburg until August 6. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 21-23. Sulphur Springs August 26. Gainesville August 28. Groveton August 29. 2nd Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 29. Movement to Palmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Assigned to provost duty at Aquia Creek January to May, 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Mustered out May 18, 1863, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 74 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 40 Enlisted men by disease. Total 118.

21st New York, "Chronicles of the Twenty-first Regiment, New York State Volunteers," by Harrison J. Mills, New York. Originally published in 1863, this book may be hard to find.

21st New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

Read about the 1939 Memorial Day Parade including Edward Hurley of the 21st New York (owned by R.A. Mosocco, owner of this Website for your personal viewing)

22nd New York Infantry, "History of the Twenty-Second Regiment of the National Guard of the State of New York," by George W. Wingate. Originally published in 1896, at New York, New York, reprint of 762 pages, with illustrations costs $ 65.00.

23rd New York State National Guard, "Our Campaign Around Gettysburg (23rd NYSNG) June & July, 1863," by John Lockwood. Originally published in 1864, at Brooklyn, New York, an original copy of this book may cost your around $ 125.00.

23rd New York, "Campfires of the Twenty-third; Sketches of the Camp Life, Marches and Battles of the Twenty Third, N.Y.V.," by Pound Sterling, (William P. Maxson). Originally published in 1863 at New York, New York. - "This is a small book written by a member of the regiment who wasn't named Pound Sterling. Written while the war was suntil in progress it doesn't cover the later battles. If found expect to pay the standard rate for a union regimental these days. 250-300 dollars." (Thanks to my New York Correspondent) Woodynails@aol.com Reprint, 196 pages, costs $ 29.00.

25th New York Regiment Infantry--(3 MONTHS.) Moved to Washington, D.C., April 22, 1861. Attached to Mansfield's Command, Dept. of Washington, D.C. Advance into Virginia May 23. Occupation of Arlington Heights, Va., May 24. Engaged in fatigue duty at Arlington Heights building, Fort Albany, until July. MUstered out August 4, 1861.

25th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment--("UNION RANGERS.") Organized at New York City May 11, 1861. Mustered in June 28, 1861, and left State for Washington, D.C., July 3, 1861. Attached to Garrison at Fort Albany, defenses of Washington, until July 21. McCunn's Brigade, Army of Northeast Virginia, to August 4, 1861. Hunter's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Butterfield's Brigade, Porter's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Martindale's 1st Brigade, Porter's 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps, to June, 1863.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. Moved to the Virginia Peninsula March 16. Warwick Road April 5. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Hanover Court House May 27. Operations about Hanover Court House May 27-29. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Mechanicsville June 26; Gaines Mill June 27; White Oak Swamp and Turkey Bend June 30; Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Retreat from the Peninsula and movement to Centreville August 16-28. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 28-September 2. Battle of 2nd Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Shepherdstown September 19. At Sharpsburg, Md., until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Expedition to Richards' and Ellis' Fords, Rappahannock River, December 29-30. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth, Va., until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Mustered out June 26, 1863, and honorably discharged from service July 10, 1865. Three years men transferred to 44th New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 54 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 25 Enlisted men by disease. Total 90.

25th New York Regiment of National Guard Infantry: Mustered in for three months' service May 31, 1862. Left State for Suffolk, Va., June 4. Duty at Suffolk, Va., attached to 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, until September. Mustered out September 8, 1862.

25th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: "Encounter With History; The Memoirs, Reminiscences and Amazing Life of Captain Edmund Richard Pitman Shurly, 1829 - 1909"

I can now report my book about the Civil War and the Indian Wars that followed is released to bookstores around the country including Barnes & Noble and seems to be selling rather well. It is the biography of my great grandfather and the wild adventures he had during those wars and afterwards. It's fast reading and fully researched for accuracy. I think you'll enjoy it. Below is the press release prepared by the publisher. Regards, Bob Vanderzee (Port St. Lucie, Florida) March 6, 2008— Robert Vanderzee and iUniverse, Inc., the leading provider of publishing technology solutions for authors, announced today the release of his new book Encounter With History; The Memoirs, Reminiscences and Amazing Life of Captain Edmund Richard Pitman Shurly, 1829 - 1909. In this richly detailed, compelling historical biography, Robert Vanderzee brings to life the adventures, courage, and determination of his great-grandfather, Edmund Richard Pitman Shurly, who was a part of an extraordinary generation during an extraordinary time. Joining the Union army after Lincoln’s first call, Shurly served with the twenty-sixth New York Volunteers Infantry Regiment, which fought Stonewall Jackson’s cannons in numerous battles, including the second battle of Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After serving his country in Civil War combat, Shurly helped to put down a gigantic Confederate Secret Service conspiracy to free prisoners in Chicago and embarrass Lincoln before his reelection, and after the war, experienced terrifying and bloody gunfights with Sioux Indians along the Bozeman Trail in Wyoming and Montana. On several occasions Shurly was injured, but he summoned the strength to recover and continue service as the country expanded westward. Meticulously researched and documented, this engaging volume pays tribute to an unsung hero of Civil War and Indian War history. Robert Vanderzee, a University of Michigan graduate and retired Director of Engineering for an industrial corporation, is a great-grandson of E. R. P. Shurly. He interviewed dozens of authorities and researched voluminous family archives, records, and scrapbooks. He has traveled to every battlefield where his great-grandfather fought, including the Bozeman Trail in Wyoming and Montana. Vanderzee lived in Akron, Ohio, for many years, then moved to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, before retiring to his home in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Readers looking for something new in Civil War and Indian War nonfiction will find the story of Edmund Shurly a page-turner, and serious Indian War buffs will want to add his name to their list of heroes. Encounter with History Biography & Autobiography / General Trade Paperback Publication Date: Mar-2008 Price: $19.95 Size: 6 x 9 Author: Robert Vanderzee ISBN: 0-595-46963-9 251 Pages On Demand Printing Available from Ingram Book Group, Baker & Taylor, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and from iUniverse, Inc. To order call 1-800-AUTHORS About iUniverse: iUniverse offers a variety of publishing services to help individuals publish, market, and sell fiction, poetry and nonfiction books. The company utilizes print-on-demand technology, and is one of the largest self-publishing companies in the United States, publishing more than 5,000 new titles each year. The iUniverse management team has extensive editorial and managerial experience with traditional publishers such as HarperCollins, Putnam, Simon & Schuster and Holtzbrinck. iUniverse partners with industry leading author organizations, including the Authors Guild, the Harlem Writers Guild, and the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA) to bring innovative programs to their members. iUniverse has strategic alliances with Barnes & Noble, Inc. in the U.S. and Chapters Indigo in Canada and has offices in New York City, Shanghai and Lincoln, Neb. For more information, please visit www.iuniverse.com or call 1-800-AUTHORS. # # # Media Contact: Robert Vanderzee, VanZee Publishing Co., 772-489-9808, rsv591@comcast.net.

27th REGIMENT INFANTRY ("UNION REGIMENT"). Organized at Elmira, N.Y., May 21, 1861. Mustered in June 15, 1861, and left State for Washington, D.C., July 10. Attached to Porter's Brigade, Hunter's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Slocum's Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Slocum's 2nd Brigade, Franklin's 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, to May, 1863.

SERVICE--Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21, 1861. Battle of Bull Run, Va., July 21. Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Expedition to Pohick Church October 3, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15, 1862. McDowell's advance on Fredricksburg April 4-12. Ordered to the Peninsula, Virginia, April 22. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 24-May 4, on transports. West Point May 7-8. Near Mechanicsville May 20. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Gaines' Mill and Chickahominy June 27. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-28. In works at Centreville August 28-31, and cover Pope's retreat to Fairfax Court House September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Crampton's Gap, South Mountain, September 14. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Mustered out May 31, 1863, expiration of term. Three years' men transferred to 121st Regiment New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 72 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 70 Enlisted men by disease. Total 146.

27th New York Volunteer Infantry, "History of the Twenty-seventh Regiment New York Volunteers: Being a Record of Its More than Two Years of Service in the War for the Union, from May 21st, 1861, to May 31st, 1863," compiled by C.B. Fairchild, of Company "D" of the 27th New York. Originally published in 1888 by Carl & Matthews, Printers, Binghamton, New York, this book may be hard to find. 303 pages, with illustrations and maps, reprint costs $ 35.00. Includes service in the Union VI Corps, but ends abruptly with the 1863 Spring Campaigns.

28th New York Volunteers, "A Brief History of the Twenty-eighth Regiment, New York State Volunteers, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac," this first edition, was published in 1896 by C. W. Boyce at Buffalo, New York. 194 pages, with illustrations, costs $ 32.00..

28th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment ("SCOTT LIFE GUARD") Organized at Albany, N.Y., and mustered in May 22, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., June 25, 1861. Attached to Mansfield's Command to July, 1861. Butterfield's Brigade, Sandford's Division, Patterson's Army of the Shenandoah, to October, 1861. Gordon's Brigade, Banks' Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Banks' 5th Army Corps, to April, 1862. 1st Brigade. 1st Division, Dept. of the Shenandoah, to June, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863.

SERVICE-Near Martinsburg, Va., July 11, 1861. Expedition to Point of Rocks, Md., August 5. Guard and outpost duty on the Upper Potomac until February, 1862. Operations near Edwards' Ferry October 20-24, 1861. Advance on Winchester, Va., March 1-12, 1862. Occupation of Winchester March 12. Ordered to Manassas, Va., March 18, and back to Winchester March 19. Pursuit of Jackson March 24-April 27. Columbia Furnace April 16. Near Harrisonburg April 24. Gordonsville April 26. Operations in the Shenandoah Valley May 15-June 17. At Strasburg until May 20. Retreat to Winchester May 20-25. Front Royal May 23. Battle of Winchester May 24-25. Retreat to Williamsport May 25-26. Bunker Hill May 25. At Williamsport until June 10. Moved to Front Royal June 10-18. Reconnoissance to Luray June 29-30. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 20-23. White Sulphur Springs August 23-25. Plains of Manassas August 26-28. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17. At Sandy Hook and Maryland Heights September 22 to December 10. March to Fairfax Station December 10-14, and duty there until January 19. Moved to Stafford Court House January 19-23, and duty there until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Mustered out June 2, 1863, expiration of term. Three years' men transferred to 60th Regiment New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 46 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 50 Enlisted men by disease. Total 98.

33rd New York State Volunteer Infantry, "The Story of the Thirty-Third New York State Volunteers: Or Two Years Campaigning in Virginia and Maryland," by David W. Judd. Originally published in 1864 at Rochester, New York, this book may be hard to find. 425 pages, with illustrations, costs $ 35.00.

33rd New York State Volunteer Infantry, "Path of Blood: the True Story of the Thirty-Third New York Volunteers," by George W. Contant. Approximately 400 pages, with 100 photos and maps, including an index of the men and officers' biographies. Based on over 300 letters and diaries, this book is scheduled for circa June, 1997 publication. The author is offering a pre-publication $ 5.00 discount off the cover price by visiting his website listed below on the 33rd.

33rd New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry (Path of Blood) Website.

34th REGIMENT INFANTRY.--("HERKIMER REGIMENT.") Organized at Albany, N.Y., and mustered in June 15, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C, July 3, 1861. Attached to Stone's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Gorman's 2nd Brigade, Stone's (Sedgwick's) Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863.

SERVICE:--Outpost duty on the Upper Potomac until March, 1862. Reneca Mills, Md., September 1 and 16, 1861. Operations on the Potomac October 21-24. Near Edwards Ferry October 22. Moved to Harper's Ferry February, 1862; then to Charlestown and Berryville, Va., March 12-15. Moved to Fortress Monroe, Va., March 22-April 1. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. Duty at Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Newport News, then to Centreville August 16-29. Cover Pope's retreat from Bull Run August 31-September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Moved to Harper's Ferry September 22, and duty there until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 20. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Three years men transferred to 82nd New York Infantry June 8, 1863. Mustered out June 30, 1863, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 90 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 68 Enlisted men by disease. Total 162.

34th New York State Volunteer Infantry, " To Sacrifice, To Suffer and If Need be to Die', The Regimental History of the Thirty-fourth New York Volunteers," by 34th NY Lieutenant L. N. Chapin. "This is an EXCELLENT book on the 34th. The author gives you the feeling of being there through it's narrative and clear photos. This book has detailed information about each soldier who served in the regiment. There is also a dedication chapter to the monument at Antietam where 43 members of the regiment were killed by the Dunker Church. The book was originally published in September of 1902, but is available on acid-free paper as a hard-cover reprint with a dust jacket for about 25 dollars."

34th New York State Volunteer Infantry,"Desolating this Fair Country - The Civil War Diary and Letters of Lt. Henry C. Lyon, 343th New York Infantry," Edited by Emily N. Radigan, NO dustjacket as issued! 209 Pages. 1999. The letters of Henry C. Lyon, an upstate New Yorker, that was killed at Antietam in 1862. He was well educated and wrote like a scholar. This book offers interesting insight on politics as he was a staunch Republican. Costs around 25.00 dollars. Thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for forwarding this info. to me.

34th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

35th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: " History of the Thirty-Fifth New York Volunteers: A Full Report of the First Re-Union and Banquet of the Thirty-Fifth N.Y. Volunteers, held at Watertown, New York on December 13th, 1887, also including Much Valuable Data Pertaining to the History and Members of the Gallant 35th, Past and Present ------Watertown, New York Times Printing and Publishing House, 1888." The book is hard bound, in cobalt blue cloth covers, cover title in gold, with regimental insignia, a red filled-in circle 1 1/2" in diameter over a white circle slightly larger. 122 numbered pages plus end papers, including Banquet programs, letters, Regimental history, 37 pages of Muster Out rolls, and 20 pages of personal history and recollections of members. The book measures 7 1/4" wide by 10 1/2" high. A brief history: "A brief history: Volunteers were assembled at Elmira NY in April and May, 1861 and organized into 10 regiments and mustered into the service of the state for 2 years. The Thirty-Fifth was composed of 10 companies - 6 from Jefferson County, 1 from Lewis County, one from Erie County, one from Steuben County, and one from Madison County. They embarked for Washington DC on 11 July, 1861. The regiment spent the next 13 months encamped in northern Virginia, seeing no battle in that time, advancing from time-to-time further south, reaching Fredericksbug VA in late April, 1862. On 20 August 1862, the Thirty-Fifth came under fire for the first time. "Then from the 20th of August to the 1st of September, from the Rappahannock to Fall's Church - at Rappahannock Station, Warrenton, Sulphur Springs, Gainesville, Second Bull Run, Chanuntily, and Fairfax - that disastrous series of battles fought by our troops largely on the defensive - the 35th was almost daily engaged with the rebels, frequently in the darkness of night as well as by daylight, and suffered a loss of one hundred men - thirteen killed, forty wounded, and forty-seven missing." Having reached Washington in the retreat, they then marched into Maryland, where they participated in the Battle of South Mountain on 14 September, losing 10 men. On 17 September, the regiment bore an active part in the Battle of Antietam, losing seventy men - 6 killed, 52 wounded, 12 missing. Once again they marched into Virginia, this time heading west to Warrenton. Arriving there on 6 November. By 11 December, they were back in Fredericksburg, participating in the Battle of Fredericksburg. Their position on the left of the line, where there was little infantry engagement saved them from the heavy casualties suffered in the center and right of the line, but they lost six killed and 17 wounded, "two or three mortally" from heavy Artillery shelling on the second day. This was the last battle in which the Thirty-Fifth would be engaged. They served out the remainder of their enlistment in provost duty and were embarked for Elmira on 20 May 1863. (thanks to Larry Corbett) for contributing the above info. as well as his review of the regiment. Larry's at: lrcorbet@gisco.net

36th New York Regiment Infantry -- "Washington Volunteers" - Organized at New York City and mustered in June 17, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., July 12. Attached to Couch's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Couch's Brigade, Buell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to June, 1863.

SERVICE.--Duty at Kalorma Heights and Camp Brightwood, Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. March to Prospect Hill, Va., March 11-15. Moved to the Peninsula, Va., March 28. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Reconnoissance to Bottom's Bridge May 20-23, and to White Oak Swamp May 25-28. Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove, near Seven Pines, June 25; Savage Station June 29; White Oak Swamp June 30; Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-29. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Deep Run Ravine June 5-13. Ordered home for muster out. Three years men transferred to 65th Regiment, New York Infantry. Duty in New York during draft riots July 13-15. Mustered out July 15, 1863, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 36 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 26 Enlisted men by disease. Total 67.

36th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

37th New York Regiment Infantry -- "Irish Rifles" - Organized at New York City and mustered in June 7, 1861. Left the State for Washington, D.C., June 23. Attached to Hunter's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, August to October, 1861. Richardson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to June, 1863.

SERVICE--Duty In the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. (Cos. "H" and "I" detached as garrison at Fort Washington August, 1861, to March, 1862.) Reconnoissance to Pohick Church and Occoquan October 18, 1861, and November 11, 1861. Lee's House, Occoquan Bridge, January 29, 1862. Mason's Creek February 24. Moved to the Peninsula, Va., March 17. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven Days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Oak Grove near Seven Pines June 25. Charles City Cross Roads and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Moved to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-27. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 28-September 2. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30; Chanuntily September 1. Duty in the Defenses of Washington until October. Movement to Falmouth October and November. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 1. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Mustered out June 22, 1863, expiration of term. Three years men transferred to 40th Regiment New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 69 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 37 Enlisted men by disease. Total 112.

37th New York Volunteer National Guard Infantry Regiment: Organized for three months' service May 29, 1862. Left State for Middle Department May 29, and duty there until September. Mustered out September 2, 1862. Again mustered in for 30 days' service June 18, 1863. Left State for Harrisburg, Pa., June 19. Attached to 4th Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of the Susquehanna. Action at Sporting Hill June 30. Carlisle July 1. Mustered out July 22, 1863. Again mustered in for 30 days' service May 6, 1864. Duty in New York Harbor. Mustered out June 6, 1864.

38th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment "Scott Life Guard": Organized at New York City and mustered in June 3, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., June 19. Attached to Willcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Howard's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sedgwick's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to June, 1863.

SERVICE:--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until July 16. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21. Battle of Bull Run, Va., July 21. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15, 1862. Ordered to the Peninsula, Va., March 17. Peninsula Campaign April to August. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove near Seven Pines June 25. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-26. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 27-September 2. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30; Chanuntily September 1. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until October. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October and November. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Three years men transferred to 40th Regiment New York Infantry June 3. Mustered out June 22, 1863, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 72 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 39 Enlisted men by disease. Total 117.

39th New York Volunteer Infantry, "Lincoln's Foreign Legion: The Garibaldi Guard," by Michael Bacarella. This book is the story of the Garibaldi Guard, the unique group of foreign nationals who served in the Italian Wars of liberation, and especially of the Americans who later brought the lessons they learned in that service to the battlefields at Bull Run, the Wilderness, Gettysburg, and elsewhere. The book includes a list of nearly 2,000 men who served, with a brief concise synopsis of their time in the regiment. 1996 issue, 400 pages, roster, maps. Cost of $ 35.00

39th New York Volunteer Infantry, "Conquer or Die: The Thirty-Ninth New York Volunteer Infantry, Garibaldi Guard," by John M. Pellicano. Originally released in 1996, "this is a military history (not an ethnic study) of this calamitous regiment. It contains a full roster, maps, index, photographs and full description of their participation in the battles in which they fought. Available in paperback for $14.95." (thanks to the author, John Pellicano for forwarding this info. on his book to me). You can reach John at JP39@aol.com

39th New York, by Arabella Wilson. See Info. under the 126th New York.

39th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry (Garibaldi Guards) Website.

40th New York, aka "the Mozart Regiment"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

40th New York, "The History of the Fortieth (Mozart) Regiment New York Volunteers," by Frederick Clark Floyd. Originally published in 1909, at Boston, Massachusetts, this book may prove hard to find. A reprint is available, 469 pages, with illustrations for $ 47.50. (thanks to johan@viagrafix.net (David Johansson) for forwarding this info. to me).

41st New York, "Carl Bornemann's Regiment in the Civil War: 41st New York Infantry, DeKalb's Regiment," by David G. Martin. The only history of this all-German unit from New York City, includes detailed accounts of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Photos, 1987 reprint, 322 pages, costs $ 24.00 to $ 30.00.

42nd New York, aka "the Tammany Regiment"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

43rd New York, aka "the Albany Rifles"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

43rd New York Infantry Volunteer Regiment "ALBANY AND YATES' RIFLES." Organized at Albany, N.Y., August and September, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., September 21, 1861. Attached to Hancock's Brigade, W. F. Smith's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, to February, 1863. Light Division, 6th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1864, Army of the Shenandoah to December, 1864, and Army of the Potomac to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. Expedition to Vienna and Flint Hill February 22, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Moved to Alexandria March 16, then to Fortress Monroe, Va. Advance on Yorktown April 4-5. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Lee's Mills April 16. Reconnoissance toward Lee's Mills April 28. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Duty at White House until May 18. Picket duty near Richmond until June. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Garnett's Farm June 27. Garnett's and Golding's Farms June 28, White Oak Swamp June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-28. In works at Centreville August 28-31, and cover Pope's retreat to Fairfax Court House September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Sugar Loaf Mountain September 10-11. Crampton's Gap, South Mountain, September 14. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty at Hagerstown, Md., until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va.. December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Operation at Franklin's Crossing June 5-13. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor Juno 1-12. Before Petersburg June 17-18. Siege of Petersburg June 17 to July 6. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23. Moved to Washington, D.C., June 6-9. Repulse of Early's attack on Fort Stevens and Northern defenses of Washington July 11-12. Pursuit of Early July 14-22. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Gilbert's Ford, Opequan Creek, September 13. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Petersburg December 13-16. Siege of Petersburg December 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Fort Fisher, Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Danville, Va., April 23-27, and duty there until May 18. Moved to Richmond, then to Washington, D.C., May 18-June 2. Corps Review June 8. Mustered out June 27, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 13 Officers and 110 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 120 Enlisted men by disease, Total 244.

44th New York, aka "the Ellsworth's Avengers"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

44th New York, "History of the 44th New York Infantry," by Eugene A. Nash. With introduction by Gerald W. Pergande. Originally published in 1911. The 44th New York Volunteer Infantry was posted just right of the 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry on Little Round Top at Gettysburg, PA, July, 1863. 474 pages, with maps, roster, and roster. This 1988 reprint now costs $ 40.00.

Read about and see Eugene Promie, member of the 44th New York. (Original owned by R.A. Mosocco, owner of this website). Picture 1 Picture 2

47th New York Regiment Infantry -- "WASHINGTON GRAYS." Organized at New York and mustered in September 14, 1861. Moved to Washington, D.C., then to Annapolis, Md., September, 1861. Attached to Viele's 1st Brigade, Sherman's South Carolina Expeditionary Corps, to April, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Dept. of the South, to July, 1862. District of Hilton Head, S.C., 10th Corps, Dept. of the South, to April, 1863. Ossabaw Sound and Folly Island, S. C., to July, 1863. Folly Island, S.C., 10th Corps, to August, 1863. 5th Brigade, Morris Island, S.C., 10th Army Corps, to October, 1863. Unattached, Folly Island, S.C., to November, 1863. District of Hilton Head, S.C., to December, 1863. Barton's Brigade, District of Hilton Head, S.C., to February, 1864. Barton's Brigade, District of Florida, February, 1864. Barton's Brigade, Ames' Division, District of Florida, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to May, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, to June, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 24th Army Corps, to January, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Terry's Provisional Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to July, 1865. Dept. of North Carolina to August, 1865.

SERVICE.--Expedition to Port Royal, S.C., October 21-November 7, 1861. Capture of Forts Wagner and Beauregard, Port Royal Harbor, S.C., November 7. Hilton Head, S.C., November 7-8. Port Royal Ferry, Coosaw River, January 1, 1862. Reconnoissance to Wright River February 6. Siege operations against Fort Pulaski Ga., February 11-April 11. Bombardment and capture of Fort Pulaski April 10-11. Expedition to James Island, S.C., June 1-28. Action on James Island June 10. Battle of Secessionville June 16. Evacuation of James Island and movement to Hilton Head, S.C., June 28-July 7. Hilton Head, S.C., until April, 1863. Duty at Ossabaw Island and Folly Island, S.C., until July. Siege operations against Forts Wagner and Gregg, Morris Island, S. C, July 18-September 7. Bombardment of Fort Sumpter and Charleston August 17-23. Operations against Charleston and duty on Folly Island, S. C, until December, and at Hilton Head, S.C., until February, 1864. Expedition to Jacksonville, Fla., February 5-7. Occupation of Jacksonville February 7. Expedition into Central Florida February 7-22. Battle of Olustee February 20. Occupation of Palatka March 10. Duty at Jacksonville until April. Moved to Gloucester Point, Va., April 22-28. Butler's operations on south side of the James and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Port Walthall Junction, Chester Station, May 7. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-14. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-28. Moved to White House, then to Cold Harbor May 28-June 1. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16 to December 7, 1864. Demonstration on north side of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Fair Oaks October 27-28. Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., December 7-25. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 3-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Cape Fear entrenchments February 11-12. Sugar Loaf Battery February 11. Fort Anderson February 18-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Kinston and Goldsboro March 6-21. Advance on Raleigh April 9-14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Raleigh and in the Dept. of North Carolina until August. Mustered out August 30; 1865.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 70 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 160 Enlisted men by disease. Total 237.

47th REGIMENT NATIONAL GUARD INFANTRY. Mustered in for three months' United States service May 27, 1862. Left State for Baltimore, Md., May 30, and duty at Fort McHenry until September. Mustered out September 1, 1862. Again mustered in for 30 days' United States service June 17, 1863. Left State for Washington, D.C., June 18, 1863. Duty in the defenses of that city.

Attached to 3rd Brigade, defenses south of the Potomac, 22nd Army Corps, until July. Mustered out July 23, 1863.

47th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

(another) 47th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

48th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

48th New York, "The History of the Forty-eighth Regiment New York State Volunteers," by Abraham Palmer. Originally published in 1885, this book may prove hard to find.

The 48th New York Regimental has been now been transcribed onto the Internet by Charlotte Sandel Beck, a descendant of a soldier of the 48th Regiment. Click here for access to her website

48th New York, "Perry's Saints; or the Fighting Parson's Regiment in the War of the Rebellion," by James M. Nichols, past Colonel of the Forty-eighth New York Volunteers. Named for its leader, Colonel (Reverend) James Perry, late pastor of a Methodist-Episcopal Church in Brooklyn, NY. This unit saw action against the coastal defenses of Charleston, Fort Pulaski, Fort Wagner, Cold Harbor, Jamestown, Fort Fisher, Richmond and at Petersburg. Originally published in 1886, by the Lothrop Company, Boston, Massachusetts, this book may prove hard to find, but if found will cost you around $ 250.00. Includes operations along the South Carolina and Florida Coasts. Reprint, 299 pages, with illustrations and folding map, costs
$ 32.00.

48th New York, "The History of the Forty-eighth Regiment New York State Volunteers," by Abraham Palmer. Originally published in 1885, this book may prove hard to find.

48th New York, "Company D, The Die-No Mores, of the Forty-Eighth Regiment, New York State Volunteers, 1861-1865," by William J. Carlton. Originally published in 1892, this original private edition is available from a private collector, 19 pages.

49th New York, aka "the Second Buffalo"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

49th New York, "The History of the Forty-ninth New York Volunteers," by Frederick Bidwell. Originally published in 1916, by the Lyon Company, Albany, New York, this regiment covers the complete roster of the nearly 900 men who comprised this regiment. This regiment saw action in over 50 encounters, including Cedar Creek, and Petersburg. The 49th lost over 45 percent of its men at Spotsylvania Court House; another 24 of its men died as prisoners of war at Andersonville and other Confederate prisons. This book may be hard to find, but if found, could cost around $ 225.

49th New York Regiment - Company D - Reenactor's Volunteer Infantry Website

49th New York Regiment - Company D - Reenactor's Volunteer Infantry Website, Niagara County, NY

50th New York Engineers, "Bridge Building in Wartime: Colonel Wesley Brainerd's Memoir of the Fiftieth New York Volunteer Engineers," edited by Ed Malles. Originally published in 1997, this book costs around $ 45.00.

51st New York, aka "the Shepard Rifles"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

50th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, (Shepard Rifles)," Organized at New York City July 27 to October 23, 1861. Left State for Annapolis, Md., October 29. Attached to Reno's 2nd Brigade, Burnside's North Carolina Expeditionary Corps, to April, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to July, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1863, Army of the Ohio to June, 1863, Army of the Tennessee to August, 1863, and Army of the Ohio, to September, 1863. District of North Central Kentucky, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, to February, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 26, 1864. Engineers, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, to July 2, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE:--Duty at Annapolis, Md., until January 6, 1862. Burnside's Expedition to Hatteras Inlet and Roanoke, Island, N. C., January 6-February 7, 1862. Battle of Roanoke Island February 8. Duty at Roanoke Island until March 11. Movement to New Berne, N. C., March 11-13. Battle of New Berne March 14. Expedition to Elizabeth City April 17-19. Duty at New Berne until July. Moved to Newport News, Va., July 6-9, then to Fredericksburg August 2-4. March to relief of Pope, August 12-15. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Kelly's Ford August 21. Sulphur Springs August 23-24. Plains of Manassas August 27-29. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30; Chanuntily September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of Frederick City September 12; South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. At Pleasant Valley until October 27. March to Falmouth, Va., October 27-November 17. Jefferson November 11. Sulphur Springs November 13. Warrenton November 15. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. Moved to Newport News, Va., February 19, then to Covington and Paris, Ky., March 26-April 1. Moved to Mt. Sterling, Ky., April 3, to Lancaster May 6-7, and to Crab Orchard May 23. Movement to Vicksburg, Miss., June 3-17. Siege of Vicksburg June 17-July 4. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Destruction of railroad at Madison Station July 19-22. At Milldale until August 6. Moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, August 6-20, then to Nicholasville, Ky. Provost duty in District of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to February, 1864. Veterans on furlough March-April. Moved to Annapolis, Md., and rejoined corps. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Ny River May 12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 22. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864. Weldon Railroad August 18-21. Poplar Grove Church, Peeble's Farm September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Fort Stedman, Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee to Farmville April 3-9. Moved to Petersburg, then to City Point and Washington, D.C., April 20-28. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington, D.C., and Alexandria, Va., until July. Mustered out July 25, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 193 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 174 Enlisted men by disease. Total 378.

51st New York Volunteers, "Civil War Letters of George Washington Whitman." Originally published in 1975, by Duke University Press, George Whitman was the younger brother of Poet Walt Whitman. Walt traveled to Fredericksburg when he learned his brother was wounded and stayed on to become a nurse, writing about the war, and caring for the wounded. The Fifty-first New York, aka, the Shepard Rifles, fought with Burnside and Pope, fighting at New Berne, Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and at Appomattox. 173 pages with photos, index, costs $ 35.00.

52nd New York, aka "the German Rangers"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

52nd REGIMENT INFANTRY--"GERMAN RANGERS," "SIGEL RIFLES."
Organized at New York City October 11, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., November 11, 1861. Attached to French's 3rd Brigade, Sumner's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Richardson's 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1864. Consolidated Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to November, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Moved to the Peninsula, Va., April 3. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Gaines Mill June 27. Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Alexandria and Centreville August 16-30. Cover Pope's retreat to Fairfax Court House September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of Antietam Creek September 15-16. Antietam September 17. Duty at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 22-October 29. Reconnoissance to Charlestown October 16-17. Advance up Loudoun Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 17. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth, Va., until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Auburn and Bristoe October 14. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. At Stevensburg until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Blood Angle" May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Reconnoissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Hatcher's Run or Boydton Road March 31. White Oak Road March 31. Sutherland Station and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville until May 2. March to Washington, D.C., May 2-15. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington, D.C., until July. Mustered out July 25, 1865. Regiment lost during service 14 Officers and 139 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 197 Enlisted men by disease. Total 350.

52nd REGIMENT NATIONAL GUARD INFANTRY. Organized for thirty days' service June 19, 1863. Left State for Harrisburg, Pa., June 22. Attached to 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of the Susquehanna. Skirmish at Oyster Point, Pa., June 28. Mustered out July 25, 1863.

53rd REGIMENT INFANTRY.--("D'EPINEUIL'S ZOUAVES.") Organized at New York City August 27 to November 15, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., November 18; then moved to Annapolis, Md. Attached to Parke's 3rd Brigade, Burnside's North Carolina Expeditionary Corps.

SERVICE--Duty at Annapolis, Md.,
until January 3, 1862. Burnside's Expedition to Hatteras Inlet and Roanoke Island, N. C., January 7-February 8. Vessel wrecked at Roanoke Island. A Detachment at battle of Roanoke Island, N. C., February 8. Duty at Fort Monroe, Va., Suffolk, Va., Annapolis, Md., and Washington, D.C., until March. Mustered out March 21, 1862, except Company "A," which was transferred to 17th New York Infantry as Company "G."

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 3 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 7 Enlisted men by disease. Total 11.

55th REGIMENT INFANTRY ("GARDE DE LAFAYETTE"). Organized at New York City and mustered in August 28, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 31, 1861. Duty at Fort Gaines, Md., September and October, 1861. Attached to Peck's Brigade, Buell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to December, 1862.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. March to Prospect Hill, Va., March 11-15. Moved to the Peninsula, Virginia, March 28. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Operations about Bottom's Bridge May 20-23. Battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks) May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-29. Duty in the defenses of Washington until October. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October-November. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Consolidated with 38th New York Infantry as Companies "G," "H," "I" and "K" December 21, 1862.

Regiment lost during service 33 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 29 Enlisted men by disease. Total 62.

Read About the 55th New York Infantry with the Battery at Fort Gaines, Tn (for your personal view only!)

56th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: ("10th LEGION"). Organized at Newburg, N.Y., and mustered in October 28, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., November 7, 1861. Attached to 1st Brigade, Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to December, 1862. Naglee's Brigade, Dept. of North Carolina, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to April, 1863. Stephenson's Brigade, Seabrook Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Morris Island, S.C., 10th Army Corps, July, 1863. Davis' Brigade, Folly Island, S.C., 10th Army Corps, to August, 1863. Saxton's Division, District of Beaufort, S.C., 10th Army Corps, to April, 1864. District of Beaufort, S.C., Dept. of the South, Northern District, Dept. of the South, to November, 1864. 1st Brigade, Coast Division, Dept. of the South, to January, 1865. 1st Separate Brigade, Morris Island, S.C., Dept. of the South, to March, 1865. 4th Separate Brigade, Dept. of the South, to July. 1865. 2nd Sub-District, District of Western South Carolina, to September, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Moved to Newport News, Va., March 28. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Operations about Bottom's Bridge May 20-23. Battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks) May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battle of Gaines Mill June 27. Bottom's Bridge June 28-29. White Oak Swamp June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Moved to Fortress Monroe, Va., August 16-22, then to Yorktown, Va. Duty there and at Gloucester Point until December 26. Action at Lee's Mills September 16. Reconnoissance to Gloucester and Matthews Counties December 11-15. Moved to Morehead City, N. C., December 26-January 1, 1863; then to Port Royal, S.C., January 28-31. At St. Helena Island, S.C., until March 27, and at Seabrook Island until July 6. Expedition to James Island July 9-16. Grimball's Landing, Secessionville, July 16. Siege of Fort Wagner, Morris Island, S.C., and operations against Fort Sumpter and Charleston until August. Duty in District of Beaufort, S.C., until September, 1864. Expedition to James Island, S.C., June 30-July 10, 1864. James Island July 4. John's Island July 9. Duty on Morris and Folly Islands, S.C.,. until November. Hatch's Expedition up Broad River November 28-30. Battle of Honey Hill November 30. Demonstration on Charleston and Savannah Railroad December 6-9. Deveaux's Neck December 6. Coosawhatchie December 9. Ordered to Morris Island January 18, 1865, and duty there until March 25. Potter's Expedition to Camden, S.C., April 5-25. Dingle's Mills April 9. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. Denkin's Mills and Beech Creek, near Statesburg, April 19. Duty in Northern and Western Districts of South Carolina until September. Mustered out October 17, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 63 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 213 Enlisted men by disease. Total 280.

56th New York, "A Condensed History of the Fifty Sixth Regiment New York Veteran Volunteer Infantry Which Was a Part of the Organization Known as the "Tenth Legion" in the Civil War, 1861-1865, Together with a Register or Roster of all the Members of the Regiment, and the War Record of Each Member as Recorded in the Adjutant General's Office at Albany, New York," by Joel C. Fish and William H. D. Blake. Originally published in 1906 by the Newburgh Journal Printing House, the valiant 56th New York fought at Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Gaines Mill, Secessionville, Fort Wagner, and other actions in South Carolina. 424 pages, this book may be hard to locate but if found, costs around $ 325.00.

56th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment Website - one of the best Regimental Websites on the Internet -- Check it out!

57th New York, "The Story of a Regiment, being a record of the Military Services of the Fifty-seventh New York, 1861-1865," by Gilbert Frederick, Chicago, Illinois. Originally published in 1895, this book may be hard to find.

57th New York, "One Surgeon's Private War," by Doctor William W. Potter of the 57th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, edited by John Michael Priest. Completed as a school project by high-school students under the guidance of their history teacher, this memoir brings alive some of the chaos and carnage of Civil War battles. From the Peninsula in 1862 to Petersburg in 1864, Dr. Potter recorded his observations, leaving us vivid images such as this event on the afternoon of July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, "I received word that General Samuel Zook had been grievously wounded and was being moved to a farm house on the Baltimore Pike. I immediately repaired to the place and discovered at once that he was fatally shot, a shell having torn open his left shoulder and chest, exposing heartbeats to observation." (Reviewed by the Civil War, the magazine of the Civil War Society, P.O. Box 770, Berryville, VA 22611). Cost $ 19.95.

59th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

59th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

60th New York, "History of the 60th New York State Volunteers,"by Richard Eddy. Orginally published in 1864, "This is a good regimental but is very difficult tofind. I've only seen it one other time. There is no reprint yet. The only flaw I see in this book is that the author was not present at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. This section appears as a supplement written by the Chaplain. If found expect to pay about 250 dollars." Thanks to Michael Nicosia, at Woodynails@aol.com for forwarding this info. to me.
Stan wants to "shag" all questions on this unit. Email Stan Maine now

61st New York, aka "the Clinton Guard"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

61st New York, "Personal Recollections of the War of 1861," by Charles A. Fuller. Foreword by Gregory Coco. This 136 page paperback 1995 reprint costs $ 15.00.

62nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment ("Anderson's Zouaves"): Organized at New York City and mustered in June 30, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 21, 1861. Attached to Defenses of Washington, D.C., to October, 1861. Pack's Brigade, Buell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to October, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to January, 1864. Wheaton's Brigade, Dept. of West Virginia, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah to July, 1865. Fort Schuyler, N.Y., to August, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. March to Prospect Hill, Va., March 11-15. Ordered to the Peninsula, Virginia, March 25. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Operations about Bottom's Bridge May 20-23. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battle of Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Alexandria August 16-September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17. At Downsville, Md., September 23 to October 20. Movement to Stafford Court House, Va., October 20-November 19, and to Belle Plains December 5. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April 27, 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Franklin's Crossing June 5-7. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Funkstown, Md., July 10-13. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty at Brandy Station and vicinity until May, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 17-18. Siege of Petersburg June 17-July 9. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23. Moved to Washington, D.C., July 9-11. Repulse of Early's attack on Fort Stevens and the Northern defenses of Washington July 11-12. Pursuit of Early July 14-21. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Gilbert's Ford, Opequan Creek, September 13. Battle of Winchester September 19. Strasburg September 21. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Petersburg, Va., December 9-12. Siege of Petersburg December 12, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Fort Fisher, Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Danville, Va., April 23-27, and duty there until May 24. March to Richmond, Va., then to Washington, D.C., May 24-June 3. Corps Review June 8. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until July, and Fort Schuyler, N.Y., until August 30. Mustered out August 30, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 85 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 82 Enlisted men by disease. Total 172.

63rd New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

63rd New York, "The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns," by David Power Conyngham. Written by a correspondent who had literary and political careers both in Ireland and America, this book gathers his writings about the 69th Regiment, a unit engaged in nearly every major action in the eastern theater during the Civil War. Coyningham's account is filled with stories of battle, wit and humor, and a great deal of biographical data about the men in the Regiment. The Irish Brigade was comprised of the 63rd, 69th, and the 88th New York, the 28th Massachusetts, and the 116th Pennsylvania. It saw heavy fighting at Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania. The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns also includes biographical sketches of brigade officers. Photos, index, originally published in 1867 by P. Donahoe, Boston, Massachusetts, an original copy may be hard to locate, but this 600 page book was reprinted in 1989 and sells for $ 30.00, and was reprinted again in 1994, retitled, "The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns, with and introduction by Lawrence Frederick Kohl, 616 pages, Fordham University Press, New York.

64th New York, aka "the Cattaragus Regiment"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

64th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment ("Cattaraugas Regiment"): Organized at Elmira, N.Y., September 10 to December 10, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., December 10, 1861. Attached to Casey's Provisional Division, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1862. Howard's Brigade, Sumner's Division. Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to August, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to April, 1863. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March. 1865. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Ordered to the Peninsula, Virginia, March. Siege of Yorktown April 16-May 4. Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Gaines' Mill June 27. Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp Bridge and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Moved to Fort Monroe, then to Alexandria and Centreville August 16-30. Cover retreat of Pope's army to Washington, D.C., August 31-September 2. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. At Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 22 to October 29. Reconnaissance to Charlestown October 16-17. Advance up Loudoun Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 17. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Duty at Falmouth until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-4. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Auburn and Bristoe October 14. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. At and near Stevensburg, Va.. until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spotsylvania May 8-12. Po River May 10. Spotsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient, or "Bloody Angle," May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Reconnaissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25, Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Hatcher's Run or Boydton Road March 29-31. White Oak Road March 31. Sutherland Station and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out July 14, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 13 Officers and 160 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 114 Enlisted men by disease. Total 292.

64th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

66th New York Volunteer Infantry ("GOVERNOR'S GUARD"): Organized at New York City and mustered in November 4, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., November 16. 1861. Attached to Graham's Brigade, Buell's Division. Army of the Potomac, to January, 1862. French's Brigade, Sumner's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to March, 1864. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1865. Fort Richardson, N.Y., to August, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10. Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula, March, 1862. Siege of Yorktown April 16-May 4. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Gaines' Mill June 27. Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Alexandria and Centreville August 16-30. Cover retreat of Pope's army to Washington, D.C., August 31-September 1. Battle of antietam, Md., September 16-17. Duty at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 22 to October 29. Reconnoissance to Charlestown October 16-17, Movement up Loudoun Valley and to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Duty at Falmouth, Va., until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-4. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Auburn and Bristoe October 14. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty at and near Stevensburg, Va., until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Po River May 10. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the <dy_1430> Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration on the north side of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration on north side of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Reconnoissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton and White Oak Roads March 29-31. Sutherland Station and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D. C, May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Moved to New York and duty at Fort Richmond, New York harbor, until August. Mustered out August 30, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 88 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 120 Enlisted men by disease. Total 221.

67th REGIMENT INFANTRY ("1st LONG ISLAND REGIMENT"): Organized at Brooklyn, N.Y., June 24, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 21, 1861. Attached to Graham's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Graham's Brigade, Buell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to April, 1864. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, to July, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, and Army of the Potomac, to September, 1864.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. March to Prospect Hill, Va., March 11-15. Ordered to the Peninsula, Va., March 25. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Alexandria August 16-September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 20. Movement to Stafford Court House, Va., October 20-November 19, and to Belle Plains December 5. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty at Johnson's Island, Lake Erie, Ohio, January to March, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 17-18. Siege of Petersburg June 17 to July 9. (Non-Veterans mustered out July 4, 1864.) Moved to Washington, D.C., July 9-11. Repulse of Early's attack on Fort Stevens and the Northern defenses of Washington July 11-12. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-September 1. Battalion consolidated with 65th Regiment New York Infantry September 1, 1864.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 96 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 75 Enlisted men by disease. Total 178.

68th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment--("CAMERON RIFLES." "2nd GERMAN RIFLE REGIMENT.") Organized at New York City August 1-20, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 24, 1861. Attached to Blenker's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Blenker's Brigade, Hooker's Division, Army of the Potomac, to November, 1861. Steinwehr's 2nd Brigade, Blenker's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Blenker's 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Blenker's Division, Mountain Department, to June, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to July, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 11th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 11th Army Corps, to October, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April, 1864. Unattached, 4th Division, 20th Army Corps, to July, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Defenses of Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, to December, 1864. Unattached, District of the Etowah, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Separate Division, District of the Etowah, to July, 1865. District of Allatoona, Ga., to November, 1865. District of Savannah, Ga., to November, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until April, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Movement to Winchester, Va., April 5-18. Operations in the Shenandoah Valley until June. Battle of Cross Keys June 8. Duty at Sperryville July 7 to August 8. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington until November 1. Movement to Centreville November 1-18. Advance to Fredericksburg, Va., December 9-16. At Stafford Court House until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Guard duty along Orange & Alexandria Railroad until September. Movement to Bridgeport, Ala., September 24-October 3. Operations in Lookout Valley, Tenn., October 19-26. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battle of Wauhatchie, Tenn., October 28-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Orchard Knob November 23. Tunnel Hill November 24-25. Mission Ridge November 25. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 17. Assigned to Railroad Guard and garrison duty in the District of Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, until July, 1865. Elrod's Tan Yard January 27, 1865 (Detachment). Skirmish at Ladd's House, Hog Jaw Valley, February 3-4 (Detachment). Skirmish at Johnson's Crook.February 10. Duty in District of Allatoona, Ga., until November, 1865, and at Savannah, Ga., November, 1865. Mustered out November 30, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 38 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 74 Enlisted men by disease. Total 118.

69th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

69th New York, "Remember Fontenoy!, the 69th New York and the Irish Brigade in the Civil War," by Joseph G. Bilby. A complete combat history of this brigade with many anecdotes and personal histories. With the sprigs of green boxwood in their caps, the men of the Irish Brigade rushed toward the stone wall below Marye's Heights at Fredericksburg and into a maelstrom of enemy fire, securing their fame as one of the best brigades in the Army of the Potomac. Renowned for its hard fighting ability, the unit, which was mostly armed with smoothbores, was featured in close combat situations during the Peninsula Campaign, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and actions around Petersburg through to Appomattox. The colorful reputation of the men enhanced their impetuous fighting qualities in the field to make the Irish Brigade one of the most popular units then, as well as now. Bilby treats the Irish Brigade, consisting of the 69th New York and its progenies, the 63rd and 88th New York, 28th Massachusetts, and 116th Pennsylvania, in a fast-paced account consisting of 134 pages. Its. Irish-born commander, Thomas F. Meagher, is highlighted. The substantive remainder of the books consists of a biographical sketch of Meagher, company ordnance reports of small arms used by the regiments, together with a photo gallery of more than 50 full page period images of individuals and flags. Some photos of modern day Irish Brigade reenactors are also included. The general discussion of the role of the brigade in each of its battle is well-done, with a judicious blending of short first-hand anecdotes that don't become obtrusive to the flow of the story. Despite adequate research, the tone is not stilted or scholarly which would otherwise make the book less enjoyable. In short, it is a pleasure to read.... The contributions of immigrants to the development of this country is a common theme. In the case of the Irish, many of Meagher's men paid the supreme sacrifice to forge a better life for their people in this newly adopted land. (Reviewed by Frank J. Platek, for the Civil War News, April, 1996). Released in 1995, 270 pages, maps, unit flags, cost $ 31.00, from the Longstreet House, P.O. Box 730, Highstown, NJ 08520.

69th New York, "The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns," by David Power Conyngham. Written by a correspondent who had literary and political careers both in Ireland and America, this book gathers his writings about the 69th Regiment, a unit engaged in nearly every major action in the eastern theater during the Civil War. Coyningham's account is filled with stories of battle, wit and humor, and a great deal of biographical data about the men in the Regiment. The Irish Brigade was comprised of the 63rd, 69th, and the 88th New York, the 28th Massachusetts, and the 116th Pennsylvania. It saw heavy fighting at Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania. The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns also includes biographical sketches of brigade officers. Photos, index, this 600 page 1989 release sells for $ 30.00.

The Irish Brigade Association, including the 69th New York Regiment

70th New York, aka "the First Excelsior"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

71st New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment--("2nd EXCELSIOR.") Organized under authority of the War Department at Camp Scott, Staten Island, N.Y., as 2nd Regiment, Sickles' Brigade, June, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., July 23, 1861. Attached to Sickles' Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sickles' Brigade, Hooker's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1864.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. Expedition to Lower Maryland September 15-October 2, 1861. Expedition to Matthias Point November 9. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10, 1862. Expedition from Dumfries to Fredericksburg, Va., and capture of stores March 18. Reconnoissance from Liverpool Point to Stafford Court House and action at Stafford Court House April 4. Ordered to the Peninsula, Va., April. Siege of Yorktown April 10-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove June 25; Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29; White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30; Malvern Hill July 1 and August 5. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-26. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Action at Bristoe Station or Kettle Run August 27. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30. Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until November. At Fairfax Station to November 25. Operations on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad November 10-12. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Operations at Rappahannock Bridge and Grove Church February 5-7. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Wapping Heights July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly's Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne's Farm November 27. Duty near Brandy Station, Va., until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16-July 7. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 120th Regiment, New York Infantry, July 7. Regiment mustered out at New York City July 30, 1864, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 83 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 73 Enlisted men by disease. Total 163.

71st Regiment New York State Militia Infantry:. Organized for three months' United States service April 10, 1861. Left New York for Annapolis, Md., April 21, 1861, arriving there April 24; then marched to Washington, D.C., April 25 and assigned to duty at the Navy Yard. Mustered into United States service April 30. Attached to Mansfield's Command until June. Burnside's Brigade, Hunter's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to July.

SERVICE.--Occupation of Alexandria, Va., May 24. Attack on Batteries at Aquia Creek May 31 and June 1. Attack on Matthias Point June 27. Performed escort duty at the funerals of Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth and Captain Ward, United States Navy. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21. Action at Sudley Springs July 21. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Volunteered to build and man Batteries beyond Alexandria. Mustered out July 30, 1861.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 14 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Office and 4 Enlisted men by disease. Total 20.

71st New York Regiment National Guard Infantry: Mustered in for three months' United States service May 12, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., May 28. Attached to Sturgis' Command, Military District of Washington, and duty in the defenses of that city until September. Mustered out September 2, 1862. Again mustered for 30 days' United States service June 17, 1863. Left State for Harrisburg, Pa., June 18. Attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of the Susquehanna. Skirmish at Kingston June 25. Oyster Point June 28-29, near Harrisburg, June 29. Mustered out June 22, 1863.

72nd New York, aka "the Third Excelsior"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

72nd New York, "History of the Seventy-Second Regiment New York Volunteers," by Henri LeFevre Brown. This book may prove very difficult to locate. Thanks to Phil Palen, Gowanda, NY for submitting this info. to me.

72nd New York Regiment Volunteer Re-enactor's Infantry (Third Excelsior Regiment) Website

73rd New York, aka "the Fourth Excelsior"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

73rd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment ("4th Excelsior"): Organized under authority of the War Department, at Camp Scott, Staten Island, N.Y., as 4th Regiment, Sickles' Brigade, July to October, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., October 8, 1861. Attached to Sickles' Brigade, Division of the Potomac, October, 1861. Sickles' Brigade, Hooker's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C, until March, 1862. Expedition to Matthias Point November 9, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10, 1862. Expedition from Dumfries to Fredericksburg and capture of stores March 18. Reconnaissance from Liverpool Point to Stafford Court House and action at Stafford Court House April 4. Ordered to the Peninsula April. Siege of Yorktown April 10-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove June 25; Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29; White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30; Malvern Hill July 1 and August 5. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville, August 16-26. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Action at Bristoe Station or Kettle Run August 27. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington until November. At Fairfax Station Va., until November 25. Operations on Orange & Alexandria Railroad November 10-12. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Operations at Rappahannock Bridge and Grove Church February 5-7. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Wapping Heights, Va.. July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly's Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne's Farm November 27. Duty near Brandy Station, Va., until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spotsylvania May 8-12. Po River May 10. Spotsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad. June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration on North side of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration on North side of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road. Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Reconnaissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton Road and White Oak Ridge March 29-31. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out at Washington, D.C., June 29, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 18 Officers and 138 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 76 Enlisted men by disease. Total 233.

74th New York, aka "the Fifth Excelsior"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

75th New York Infantry, "Cayuga in the Field," by Henry Hall and James Hall. "This is actually two different books binded together and interestingly enough, it was originally published in 1873 that way. The first book is a record of the 19th New York Volunteers and all the batteries of the 3rd New York Artillery and is 316 pages long. The 2nd book is a record of the 75th New York Volunteer Infantry and is 270 pages long. I have a reprint of this because whenever I found an original, it was in poor condition. The reprint cost about 35 dollars while the original can cost up 300 dollars depending on the condition." Again thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for his special expertise in New York Regimentals and forwarding this info. to me for use on my website.

75th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

76th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

76th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry: ("COURTLAND COUNTY REGIMENT.") Organized at Courtland and Albany, N.Y., and mustered in January 16, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., January 17, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Wadsworth's Command, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. Doubleday's Brigade, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 5th Army Corps, to August, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to January, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the defenses of Washington D.C., until May, 1862. Duty at and near Fredericksburg, Va., until August. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 20-23. Battles of Gainesville August 2 Groveton August 29, Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. At Sharpsburg, Md., until October 29. Advance to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth and Belle Plains until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Pollock's Mill Creek April 29-May 2. Battle of Chancellorsville May 2-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Laurel Hill May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Ford May 23. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to January 28, 1865. Weldon Railroad August 18-21, 1864. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Hicksford Raid December 7-11. Companies mustered out as follows: Companies "B," "F" and "K" July 1, 1864; Company "A" October 11; Company "G" October 20; Company "C" November 8; Company "E" November 18; Company "I" December 1, 1864; Company "H" January 1, 1865; Company "D" and Veterans and Recruits transferred to 147th Regiment, New York Infantry, January 28, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 12 Officers and 161 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 156 Enlisted men by disease. Total 330.

76th New York, "History of the Seventy-sixth Regiment New York Volunteers; What it endured and Accomplished," by A.P. Smith, Cortland, New York. Originally published in 1867. The 76th New York suffered 150 casualties during the 2nd Manassas Campaign. On the first day at Gettysburg, this regiment entered the battle with 375 men and officers and within one half hour lost 234 men, including Major A.J. Grover, who was killed in command of the regiment. The 76th New York lost 5 color bearers and over 280 men in the Wilderness. They fought as part of Cutler's Brigade, Wadsworth's Division, Reynolds' First U.S. Army Corps; later they served with Rice's Brigade, Warren 5th U.S. Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. Includes the biographical sketches of 53 Regimental Officers. 429 pages, with line drawings of officers, roster, cost $ 35.00

76th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

77th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment ("Bemis Heights Regimentt"). Organized at Saratoga, N.Y., and mustered in November 22, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., November 28, 1861. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10. Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula March 22. Near Lee's Mills April 5. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Lee's Mills April 16. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Mechanicsville May 23-24 and June 24. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Garnett's Farm June 27. Garnett's and Golding's Farms June 28. Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville, August 16-28. In works at Centreville August 28-31. Assist in checking Pope's rout at Bull Run August 30, and cover retreat to Fairfax Court House September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Crampton's Pass, South Mountain, September 14. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Union November 2-3. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Deep Run Ravine June 5-13. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12: Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 17-18. Siege of Petersburg June 17 to July 9. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23. Moved to Washington, D.C., July 9-11. Repulse of Early's attack on Fort Stevens and the northern defenses of Washington July 11-12. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Gilbert's Ford, Opequan Creek, September 13. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Washington, D.C., then to Petersburg, Va., December 13-16. Siege of Petersburg December 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Fort Fisher, Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Danville April 23-27, and duty there until May 24. March to Richmond, Va., then to Washington, D.C., May 24-June 3. Corps Review June 8. Mustered out June 27, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 87 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 175 Enlisted men by disease. Total 273.

77th New York Regiment National Guard Infantry:. Organized for 100 days August 2, 1864. Duty at Elmira, N. Y., until November 2. Mustered out November 19, 1864.

77th New York, " Battles of the Seventy-seventh New York State Foot Volunteers," by Edward Fuller. Originally published in 1901, this book may prove hard to find.
William Richards Residence not listed; 44 years old. Enlisted on 9/11/1862 at Saratoga Springs, NY as a Private. On 9/17/1862 he mustered into "K" Co. NY 77th Infantry He died of disease on 1/17/1863 at Harewood Hosp, Washington, DC

77th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment," by Robert Morrow White Mane 273 pages. Costs $29.95. Thanks to James Sontag for providing me this information to add to my website. Thanks James!

77th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

Another 77th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

78th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website - Cameron Highlanders

79th New York, aka "the Highlanders"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

79th New York, "The Seventy-ninth Highlanders, New York Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865," by William Todd. Originally published in 1886 by the Press of Brandow, Barton & Company, Albany, NY. An early reviewer went on to write, "an excellent regimental history based on numerous letters, diaries, and similar records; the units' principal campaigns were in Virginia." Check local libraries for inter-library loan. Todd was a member of the 79th, and provides an interesting perspective. It is also one of the great debunkers of many of the myths surrounding the 79th (he is very clear that kilts were not worn at Bull Run or later). "The book is very thorough, and very readable. I highly recommend it to anyone who has an interest in the 79th)." Thanks to Steve Pelikan, a Civil War Re-enactor with the 79th NYVI, NCWA for submitting a large portion of the above information to me. If you happen across an original copy from 1886, you may expect to pay around $ 325.00. Reprint, 513 pages, cost $ 49.50.

79th New York, "Blue Bonnets O-er the Border - The Seventy-ninth New York Cameron Highlanders," by William M. McKnight. The Scottish members of the 79th New York Highlanders fought at First and Second Bull Run, Chanuntily, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and the Carolinas. They went on to fight with General Ulysses S. Grant at Vicksburg, in Tennessee, and at the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania. 200 pages, with illustrations, this recent publication by White Mane costs around
$ 25.00.

79th New York, "Him on One Side and Me on the Other," by Terry A Johnston. "A collection of letters from the Campbell brothers. Alexander fought in the 79 New York Volunteer Infantry and James fought for the 1st South Carolina battalion. The book is mainly about the highlanders featuring more than 60 letters describing many of the early battles that Alexander and the highlander took part in. Both brothers faced each other in the Battle of Secessionville. This book is very interesting because the author leaves all the misspellings and punctuation problems in the text and it somehow adds to the reading. I read it and enjoyed it and highly recommend it as Alexander had no love for war and really did not want to even be in it. He was wounded at second Bull Run and eventually discharged because of his wounds. James was captured at Battery Wagner and sat out the rest of the war." Thanks to Mike Nicosia for forwarding this info. to me.

79th New York, "History of The Seventy-ninth New York Cameron Highlanders 1859-1876: With a Treatise on the Uniform and Equipment," by William Arly Beard III; Strawberry Plains Press 1996. The book is available directly for Strawberry Plains Press 701 Beard Rd. Strawberry Plains, TN 37871. The cost of the book is $ 12.00 plus $ 3.00 Shipping via Priority mail. The book is 60 pages with 43 illustrations. The book contains a concise history, a uniform treatise, and the complete roster for the original 795 men and officers who departed New York for the defense of Washington on June 2, 1861.

79th New York, "Blue Springs: A History of the Desperate Battles at Blue Springs for the Control Upper East Tennessee During the Civil War," by William Arly Beard III; Strawberry Plains Press 1997. The book costs
$ 15.00 plus $ 3.00 shipping via Priority mail. Strawberry Plains Press 693 Beard Rd. Strawberry Plains, TN 37871.
Blue Spring is this past years book effort by William Beard. The book is a study of the control of the "Arch of the Confederacy". The work contains 115 page with 46 photographs 5 maps. One previously unpublished photograph is of Gen. Burnside taken in Knoxville during the liberation of the city following two years of Confederate occupation.
The Battle of Blue Springs October 10, 1863 was a Confederate diversion to allow the forces waiting in southwest Virginia to retake the Cumberland Gap. C.S.A. General Williams did not know the plan to take the gap had dissolved after he had begun to draw the Federals into action at Blue Springs. General Williams, CSA was left to face Burnside's army of the 9th and 23rd corps totaling 26,000 men in East Tennessee. Willams' force was no larger than 1,700 men as he was only a diversion to take pressure off of Cumberland Gap to ensure a Confederate victory. The plan to take the gap now lost, General Williams does not know he is left as the only combatant against a superior Federal force.
The 79th was heavily engaged in the battle of Blue Spring [October 10,1863] with the main assault being spearheaded by the 79th New York. Their Colonel David Morrison was the commander of the First Brigade of the Ninth Army Corp's First Division. The First Brigade during the battle consisted of the 36th Mass, 8th Mich, 79th New York, and the 45th Penn. The 79th suffered 18 men wounded 3 mortally during their days fighting; this with fewer than 180 total 79th troops in all in East Tennessee."
I highly recommend the purchase of this book; this book shows character; Mr. Beard's enthusiasm for this topic runs rich and deep. (Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website).

 79th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

(Another) 79th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

80th New York, aka "the Ulster Guard"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

80th New York Volunter Infantry Regiment--("ULSTER GUARD." "20th REGIMENT STATE MILITIA INFANTRY.") Tendered services to Government February, 1861. Organized at Kingston, N.Y., from 20th Regiment State Militia Infantry and mustered in September 20 to October 20, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., October 26. Designated 80th New York Infantry December 7, 1861. Attached to Wadsworth's Brigade, McDowell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Patrick's 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1862. 2nd Brigade, King's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. Patrick's Command, Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, to July, 1863. Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1864. City Point, Va., Provost Guard Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1865. Independent Brigade, 9th Army Corps, to April, 1865. Richmond, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to November, 1865. Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to January, 1866.

SERVICE.--Duty at Upton's Hill, defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. McDowell's advance on Falmouth, Va., April 4-19. Occupation of Fredericksburg until May 25. McDowell's advance on Richmond May 26-29. Duty at Fredericksburg until August. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 20-23. Beverly Ford August 20. Sulphur Springs August 26. Battles of Gainesville August 28; Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30; Chanuntily September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. At Sharpsburg, Md., until October 20. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 20-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Duty at Hall's Landing December 20, 1862, to January 7, 1863. Provost Guard duty at Aquia Creek and along Richmond and Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad until June 27. Relieved and ordered to join 1st Army Corps June 27. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Provost Guard duty, Army of the Potomac, July 16, 1863, to June 18, 1864. Participating in the Bristoe Campaign October 9-22, 1863. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15, 1864. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21; North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Assigned to garrison and guard duty at City Point, Va., Headquarters of the Army, June 18, 1864, to April 14, 1865. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Occupation of Petersburg April 3. Provost duty at Richmond April 14 to November 27, 1865, and at Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., until January 29, 1866. Mustered out January 29, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 120 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 157 Enlisted men by disease. Total 285.

81st New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

81st New York, "Random Sketches and Wandering Thoughts: Info: Personal Narratives. What I saw in Camp, on the March, the Bivouac, the Battlefield, and Hostel, while in the Army in Virginia, North and South Carolina, during the Late Rebellion, with A Historical Sketch of the Second Oswego Regiment, Eighty-first New York State Volunteers," by Bartholonew S. De Forest. Originally published in 1866, by Herrick Publishing, this book is rare and quite difficult to locate. One is located at the Pratt Library in Baltimore, Md. (The book is falling a part and fragile) The second book is apparently located at the Unv. of Maryland Library. (thanks to Scout10520@aol.com for providing to this info. to me).

Update: !! Be advised that another copy is at the Onondaga Public Library in Syracuse, NY. It is in tough shape and is kept in a special place to be viewed and perused only by select persons. Submitted by 81st NYVI researching author James Schneck

82nd New York, aka "the Second New York State Militia"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

83rd New York, aka "the Ninth Militia"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

83rd New York, "Three Years' Campaign of the Ninth N.Y.S.M during the Southern Rebellion (Eighty-third New York Infantry," by John W. Jaques. Originally published in 1865, at New York, New York, this book may be hard to find. 247 page reprint costs $ 32.00.

83rd New York, "History of the Ninth Regiment New York State Militia, N.G.S., New York (Eighty-third New York Volunteers) 1845-1888," by William Todd and George A. Hussey. Originally published in 1889, at New York, New York, this book may be hard to find. 737 pages, with illustrations and maps, reprint costs $ 68.00.

83rd New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

84th New York, aka "the Fourteenth Brooklyn Regiment"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

84th New York, see "The History of the Fighting Fourteenth Brooklyn State Militia," by D.R. Marquis and Charles Tevis above

85th New York, "Charlie Mosher's Civil War: From Fair Oaks to Andersonville with the Plymouth Pilgrims, a History of the 85th New York Infantry," by Wayne Mahood, Longstreet House, P.O. Box 730 Highstown, NJ, 08520. "The cyclical surges in Civil War popularity usually bring about a matching rush of books. One quick way to get a book on the market is to publish a set of soldier's letters or diaries-this certainly does not take the multiple years needed for a top-notch biography, battle study or regimental history. So one can warily approach some of these diaries/journals, with the telling question is this truly of value? Certainly Wayne Mahood can't be accused of going the fast-and-easy route. He had used Charlie Mosher's diary as a wellspring for his earlier regimental history of the 85th New York. Are Mosher's diaries of value? ...he is bluntly honest, highly literate, a skilled writer and a colorful story teller. From Mosher's descriptive writings you get a marvelous picture of what it was like to be a private in the Union Army....You do not have to be a follower of the 85th, a researcher of the North Carolina Campaigns in which they served, or have an interest in Civil War prisons in order to enjoy this book. (partial review by Brian Bennett for the Civil War Courier). 1992 reprint, 378 pages, cost $ 30.00.

85th New York, "Escape from Dixie: The Experiences of Lieutenant John Lafler, Eighty-Fifth New York, Civil War Prisoner of War," by John Ball. Published in 1996 by Goldstar Enterprises, P.O. Box 363, Williamsville, NY, 14231. Includes Biographical sketches, letters, pictures and bibliography, this 109 page paperback is the story of the character of John Ball's forefather, John Lafler, as Mr. Lafler refuses to accept his fate as a Prisoner of War, and strives to escape; escapes.. is captured.. escapes again from another Reb prison, is re-captured in enemy territory.. and again plots his way out of captivity, eventually achieving freedom, ironically, what the Confederate States of America could never accomplish. Be forewarned that this is not a regimental history of the 85th New York (Lafler was pre-occupied plotting to gain his freedom and wasn't around to partake in the 85th's saga); instead John Ball concentrates on the writings of his ancestor's diary to generate this book. Relying on ggpappy's diary, at times the book lacks the ability to fully describe the events taking place, prominently focusing on diary entries, gaps are left unfilled in the overall string of personal events; which is expected when dealing with a single individual's experiences that occurred over 130+ years ago. (Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, 4/27/98, the owner of this website).

85th NY Volunteer Infantry Website

86th New York, aka "the Steuben Rangers"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

86th Regiment of New York Volunteer Infantry--("aka Steuben Rangers.") Organized at Elmira and mustered in November 20, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., November 23, 1861. Attached to 2nd Brigade, Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Wadsworth's Command, Military District of Washington, to August, 1862. Piatt's Brigade, Whipple's Division, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D. C.. until August, 1862. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Duty in the defenses of Washington until October. Moved to Point of Rocks, then to Pleasant Valley, Md., October 18-19. Movement toward Warrenton, Va., October 24-November 16. Reconnoissance to Manassas Gap, Va., and skirmish November 5-6. Movement to Falmouth, Va., November 18-24. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Duty near Falmouth until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Brandy Station and Beverly Ford June 9. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly's Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Batties of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient, "Bloody Angle," May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Reconnoissance to Weldon Railroad December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton and White Oak Roads March 29-31. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville until May 2. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 27, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 13 Officers and 159 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 129 Enlisted men by disease. Total 303.

Hi, this message addressed to Ronald Mosocco, I wanted to let Ron know I received documents from National Archives on Pvt. James William Chaffee, 86th Regiment NY Volunteers, Company A, Infantry [Stueben's Rangers]. So I wrote a small report about all the info I have in my genealogicial records about James. I am attaching with email. Please make sure Ron sees the info and if you guys want a copy of records, let me know. There will be 3 pages. Thanks very much. Take care. Sincerely, Terry William Chaffee zip file by clicking here

87th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment - ("13th Brooklyn") Organized at Brooklyn, N.Y., and mustered in November 20, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., December 2, 1861. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to September, 1862.

SERVICE - Duty in the Dept. of Washington until March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Ordered to the Peninsula, Va., March 17. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Skirmish at Yorktown April 11. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battle of Oak Grove June 25. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-26. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Action at Bristoe Station or Kettle Run August 27. Buckland's Bridge, Broad Run, August 27. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30; Chanuntily September 1. Consolidated with 40th Regiment New York Infantry September 6, 1862. Company "B" transferred to 173rd New York Infantry September 11, 1862.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 22 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 26 Enlisted men by disease. Total 49.

88th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

88th New York, "The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns," by David Power Conyngham. Written by a correspondent who had literary and political careers both in Ireland and America, this book gathers his writings about the 69th Regiment, a unit engaged in nearly every major action in the eastern theater during the Civil War. Coyningham's account is filled with stories of battle, wit and humor, and a great deal of biographical data about the men in the Regiment. The Irish Brigade was comprised of the 63rd, 69th, and the 88th New York, the 28th Massachusetts, and the 116th Pennsylvania. It saw heavy fighting at Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania. The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns also includes biographical sketches of brigade officers. Photos, index, this 600 page 1989 release sells for
$ 30.00. Thanks to Mike Nicosia for forwarding this info. to me.

88th New York Volunteers Infantry, "Memoirs of Chaplain life - Father William Corby.". At the start of the he enlisted from Notre-Dame in the Eighty-eighth New York infantry which belonged to the Irish Brigade. He was constantly putting himself in danger by either absolving them of their sins before going into battle or giving medical help to the wounded. A monument is dedicated to him at Gettysburg for giving pennance just before they went into battle at the wheatfield. Hancock made everybody catholic or not take their hats off. This is a very interesting book and definately one of the better books written by chaplins. There is a reprint of this book available. The original would cost approximately 150 dollars.

89th New York, "The Civil War Letters of William A. Robinson and the Full Story of the Eighty-ninth New York Volunteer Infantry," by William A. Robinson. Published by Heritage Books, this 193 page paperback with index, bibliography and illustrations, costs $ 20.00.

89th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

90th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: Organized by the consolidation of the McClellan Chasseurs and McClellan Rifles at New York City November and December, 1861. Left State for Key West, Fla., January 5, 1862. Attached to Brannan's Florida Expedion to March, 1862. District of Key West, Dept. of the South, to August, 1862. District of Key West, Fla., Dept. of the Gulf, to November, 1862. District of Beaufort, S.C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to March, 1863. District of Key West, Fla., Dept. of the Gulf, April, 1863. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to February, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to July, 1864, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 19th Army Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 1st Division (Provisional), Army of the Shenandoah, to April, 1865. 1st Brigade, Dwight's Division, Dept. of Washington, D.C., to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, Dwight's Division, District of Savannah, Ga., Dept. of the South, to July, 1865. District of Georgia, Dept. of the South, to February, 1866.

SERVICE--Duty at Key West, Fla., until November, 1862; then in District of Beaufort, S.C. Ordered t New Orleans, La., April, 1863. Expedition from Barrie's Landing toward Berwick City May 21-26. Action at Franklin May 25. Moved to Algiers, then to Port Hudson May 26-June 3. Siege of Port Hudson June 3-July 9. Assault on Port Hudson June 14. Surrender of Port Hudson July 9. Kock's Plantation, Donaldsonville, Bayou LaFourche, July 12-13. Duty in the Defense of New Orleans, La., until April, 1864. Moved to Alexandria, La. Red River Campaign April 30-May 22. Construction of dam at Alexandria April 30-May 10. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. At Morganza until July. Moved to New Orleans, then to Fortress Monroe, Va., and Washington, D.C., July 3-28. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. At Winchester, Stephenson's Depot and Kernstown until April, 1865. Moved to Washington, D.C., April 21-22, and duty there until June 1. Grand Review May 23-24. Moved to Savannah, Ga., June 2-6. Duty there and at Hawkinsville, Ga., until February 1866. Mustered out February 9, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 7 Officers and 181 Enlisted men by disease. Total 248.

91st New York Regiment, "Who Would Not be a Soldier - The Civil War Letters of Edmund A. Wilcox, Company C, of the Ninety First New York Volunteer Infantry," edited by Margaret Wilcox Kellner and Bruce Kellner. Published in 1998 by Heirloom Publishing, 3238 Brick Schoolhouse Road, Hamlin, New York. "This series of eighteen letters written by a young soldier in a New York regiment during the last years of the Civil War gives the reader stark insight to the daily lives the soldier led during that conflict. Stationed variously at Harts Island, City Point, Harpers Ferry and Fort McHenry (where he spent some six months) Edmund Wilcox would go on to fight in the Battle of Five Forks and participate in the combat that took place in and around Hatchers' Run near Petersburg, Virginia. Throughout all these events, Edmund Wilcox presents a picture that is at time bleak and poignant -- such as his portrayal of captured Confederate soldiers returning from Harpers' Ferry - while at others it is filled with pride and amazement - as in his description of the events surrounding his sighting of General Robert Edward Lee. But most of all, it is replete with all the myriad detail of a young soldier who is far from home, and whose future - even after the Union's victory - remains uncertain. 51 pages, this book may prove confusing to those unfamiliar with uncensored Civil War diaries..... so be it. [Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website]. Caution in purchasing this book is in order. But barring this, if you have an interest in this unit, pick up a copy for          $ 10.00 by calling 716-964-8683 or e-mailing pmarchan@brockport.edu

91st New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website - check out the music too!

92nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: Organized at Potsdam, N.Y., and mustered in January 1, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., March 5, 1862, Attached to 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to September, 1862. Wessell's Brigade, Division of Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to December, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to May, 1863. Lee's Brigade, defenses of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of North Carolina, to August. 1863. Sub-District of the Albemarle District of North Carolina, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to April, 1864. Palmer's Brigade, Peck's Division, 18th Army Corps, April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, to December, 1864.

SERVICE:--Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15, 1862. Ordered to the Peninsula, Virginia, March 28. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Reconnoissance toward Lee's Mills April 29. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Operations about Bottom's Bridge May 21-23. Near Seven Pines May 29-30. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. New Market Road June 8. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Bottom's Bridge June 27-28. White Oak Swamp June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Moved to Fortress Monroe August 16-23. Duty there until September 18. Moved to Suffolk, Va., September 18, and duty there until December. Reconnoissance to Franklin October 3. Affairs on the Blackwater October 9, 26, 29 and 30. Franklin October 31. Ordered to New Berne, N. C., December 4. Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro, N. C., December 11-20. Actions at Kinston March 14; Whitehall December 16; Goldsboro December 17. Duty at and near New Berne until April, 1864. Operations against Whiting January 18-February 10. Fort Anderson March 14, 1863. Expedition to relief of Little Washington April 7-10. Beech Grove and Batchelor's Creek, near New Berne, February 1-3, 1864. Ordered to Yorktown, Va., April 28, 1864. Butler's operations on south side of the James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of City Point and Bermuda Hundred May 5. Swift Creek or Arrowfield Church May 8-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-27. Moved to White House, then to Cold Harbor, May 27-31. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Wier Bottom Church June 20. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16 to December 1, 1864. Hare's House June 24 and 28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Duty in the trenches before Petersburg and on the Bermuda front until September 26. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights. September 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Duty in trenches before Richmond north of the James River until December. Consolidated with 96th Regiment New York Infantry December 1, 1864. Old members mustered out January 7, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 67 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 115 Enlisted men by disease. Total 185.

93rd New York, aka "the Morgan Rifles"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

93rd New York Regiment, "History of the Ninety-Third Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865," by David H. King. Originally published in 1895 by the Swain & Tate Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, this book may be hard to locate.

96th REGIMENT INFANTRY ("McCOMB'S PLATTS- BURG REGIMENT"): Organized at Plattsburg, N.Y., February 20-March 7, 1862. Left New York State for Washington, D.C., March 11, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to September, 1862. Wessell's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to December, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to May, 1863. District of the Albemarle, Dept. of North Carolina, to October, 1863. Newport News, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to December, 1863. District of the Currituck, Dept. of Virginia <dy_1443> and North Carolina, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, Heckman's Division, 18th Army Corps, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, Army of the James, to July, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 24th Army Corps, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 24th Army Corps, to July, 1865. 1st Independent Brigade, 24th Army Corps, to August, 1865. Dept. of Virginia to February, 1866.

SERVICE--Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula March 28, 1862. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Seven Pines May 29. Fair Oaks May 30. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31- June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Bottom's Bridge June 27-29. White Oak Swamp June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Moved to Fortress Monroe August 16-23, then to Suffolk September 18, and duty there until December. Reconnoissance to Franklin on the Blackwater October 3. Ordered to New Berne, N. C., December 4. Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro December 11-20. Actions at Kinston December 14; Whitehall December 16; Goldsboro December 17. Duty at and in the vicinity of New Berne, N. C., until May, 1863. At Plymouth, N. C., and in the District of the Albemarle until October, 1863. Expedition for the relief of Little Washington April 7-10. Expedition from Plymouth to Gardiner's Bridge and Williamston July 5-7 (Detachment). Expedition from Plymouth to Foster's Mills July 26-29. Moved to Newport News, Va., October, and duty there until December. Scout from Great Bridge to Indiantown, N. C., October 13. Duty in District of the Currituck until April, 1864. Ordered to Yorktown, Va., April 28. Butler's operations on south side of the James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of Bermuda Hundred and City Point, Va., May 5. Swift Creek or Arrow field Church May 8-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-27. Moved to White House, then to Cold Harbor May 27-31. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Mine Explosion. Petersburg, July 30, 1864 (Reserve). In trenches before Petersburg and on the Bermuda front until September 26. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Duty in trenches before Richmond until April. 1865. Occupation of Richmond April 3. Duty in the Dept. of Virginia until February, 1866. Mustered out at City Point, Va., February 6, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 59 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 158 Enlisted men by disease. Total 228.

97th New York, aka "the Conkling Rifles"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

97th New York, "History of the Ninety-seventh Regiment New York Volunteers (Conkling Rifles), in the War for the Union," by Isaac Hall. Originally published in 1890 by L.C. Childs & Son, Utica, New York, this regiment was comprised of boys from Oneida and Herkimer Counties, New York. It saw its first action in 1862 at Cedar Mountain and at the Rappahannock under Duryee's Brigade, and went on to participate in most of the military engagements in the Eastern Theater of war, most notably at Gettysburg at part of Baxter's Brigade, where they were positioned at the northern part of Seminary Ridge, it held the right flank of the 1st Union Corps, defeating Iverson's Confederates; later transferred to the 5th US Army Corps in 1864, the unit lost heavily at the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania. Reprinted in 1991 by Butternut and Blue, with 477 pages, maps, roster, costs $ 35.00

97th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

98th New York Regiment, "The Ninety-Eighth New York Volunteers in the War of 1861," by William Kreutzer, Philadelphia, PA. Originally published in 1878, this book may be hard to find.

99th New York Regiment, "History of the Ninety-Ninth New York Volunteers," by Philip Correl. Originally published in 1905, "this book deals with a group of men mostly from New York City, although one company was from Jersey, that were sailors. The unit saw action on the Carolinas at New Bern, one company took part in the Burnside Expedition and was on the ship Congress when the C.S.S Virginia had its showdown with the Monitor. They were also part of the second Peninsula Campaign as infantry. Many were captured and over 60 members are buried at Andersonville. This is a very colorful unit that saw lots of adventure in gunboats and various daring expeditions. The book is a very limited publishing. To the best of my knowledge only 73 copies were published. One is available for 1,750 dollars but that's just a little of out my price range". 250 pages. Thanks once again to Woodynails@aol.com for providing this information to me for use on my website.

99th New York Infantry Regiment: (Union Coast Guard): Organized at at New York City under authority of War Department as Naval Brigade, to be provided with Gunboats to cruise along Atlantic coast, May 28, 1861. Left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., May 28, 1861. Attached to Fortress Monroe and Camp Hamilton, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of Virginia, May, 1862. Camp Hamilton, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1862. Viele's Command, Norfolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to February, 1863. Terry's Provisional Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, to April, 1863. Reserve Brigade, Gurney's 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Wistar's Brigade, Yorktown, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to October, 1863. New Berne, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1865. Sub-District of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of North Carolina, to July, 1865.

SERVICE--Regiment reorganized as Infantry August 21, 1861. Duty at Fortress Monroe, Va., until May, 1862. Designated 99th New York Infantry January, 1862. Fletcher's Wharf, Pocomoco, July 30, 1861. Cherrystone Inlet July 31. Company "B" detached on Steamers "Southfield" and "Hunchback" with Burnside's Expedition to Roanoke Island, N. C., January 7-February 8, 1862. Battle of Roanoke Island February 8. Battle of New Berne, N. C., March 14. Siege of Fort Macon April 12-26. Regiment--Bombardment and capture of Forts Hatteras and Clarke August 28-29, 1861. Beacon Island September 16. Newport News, Va., and destruction of "Congress" and "Cumberland" in Hampton Roads March 8-9, 1862. Tranter's Creek and occupation of Norfolk and Portsmouth May 10. At Camp Hamilton, Va., May to August, 1862. Expedition from Fortress Monroe June 28-July 4 (Detachment). Near Windsor Shade June 30. James River July 4. Duty by detachments at Fortress Monroe, Norfolk, Fort Wood and Sewell's Point August to October, 1862. Company "I" detached on Gunboats "West End" and "Smith Briggs" August, 1862, to March, 1863. Duty at Norfolk and Suffolk, Va., until May, 1863. Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. South Quay Road April 17. Suffolk April 28-30. South Quay Bridge May 1. Providence Church Road, Suffolk, May 3. Operations on Norfolk & Petersburg Railroad May 15-28. Near Providence Church May 17. Antioch Church and Paker's Cross Roads May 23. Walkerton June 5. Blackwater June 16. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Expedition from White House to South Anna River July 1-7. South Anna Bridge July 4. Duty at White House, Yorktown and Gloucester until October, 1863. Expedition from Norfolk to Isle of Wight County January 29-February 1, 1864 (Detachment). Smithfield, N. C., January 31 and February 1 (Detachment). Duty in the Defenses of New Berne, N. C., October, 1863, to July, 1865. Operations about New Berne against Whiting January 18-February 10. Actions at New Berne February 1-4, 1864. Batchelor's Creek February 1. Beech Grove February 2. Old members mustered out June 14, 1864. Regiment consolidated to 4 Companies and again to 3 Companies September 15, 1864, and to 2 Companies February, 1865. Mustered out at Salisbury, N. C., July 15, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 37 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 161 Enlisted men by disease. Total 203.

100th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

100th New York, "History of the One Hundredth New York Volunteers," by George Stowits. Originally published in 1870, this is a small book about a regiment from Buffalo, New York. This is a difficult book to find. If found, expect to pay upwards of 300 dollars. [Again, my thanks to Mike, aka, Woodynails@aol.com ] (my special New York Correspondant!)

100th New York, "One Battle Too Many," by Richard P. Galloway. This book is a chronicle of the original letters and diary of Simon Bolivar Hulbert, Private, 100th New York Volunteers. Hulbert served 33 months with the Buffalo, NY based regiment and saw action in the Peninsula Campaign, the Battle at Fair Oaks, the siege of Morris Island, the Evacuation of Fort Wagner, and the Battle of Drewry's Bluff. Hulbert was imprisoned at Salisbury, Belle Island, and finally at Andersonville, Georgia where he succumbed to wounds and disease. Farewell to a brave lad, Richard. 348 pages, roster, cost $ 30.00. (if you can find a copy).

101st New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: Organized at Hancock, N.Y., September 2, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., March 9, 1862. Attached to Wadsworth's Command, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. Whipple's Brigade, defenses of Washington, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to December, 1862.

SERVICE--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until June, 1862. Ordered to Join Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula June, 1862. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove June 25; Jordan's Ford June 27; White Oak Swamp Bridge and Glendale June 30; Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 16-26. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30; Chanuntily September 1. Guard fords of the Monocacy until October 11. Movement up the Potomac and to Falmouth, Va., October 11-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Transferred to 37th New York Infantry December 24, 1862.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 24 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 48 Enlisted men by disease. Total 74.

101st Regiment New York Volunteers, "The History of the One Hundred First New York Volunteer Infantry," by Henry E. Ford. This is a small book with very little information. Nevins says it is little more than a newspaper article. There are some very brief biographies taking up maybe half of the book. It is extremely rare and is over 300 dollars if found. Thanks to Mike Nicosia for forwarding this info. to me.

102nd REGIMENT INFANTRY ("VAN BUREN LIGHT INFANTRY") Organized at New York City. Left State for Washington, D. C, March 10, 1862. Attached to Wadsworth's Command, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. Cooper's 1st Brigade, Sigel's Division, Dept. of the Shenandoah, to June, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to August, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army Potomac, to October, 1863, and Army of the Cumberland to April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, Bartlett's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to July, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until May, 1862. Moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., May. Defense of Harper's Ferry against Jackson's attack May 28-30. Operations in the Shenandoah Valley until August. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Guard trains during the campaign. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty at Bolivar Heights until December. Reconnoissance to Rippon, W. Va., November 9. Expedition to Winchester December 2-6. March to Fredericksburg, Va., December 9-16. At Fairfax Station until January 20, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Regiment detached in New York on special duty March 10-April 4. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until September. Movement to Bridgeport, Ala., September 24-October 3. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Guarding railroad until November. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Battles of Lookout Mountain November 23-24; Mission Ridge November 25; Ringgold Gap, Taylor's Ridge, November 27. Duty in Lookout Valley ununtil May, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Near Cassville May 19. Advance on Dallas May 22-25. New Hope Church May 25. Battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 26-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Gilgal or Golgotha Church June 15. Muddy Creek June 17. Noyes Creek June 19. Kolb's Farm June 22. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Operations at Chattahoochie River Bridge August 26-September 2. Occupation of Atlanta September 2-November 15. Expedition from Atlanta to Tuckum's Cross Roads October 26-29. Near Atlanta November 9. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Near Davidsboro November 28. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 9-13. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Duty at Washington, D.C., until July. Mustered out July 21, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 66 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 82 Enlisted men by disease. Total 155.

104th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: ("WADSWORTH GUARDS," "LIVINGSTON COUNTY REGIMENT"). Organized at Geneseo, N.Y., October, 1861, to March, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., March 22, 1862. Attached to Wadsworth's Command, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to June, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to August, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to September, 1864. Provost Guard, 5th Army Corps, to May, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until May, 1862. Expedition to Front Royal, Va., to intercept Jackson, May 28-June 1. Picket duty on the Shenandoah and at Front Royal until June 10. Duty at Catlett's Station, Warrenton and Waterloo, Va., until August. Battle of Cedar Creek August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 21-23. Thoroughfare Gap August 28. Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Chanuntily September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. Duty near Sharpsburg until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth and Belle Plains until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Fitzhugh's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Chancellorsville May 2-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock and Rapidan until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Laurel Hill May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Ford May 23. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. White Oak Swamp June 13. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864 (Reserve). Weldon Railroad August 18-21. Reconnoissance toward Dinwiddie Court House September 15. Warren's Raid on Weldon Railroad December 7-12. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Lewis Farm, near Gravelly Run, March 29. White Oak Road March 31. Five Forks April 1. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 1-12. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington until July. Mustered out July 17, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 81 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 145 Enlisted men by disease. Total 233.

104th New York, "The Civil War Letters of Private Charles Barber," by Raymond Barber and Gary E. Swinson. History of the 104th New York Volunteers highlights 135 letters written home by a soldier in Company A. 256 pages, photos, index, cost $ 17.50.

106th New York, aka "the Second Saint Lawrence Regiment"....fact.... "This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

107th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

108th New York, "A Complete History and Record of the One Hundred and Eighth Regiment New York Volunteers from 1862 to 1894," by George H. Washburn. Originally published in 1894 at Rochester, NY, this book may prove hard to find. Reprint with illustrations and 521 pages, costs $ 57.50.

109th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

109th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

110th New York Infantry Regiment: Organized at Oswego, N.Y., and mustered in August 27, 1862. Left State for Baltimore, Md., August 29, 1862. Attached to the Defenses of Baltimore, Md., 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to October, 1862. Emery's Brigade, 8th Army Corps, to November, 1862. Emery's Brigade, Louisiana Expedition, to December, 1862. Sherman's Division, Dept. of the Gulf, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to February, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 19th Army Corps, to February, 1864. Key West, Fla., District of West Florida, Dept. Gulf, to August, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Baltimore, Md., until November 6, 1862. Moved to Fortress Monroe, Va., November 6, then sailed for New Orleans, La., December 4, arriving at Carrollton December 26, and duty there until March, 1863. Operations on Bayou Plaquemine February 12-28. Moved to Baton Rouge, La., March 7. Operations against Port Hudson, La., March 7-27. Moved to Algiers April 3, then to Brashear City April 8. Expedition to Franklin April 11-17. Fort Bisland April 12-13. Franklin April 14. Expedition from Opelousas to Barre Landing April 21. Expedition from Barre Landing to Berwick City May 21-26. Franklin and Centreville May 25. Moved to Port Hudson, La., May 30. Siege of Port Hudson June 3-July 9. Assault on Port Hudson June 14. Surrender of Port Hudson July 9. Duty at Baton Rouge, Donaldsonville, Brashear City and Berwick until October. Western Louisiana (Teche) Campaign October 3-November 30. Vermillionville November 11. Duty at New Iberia until January 7, 1864. Moved to Franklin January 7, then to Key West, Fla., February, 1864, and garrison duty at Fort Jefferson until August, 1865. Attack on Fort Myers, Fla., February 20, 1865 (Detachment). Mustered out August 28, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 14 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 191 Enlisted men by disease. Total 210.

111th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

"111th New York", by Arabella Wilson. See Info. under the 126th New York.

111th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

112th New York, aka "the Chautauqua Regiment"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

112th New York, "History of the One Hundred and Twelfth Regiment New York Volunteers," by Chaplain William L. Hyde of the 112th New York. Originally published in 1866, by McKinstry Publishing, Fredonia, New York, this book may be hard to find, but if located will cost around $ 200.00. 214 pages, with portraits, reprint costs $ 30.00.

112th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

114th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

114th New York, "Record of the One Hundred Fourteenth New York State Volunteers, Where It Went, What is Saw and What it Did, by Harris H. Beecher, Assistant Surgeon, 114th NYSV. Originally published in 1866, at Norwich, New York, the 114th went to Mississippi and then to Louisiana, fighting at Port Hudson, Sabine Pass, the Red River Campaign, on to Virginia and the Shenandoah Valley Campaign including the Battles at Winchester, Cedar Creek, and Fisher's Hill. Reprint consisting of 582 pages, with portraits, costs around $ 49.00.

114th New York, "History of the One Hundred and Fourteenth Regiment New York State Volunteers," by Ellias P. Pellet. Originally published in 1866, at Norwich, New York. Reprint, 406 pages, costs $ 37.50.

115th New York, aka "the Iron Hearts"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

115th New York, "The Iron Hearted Regiment: Being an Account of the Battles, Marches, and Gallant Deeds Performed by the One Hundred and Fifteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers," by James H. Clark. Originally published in 1865 by J. Munsell, at Albany, New York, this book may prove hard to locate. 337 page reprint costs $ 37.50.

115th New York, "The One Hundred and Fifteenth New York in the Civil War: A Regimental History," by Mark Silo. Originally published in 2008 by McFarland Publishing, PO Box 611, Jefferson, NC 28640. The book is illustrated with maps, endnotes, bibliography and index, is 306 pages and costs $ 55 plus shipping.

116th New York, "History of the One Hundred Sixteenth Regiment of New York Volunteers," by Orton S. Clark. Originally published in 1868 at Buffalo, New York, this book may prove hard to locate. 384 page reprint with portrait costs
$ 35.00.

117th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

117th New York, "Back Home in Oneida: Hermon Clarke of the One Hundred Seventeenth New York Infantry Volunteer Regiment and his Letters," by Jackson and O'Donnell. 1965 issue 212 pages, cost $ 15.00.

117th New York, "A History of the One Hundred Seventeenth Regiment New York Volunteers (4th Oneida)," by James A. Mowris, MD; with a foreword by Edward Bearss. This unit was formed at Utica, New York, in 1862 and served until June, 1865, fighting at Petersburg, Fort Fisher, Fort Gilmer, and the Campaigns in North Carolina. Includes an appendix detailing prison life at Andersonville, GA. An early reviewer wrote, "Straightforward, fresh recollections of a soldier whose service was primarily along the Atlantic seacoast." Published by Edmonston Publishing, Inc., Hamilton, New York, circa 1997, costs $ 29.00.

117th New York, "Back Home in Oneida: Hermon Clarke and His Letters," by Hermon Clarke of the 117th New York. Edited by Harry Jackson and Tom O'Donnell. Clarke served with the 117th New York for 34 months and wrote 72 letters in which he reported his experiences of the war and battle fighting with the 117th at Bermuda Hundred, Drewry's Bluff, Petersburg, Fort Fisher, Charleston and Wilmington. Originally published in 1965 by the Syracuse University Press, 212 pages with maps and photos, costs $ 25.00.

118th New York, "Three Years with the Adirondack Regiment, One Hundred and Eighteenth New York Volunteers Infantry: From the Diaries and Other Memoranda of John L. Cunningham," by John L. Cunningham, Major of the 118th New York Volunteers, as well as Brevet Lieutenant Colonel U.S. Volunteers. Originally published for Private Circulation in 1920 at Glen Falls, New York, indeed, this title may prove very difficult to locate for your private collection.

119th New York Regiment of Volunteer Infantry: Organized at New York City and mustered in September 4, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., September 6, 1862. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1863, and Army of the Cumberland to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

SERVICE---Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until November, 1862. Movement to Gainesville, Va., November 1-9, then to Centreville November 18, and to Falmouth December 9-16. At Stafford Court House until January 20, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. At Stafford Court House until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Guard duty on Orange & Alexandria Railroad until September. Movement to Bridgeport, Ala., September 24-October 3. Duty there and in Lookout Valley until November 22. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battle of Wauhatchie, Tenn., October 28-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Orchard Knob November 23. Tunnel Hill November 24-25. Mission Ridge November 25. March to relief of Knoxville November 28-December 17. Duty in Alabama until April, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Operations against Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. Mill Creek or Dug Gap May 8. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Near Cassville May 19. New Hope Church May 25. Battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 26-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Gilgal or Golgotha Church June 15. Muddy Creek June 17. Noyes Creek June 19. Kolk's Farm June 22. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Operations at Chattahoochie River Bridge August 26-September 2. Occupation of Atlanta September 2 to November 15. Expedition from Atlanta to Tuckum's Cross Roads October 26-29. Near Atlanta November 9. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Between Eden and Pooler's Stations December 9. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 9-13. Smithfield, N. C., April 11. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 30-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out June 7, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 102nd New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 66 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 92 Enlisted men by disease. Total 166.

120th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

120th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment: ("aka Ulster Regiment or Washington Guard.") Organized at Kingston, N.Y., and mustered in August 22, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 24, 1862. Attached to Whipple's Brigade, defenses of Washington, D.C., to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to December, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D. C., until November, 1862. At Fairfax Station, Va., until November 25. Operations on Orange & Alexandria Railroad November 10-12. Rappahannock Campaign December, 1862, to June, 1863. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15, 1862. At Falmouth, Va., until April, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Operations at Rappahannock Bridge and Grove Church February 5-7. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Wapping Heights July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock and Rapidan until October. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 8-22. James City October 8, 9 and 10. Russell's Ford, Robertson's River, and Bethesda Church October 10. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly's Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne's Farm November 27. Mine Run November 28-30. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Laurel Hill May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or "Bloody Angle" May 12. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Front of Forts Hascall and Morton November 5. Reconnoissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton and White Oak Roads March 29-31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge, Farmville, April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville until May 2. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 3, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 73rd New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 11 Officers and 140 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 179 Enlisted men by disease. Total 333.

120th New York, "The One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment New York State Volunteers," by Charles Van Santwood. Originally published in 1894 at Roundout, New York, this book may prove hard to find.

121st New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

121st REGIMENT INFANTRY.--("ORANGE AND HERKIMER REGIMENT.") Organized at Herkimer and mustered in August 13, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., September 2, 1862. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac and Army of the Shenandoah, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Maryland Campaign September 6-22, 1862. Duty at Sharpsburg, Md., until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth until April, 1863. "Mud March," January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 14-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock and Rapidan until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15, 1864. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient, "Bloody Angle," May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 17-18. Siege of Petersburg to July 9. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23. Moved to Washington, D.C., July 9-11. Repulse of Early's attack on Fort Stevens and the Northern Defences of Washington July 11-12. Expedition to Snicker's Gap July 14-23. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Near Charleston August 21-22. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Mt. Jackson September 23-24. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Petersburg, Va., December 9-12. Siege of Petersburg December 12, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Farmville and Burkesville until April 23. March to Danville April 23-27 and duty there until May 24. March to Richmond, then to Washington, D.C., May 24-June 3. Corps Review June 8. Mustered out June 25, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 65th New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 14 Officers and 212 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 117 Enlisted men by disease. Total 347.

121st New York, "Report of the Gettysburg Monument Commission of the One Hundred and Twenty-first New York Volunteers," by Lieutenant Colonel J.W. Cronkite. Originally published in 1889, at Cooperstown, New York, this extremely rare regimental history, which includes unit photos as well as General Upton, if located, could cost around $ 600.00.

121st New York, "History of the One Hundred and Twenty-first New York Volunteer Regiment," by Isaac O. Best. Reprint edition of one of the rarest of all regimental histories. This unit served in the Sixth U.S. Army Corps from Antietam to Appomattox and ranked very high in terms of killed and wounded. During the Civil War, the 121st New York Regiment captured seven Confederate colors and took more prisoners than its own total combined enrollment. This new reprint edition contains an introduction by Joseph S. Covais, which covers material not discussed by the author, including data on uniforms and Upton's role in molding the regiment. Organized at Herkimer, NY, from companies raised in the 20 Senatorial District--Otsego and Herkimer Counties. It was mustered into service on August 23, 1862, and the next week started for the scene of active operations, it was immediately ordered to join General George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac, then in Maryland, and it did so in time to witness the fighting at Crampton's Gap. It was assigned to Bartlett's Brigade, Brook's Division, 6th US Army Corps, in which command (2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th US Army Corps) it served the entire service. The regiment faced a terrible fire at Salem Church, VA, where it lost 48 killed, 173 wounded, and 55 missing; total, 276, out of 453 officially reported as present. The missing ones were mostly all killed or wounded, and the loss was the heaviest sustained by any regiment in that battle. Colonel Upton was an officer of rare ability, and the regiment, which was comprised of unusually good material, soon became, under Upton's care, a very efficient one. In the battle of Spotsylvania, May 10th, Colonel Upton commanded, and led in person, an assaulting column of 12 picked regiments belonging to the 6th Corps, the 121st being placed in advance, an honor which cost it dearly. Its losses at Spotsylvania amounted to 49 killed and 106 wounded; none missing. The regiment captured four flags at Rappahannock Station, and two at Sailor's Creek. Its casualties at the Wilderness were 15 killed, 37 wounded, and 21 missing; and at Cedar Creek, 10 killed, 42 wounded, and 5 missing. General Wright commanded the division at the Wilderness; General Russell at the Opequon; and General Wheaton at Cedar Creek. Originally published in 1921, this 1996 reprint, 288 pages, photos, roster, cost $ 35.00.

121st New York, "A Surgeon's Civil War: The Letters and Diary of Daniel M. Holt, M.D.," edited by James M. Greiner, Janet L. Coryell, and James R. Smither. Daniel M. Holt was the assistant surgeon of the 121st New York, joined the service in the summer of 1862 and witnessed the war with the Army of the Potomac until he retired on account of poor health in the fall of 1864. From his unusual vantage point, Holt wrote his wife about his experiences as a medical officer, both on the battlefield and in camp.....Holt's letters survived through his own forethought. As he was dying of tuberculosis contracted in the army, Dr. Holt copied all of his letters and diary entries so that his children could read them and learn of their father's wartime service. Holt's daughter, in turn, donated the transcribed material to a New York historical society in 1930, where they remained until James M. Greiner, one of the editors, uncovered them. In a successful collaboration, Greiner and two other editors, Coryell and Smither, have brought Dr. Holt's war to late 20th century readers. The editors have crafted a fine account with chapters, introductions, footnotes, maps, and photograph while fully retaining the flavor of Dr. Holt's original composition. No doubt, the good doctor himself would be pleased to know that his intent has been faithfully executed 130 years later. (reviewed by Kevin Conley Ruffner, Washington, DC, for "Civil War" magazine). 1994 release, 289 pages, photos, cost $ 28.00.

122nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment.--("ONONDAGAS.") Organized at Syracuse, N. Y, and mustered in August 28, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 31, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to January, 1864. Johnson's Island, Ohio, to March, 1864. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, to July, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac and Army of the Shenandoah, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.--Maryland Campaign September 6-22, 1862. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 20. Moved to Stafford Court House, Va., October 20-November 18, and to Belle Plains December 5. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth, Va., until April, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock and Rapidan until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty at and near Brandy Station until January, 1864. On detached duty at Johnson's Island, Lake Erie, until March. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient, "Bloody Angle," May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 17-18. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23. Siege of Petersburg until July 9. Moved to Washington, D. C, July 9-11. Repulse of Early's attack on Fort Stevens and the Northern defenses of Washington July 11-12. Expedition to Snicker's Gap, Va., July 14-23. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Gilbert's Ford, Opequon Creek, September 13. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Petersburg, Va., December 9-12. Siege of Petersburg December 12, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Fort Fisher, Petersburg, March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Farmville and Burkesville until April 23. March to Danville, Va., April 23-27, and duty there until May 24. March to Richmond, then to Washington, D.C., May 24-June 3. Corps Review June 8. Mustered out June 28, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 85 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 85 Enlisted men by disease. Total 179.

122nd New York, "Ruggles' Regiment - History of the 122nd New York Volunteers in the American Civil War," by David B. Swinfen. Published by the University of New England, Hanover in 1982, this first edition with regimental roster, costs $ 65.00.

123rd New York, "Reminiscences of the 123rd Regiment New York State Volunteers: Giving a Complete History of its Three Years Service in the War," by Sergeant Henry C. Morhous. Introduction by Michael Russert. 220 page 1995 reprint costs about $ 30.00. As a sidenote, the author, Henry Morhous enlisted in the "Whitehall Company" on June 28, 1862, and served in the 123rd New York Regiment, also known as the Washington County Regiment from its beginning until the regiment was discharged forever from active service on June 8, 1865. Morhous, as a private, and later on as a sergeant, experienced the storms at Gettysburg, & Chancellorsville, as well as western KP duty at such places as along the Tennessee River, the Atlanta Campaign, including Union Lieut. General William Tecumseh Sherman's "March to the Sea",
Available at the Washington County Historical Society, 167 Broadway, Ft. Edward, NY 12828, 518-747-9108.

123rd New York, "The Civil War Diary of Rice C. Bull, One Hundred Twenty Third New York Volunteer Infantry," by Rice C. Bull. Edited by K. Jack Bauer. Originally released in 1977 by Presidio Press, 1114 Irwin St., San Rafael, CA 94901, this book is 259 pages and is available in both soft and hardbound; doesn't have a roster but does have bibliography.

123rd New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

124th New York, aka "the Orange Blossoms"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

124th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry ("AMERICAN GUARD," "ORANGE BLOSSOMS"). Organized at Goshen and mustered in September 5, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., September 6. Attached to Piatt's Brigade, Whipple's Division, 3rd Army Corps, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE:--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until October, 1862. Moved to Point of Rocks, then to Pleasant Valley, Md., October 18-19. Movement toward Warrenton, Va., October 24-November 16. Reconnoissance to Manassas Gap November 5-6. Movement to Falmouth, Va., November 18-24. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Duty near Falmouth until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Beverly Ford and Brandy Station June 9. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock and the Rapidan until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly's Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne's Farm November 27. Mine Run November 28-30. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Laurel Hill May 8. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Pc River May 10. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient "Bloody Angle" May 12. Harris Farm, or Fredericksburg Road, May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration on north side of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Raid on Weldon Railroad December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton and White Oak Roads March 29-31. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville until May 2. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 3, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 93rd New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 11 Officers and 137 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 92 Enlisted men by disease. Total 241.

124th New York, "History of the One Hundred Twenty-fourth Regiment of New York State Volunteers," by Charles H. Weygant. Originally published in 1877 at Newburgh, New York. This famous regiment, known as the "Orange Blossoms," fought in all the major campaigns of the Union Army of the Potomac. At Gettysburg, this regiment formed part of Ward's Brigade, Birney's Division, Sickles' U.S. 3rd Army Corps. The 124th New York fought gallantly at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, at Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, and finally, at Appomattox Court-House, Va. An original may prove difficult to locate, and may cost around $ 450. A recent reprint of 460 pages, cost around $ 45.00.

125th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

125th New York Volunteer Regiment Infantry: Organized at Troy, N.Y., and mustered in August 29, 1862. Left State for Baltimore, Md., August 31; then moved to Martinsburg, Va., September 2, 1862. Retreat to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 11-12. Attached to Miles' Command, Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September, 1862. Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Casey's Division, Defenses of Washington, D.C., to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Abercrombie's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to June, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd, Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1864. Consolidated Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to November, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE:--Defense of Harper's Ferry, West Va., September 12-15, 1862. Maryland Heights September 12-13. Bolivar Heights September 14-15. Surrendered September 15. Paroled September 16 and sent to Annapolis, Md., then to Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., and duty there guarding prisoners until November, 1862. Declared exchanged November 22, 1862. Moved to Washington, D.C., November 23-25. Camp at Arlington Heights, Va., until December 3, and at Centreville, Va., until June, 1863. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field and Joined 2nd Army Corps June 25, 1863. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 25-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Duty on lines of the Rappahannock.and Rapidan until October. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Auburn and Bristoe October 14. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Po River May 10. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient "Bloody Angle" May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration on north side of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration north side of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Reconnoissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. On line of Hatcher's and Gravelly Runs March 29-30. White Oak Road March 31. Sutherland Station and fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out at Alexandria, Va.. June 5, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 4th New York Heavy Artillery.

Regiment lost during service 15 Officers and 112 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 112 Enlisted men by disease. Total 240.

125th New York, "A Regimental History of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New York Volunteers," by Ezra D. Simons. Originally published in 1888, at New York, New York, this book may prove hard to find. 381 pages, with illustrations and maps, a reprint costs $ 42.00.

"125th New York," by Arabella Wilson. See Info. under the 126th New York.

126th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

126th New York, "The Redemption of the "Harper's Ferry Cowards." The Story of the 111th and the 126th New York State Volunteer Regiments at Gettysburg," by R. L. Murray, 175 pages with maps, this paperback costs about $ 15.00.

126th New York, "Disaster, Struggle, Triumph: 1,000 Boys in Blue: The One Hundred Twenty Sixth Regiment of New York State Volunteers," by Arabella M. Wilson. Originally published in 1870 at Albany, New York, this 593 page 1990 reprint includes biographical sketches of members of the 39th, 111th and 125th New York Regiments. Cost, $ 55.00

126th New York, "Written in Blood: A History of the One Hundred Twenty Sixth New York Infantry in the Civil War," by Wayne Mahood. An all-new annotated history, with roster of the men raised in 1862 from the counties of Ontario, Yates, and Seneca. Great content on Gettysburg and the 1864 Virginia Campaigns. 548 pages, 20 maps, 63 illustrations including portraits of 23 unit members. Available circa June 30, 1997 for $ 40.00 from the Longstreet House, P.O. Box 730, Highstown, NJ 08520.

127th New York, "The History of the One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh New York Volunteers, aka the "Monitors," by Franklin McGrath, Company A, 127th NY V.I. (Originally published?) Thanks to Paul Fisher at pfisher@unix.asb.com for supplying me with this info. on this valiant group of young men.

128th New York, "History of the One Hundred Twenty-Eighth New York Volunteer Infantry, August, 1862-July, 1865," by David H. Hanaburgh (8th Corporal, of Company C). Originally published in 1894 by the Enterprise Publishing Company, Poughkeepsie, New York, this book may prove hard to find. Thanks to Dean Thomas for submitting this info. to us, who also has a website on the 128th listed below. 280 pages, with portraits and folding view, reprint costs $ 37.50.

128th New York, "Diary of an Enlisted Man, of the One Hundred Twenty-Eighth New York Volunteer Infantry," by Lawrence Van Alstyne (Private Company B, subsequently transferred to the Corp de' Afrique). Originally published in 1910 by the Tuttle, Morehouse and Taylor Company, New Haven, Connecticut, this book may prove hard to find. Thanks to Dean Thomas for submitting this info. to us, who also has a website on the 128th listed below.

128th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

The diary of my great-great-grandfather, Joseph W. Crowther, Cpl., Co. H., 128th NY Website

131st New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website. - (1-15-04) Greetings: After an absence of over 2 years from the worldwide web, the 131st New York Volunteer Infantry website is once again up and running and hoping that you will be most cordial as you had once done in the past to link this Civil War website on the history of the 131st NYSV to your most prestigious website. Thank fellow Civil War Enthusiasts, Richard Ether

132nd REGIMENT INFANTRY:--("2nd REGIMENT EMPIRE BRIGADE.") Organized at New York City and mustered in at Washington, D.C., October 4, 1862. Left State for Washington September 27, 1862. Attached to Spinola's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, 18th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Unattached, defenses of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1864. Palmer's Brigade, Peck's Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to April, 1864. Sub-District New Berne, N. C., District of North Carolina, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, District of Beaufort, N. C., Dept. of North Carolina, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, Division District of Beaufort, N. C., Dept. of North Carolina, to April, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to June, 1865.

SERVICE:--Moved from Washington, D.C., to Norfolk; then to Suffolk, Va., October, 1862, and duty there until December, 1862. Ordered to New Berne, N. C., December 17, and duty there until March, 1865. Expedition from New Berne to Trenton, Pollocksville, Young's Cross Roads and Swansborough March 6-10, 1863. Expedition from New Berne for relief of Little Washingten April 7-10. Expedition from New Berne toward Kinston April 16-21. Operations about New Berne against Whiting January 18-February 10, 1864. Newberne February 1-4, 1864. Batchelor's Creek February 1. Beech Grove February 1-3. Batchelor's Creek May 26. Scout to Dover and Core Creek June 17-18. Expedition toward Kinston June 20-23. Jackson's Mills, Southwest Creek, June 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26, 1865. Southwest Creek March 7. Battle of Wise's Forks March 8-10. Kinston March 14. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 9-13. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Salsbury, N. C., until June. Mustered out June 29, 1865. Recruits transferred to 99th New York Infantry. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 13 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 159 Enlisted men by disease. Total 174.

133rd Regiment of New York Volunteer Infantry: --("2nd REGIMENT METROPOLITAN GUARD.") Organized at New York City and mustered in September 24, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., October 8, 1862. Attached to Abercrombie's Division, defenses of Washington, D.C., to November, 1862. Grover's Brigade, Banks' New Orleans Expedition, to December, 1862. Grover's Division, Dept. of the Gulf, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to October, 1863. defenses of New Orleans, La., to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 19th Army Corps, to June, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to July, 1864, and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to February, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 1st Provisional Division, Army of the Shenandoah, to April, 1865. 3rd Brigade, Dwight's Division, defenses of Washington, D. C, 22nd Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the defenses of Washington, D. C., until November, 1862. Moved to New Orleans, La., November, 1862. Occupation of Baton Rouge, La., December 17, and duty there until March, 1863. Operations on Bayou Plaquemine February 12-28. Operations against Port Hudson, La., March 7-27. Moved to Algiers April 3, then to Brashear City April 8. Operations in Western Louisiana April 9-May 14. Teche Campaign April 11-20. Fort Bisland, near Centreville, April 12-13. Pursuit to Opelousas April 15-20. Expedition from Opelousas to Chicotsville and Bayou Boeuf April 26-29. Expedition to Alexandria May 4-12. March to Port Hudson May 19-26. Siege of Port Hudson May 26-July 9. Expedition to Niblitt's Bluff May 26-29. Assault on Port Hudson June 14. Surrender of Port Hudson July 9. Moved to New Orleans July 15 and duty there until August 28. Sabine Pass Expedition September 4-12. Moved to Brashear City September 16, then to Berwick City. Western Louisiana "Teche" Campaign October 3-November 30. Duty in the defenses of New Orleans until April, 1864. Red River Campaign April 26-May 22. Construction of dam at Alexandria April 30- May 10. Retreat to Mansura May 13-20. Mansura May 16. At Morganza until July 2. Moved to New Orleans, La., then to Fortress Monroe and Deep Bottom, Va., July 2-18. Moved to Washington, D.C., July 31. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Detached from army August 14, and duty as Train Guard for Sheridan's army until October 27. Duty at Middletown, Newtown, Stephenson's Depot and Winchester and in the Shenandoah Valley until April, 1865. Moved to Washington, D.C., April 20, and duty there until June. Grand Review May 23-24. Recruits transferred to 90th New York Infantry May 31. Regiment mustered out June 6, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 41 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 78 Enlisted men by disease. Total 122.

134th New York, "A History of the One Hundred Thirty-Fourth New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment," by Charles Cosgrove. "This books is number sixteen in a series named 'Studies in American history'. Mike Nicosia got this book from Amazon and paid $119.00 for it. It's a first edition from 1997. The book is 450 pages long and goes into detail about every soldier who served in the regiment. It's an excellant book...but a bit over-priced." Again thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for his special expertise in New York Regimentals and forwarding this info. to me.

134th New York, "Never Forsake the Flag: The Letters of Captain George A. Turnbull, Company "A" of the One Hundred Thirty-Fourth New York Volunteers," compiled by Kenneth M. Jones. The letters included in this publication were stored away in a safe in a barn in Duanesburg, New York, belonging to Judge James Wemple Liddle. Located on Route 7 west of the four corners, the barn was removed around the time I-88 was constructed. Judge Liddle had married Isabell Turnbull, who probably inherited the property. The men serving with this regiment were from rural as well as industrial towns. In addition to George's letters, are letters, diaries, excerpts from rare books and papers from other local people who were living during the time. "For those of us who have a strong interest in the Civil War, we are blessed with the fact that there are countless "diaries" kept by participants in our country's epic struggle. Perhaps they were astute enough to realize they were making history as they plodded along in the ranks of the blue and grey. Mothers and other relatives back home also contributed by stashing away all those letters they received from their loved ones marching and fighting on our nation's battlefields. That generation's legacy, in part, "willed" these to all future generations to enjoy. Since the end of hostilities to the present, literally thousands of these diaries have been published in book form. This recently published book (1998) contains the letters of Captain George A. Turnbull of the 134th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The book is being sold as a fund raiser for the Esperance Historical Museum. "Never Forsake the Flag" tells the story of one member of the 134th and the comments of many other soldiers, newspaper reporters, children, etc. This book should appeal to those who are interested in a history of this particular family and/or specific area of New York State, as well as those of us who simply enjoy reading actual Civil war vintage letters. Hats off to Ken Jones for his unselfishness in his fund raiser for the Esperance Historical Museum! Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website. The book contains 120 pages and approximately 30 photos, and can be purchased for $10.00, postage paid by mailing a check to the Esperance Historical Society, Box 99, Esperance, NY 12066. You can also contact the author, Ken Jones directly by e-mailing him at jonesk@crisny.org

"Under the Crescent and Star by George W. Conklin - A history of 134th New York Volunteers," - Dustjacket, 369 pages with a full roster. Impressive book on this rural upstate 11th corps. unit that saw heavy fighting at Gettysburg and out west. The book is filled with diary excepts and photos of soldiers and maps to make the text easier to understand. Available at most Civil war book stores at a cost of 30.00 dollars. Desolating This Fair Country - The Civil War Diary and Letters of Lt. Henry C. Lyon, 34th New York Infantry, Edited by Emily N. Radigan, NO dustjacket as issued! 209 Pages. 1999. The letters of Henry C. Lyon, an upstate New Yorker, that was killed at Antietam in 1862. He was well educated and wrote like a scholar. This book offers interesting insight on politics as he was a staunch Republican. Costs around 25.00 dollars. Thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for forwarding this info. to me.

134th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

136th New York, (Iron Clads," Organized at Portage, N.Y., and mustered in September 25, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., October 3, 1862. Attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1863, and Army of the Cumberland to April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.--Moved to Fairfax Station, Va., October 10, 1862; then to Fairfax Court House, and duty there until November 1. Movement to Warrenton, then to Germantown, Va., November 1-20. March to Fredericksburg December 10-15. At Falmouth, Va., until April 27, 1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Camp at Bristoe Station August 1 to September 24. Movement to Bridgeport, Ala., September 24-October 3. March along line of Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad to Lookout Valley, Tenn., October 25-28. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battle of Wauhatchie, Tenn., October 28-29. Ringgold-Chattanooga Campaign November 23-27. Orchard Knob November 23. Tunnel Hill November 24-25. Mission Ridge November 25. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 17. Duty in Lookout Valley until May, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstration on Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. Buzzard's Roost Gap May 8-9. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Near Cassville May 19. Advance on Dallas May 22-25. New Hope Church May 25. Battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 26-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Gilgal or Golgotha Church June 15. Muddy Creek June 17. Noyes' Creek June 19. Kolb's Farm June 22. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Peach Tree Creek July 11-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Operations at Chattahoochie River Bridge August 26-September 2. Occupation of Atlanta September 2-November 15. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Lawtonville, S.C., February 2. Skirmish of Goldsboro Road, near Fayetteville, N. C., March 14. Averysboro March 16. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 9-13. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 30. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out June 13, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 60th New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 71 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 91 Enlisted men by disease. Total 165.

136th New York, "Diary of the One Hundred Thirty Sixth New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment," by John T. McMahon. Edited by John Michael Priest. Includes maps and detailed footnotes that tell the story of this Regiment and its battles at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Chattanooga and Peach Tree Creek, GA. 1993 issue, 142 pages, cost $ 25.00

136th New York, "Wyoming County New Articles 1862-1865, of the One Hundred Thirty-sixth New York Infantry,", Compiled by B. Conrad Bush with reprint of Diary of A Soldier, Maletiah L. Calkinss, Seergeant, Co. G, 136th New York Volunteer Infantry by Dr. Frank Crocker (1862-1865). This compilation gives the reader an insight into the soldiers letters home and local correspondents comments on the unit activities. The 136th served in Virginia through campaigns of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg and then served in the South through battles of Lookout Mountain, Resaca, Atlanta and march to the sea with Sherman. 135 pages, spiral bound soft cover. Index, spiral bound. Cost $ 20 plus $ 1.50 postage. Contact B. Conrad Bush directly. "Conrad has elected to compile information on this valiant unit and offering his hard work for sale directly to other Civil War buffs...bypassing the traditional publishing outfits. His notebook includes a short capsule history of this unit, followed by an index of newspaper articles gleaned from this period as well as entries in unit members' diaries. As I am sure it will prove of interest to ancestors from this unit, I find it lacking of historical value as the notebook only groups and publishes newspaper article with the compiler failing to add anything to tie these reports together. Entries from diaries are the standard you would find from the typical Civil War diary.... we marched.... we camped..we slept ....it was hot... it was cold... etc. With a detailed index, descendants of this unit may find this helpful.. Others may want to pass on adding this to their Civil War libary." Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website.

136th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

137th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

137th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

139th REGIMENT INFANTRY - Organized at Brooklyn, N.Y., and mustered in September 9, 1862. Left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., September 11, 1862. Attached to Camp Hamilton, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to December, 1862. Busteed's Independent Brigade, Yorktown, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. West's Brigade, 7th Army Corps, to May, 1863. West's Advance Brigade, 4th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Wistar's Brigade, United States forces, Yorktown, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1864. 1st Brigade, United States forces, Yorktown, Va.. to February, 1864. District of the Currituck, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to March, 1864. Heckman's Division, Portsmouth, Va., to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, Army of the James, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 24th Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Camp Hamilton, Va., September 20, 1862, to April, 1863. Action at Whittaker's Mills, Williamsburg and Fort Magruder April 11, 1863. Moved to Yorktown, Va., April, and duty there, at Williamsburg and in the District of the Currituck until April,1864. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7, 1863. Expedition from White House to Bottom's Bridge July 1-7. Baltimore Cross Roads July 2. Crump's Cross Roads, Bottom's Bridge, July 2-3. Expedition from Williamsburg to Charles City Court House December 12-14. Near Chickahominy River December 11. Forge Bridge December 12. Charles City Court House December 13. Scouts from Williamsburg January 19 and 24, 1864. Wistar's Expedition against Richmond February 6-8. Butler's operations on south side of the James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of City Point and Bermuda Hundred May 5. Swift Creek or Arrowfield Church May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-27. Moved to White House, then to Cold Harbor May 28-31. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. In trenches before Petersburg and on the Bermuda Hundred front until September 27; 1864. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Assault and capture of Fort Harrison September 29. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Duty in lines before Richmond until April, 1865. Occupation of Richmond April 3. Provost duty at Richmond and Manchester, Va., until June. Mustered out June 19, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 98th New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 66 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 79 Enlisted men by disease. Total 151.

"The Civil War Letters of Albert and Edward Bayles, and the History of their Regiment, the 139th New York Volunteer Infantry, by Donald M. Bayles. Published by the Longwood Society for Historical Preservation, Middle Island, NY, in 2004. 141 page softback, a copy may be purchased for $ 15 plus $ 3 shipping, from the Society, PO Box 550, Middle Island, NY. Make checks payable to L.S.H.P. "I will begin my book review simply from the letter I received from the publisher. [Thanks for taking the time to review the book which was published by the Longwood Society for Historical Preservation. This regiment, the 139th was one that I researched for our website as these men from our area served in it. There was little or no published work available. It was for this reason that I asked Mr. Bayles to write this history.]

"The Author, Donald Bayles, is the direct descendant of well-known local NY historians. He is the grandnephew of Albert E. and Edward F. Bayles, (band of) brothers of the 139th NY who were both killed at Cold Harbor, Va. (June 2nd, 1864). They are both buried there. There is a monument in their honor in the Union Cemetery, Middle Island, NY. This book includes the 40 letters Mr. Bayles transcibed from his family's heirlooms. In addition, 15 additional letters were discovered for sale on the Internet, purchased by the Society, and included in this book. The book includes illustrations, photos, maps and 3 appendices, information about the 139th Regiment from Phisterer's NY in the War of the Rebellion (1909); the Order of Events of the 139th Regiment from the O/R, as well as a Complete Roster.

Albert E. Bayles was a young and virile 23 years old. He enlisted on 8/15/1862 at Jamaica, NY as a Sergeant. On 9/9/1862 he mustered into "A" Co. NY 139th Infantry and was killed on 6/2/1864 at Cold Harbor, VA. He had the world in front of him to life and enjoy.

Edward F. Bayles, the older brother was 24 years old. He enlisted a mere 12 days later than his younger brother on 8/27/1862 at Brooklyn, NY as a Private. (Perhaps his younger brother's valiance urged him on) On 9/9/1862 he mustered into "A" Co. NY 139th Infantry He, too, was killed on 6/2/1864 at Cold Harbor, VA.

"It's kinda overwhelming for me, the owner of this website, fellow Civil War author, and Civil War book reviewer, to receive in the mail review copies of another author's work to add to my website. Overwhelming in regards to comparing your own work and hard labor to my fellow authors labor and finding the love and inspiration I hold true can be matched (and exceeded in talent) by others. This does not frighten nor intimidate me. Alas, I find this quite refreshing to quietly smile, critique and write a review of their book.

With this said, I can only add that this is a book you must add to your Civil War Collection. It is a tribute to these 2 brothers who valiantly forsaken their future and gave the ultimate price of life we so dearly treasure. If only we could bring this to the masses of the current generation to appreciate how this generation freely donated their lives so we can enjoy our curent status.

As I reviewed this book, I learned how the author's travels to Virignia to find his long lost ancestors whose blood flows freely in his veins. With numerous Civil War photos, etc. including the monument that his grandfather erected in eternal loving homage for his brothers who both died and were statistics on the same day. The same day that Ulysses S. Grant made his infamous decision to charge the middle of the Confederate lines, and cemented the outcome of these poor boys from New York. Where on this day, thousands of Northern Boys would freely give their essence for the cause. In the unmarked graves would be gently laid the fallen bodies of two brothers....

Generations later we now live and quietely state, Absence of Malice.

Let us never forget what they gave.

This author has added a book for us and future generations to enjoy. Reviwed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website.

140th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

140th New York, "Sons of Old Monroe: A Regimental History of Patrick O'Rorke's 140th New York Volunteer Infantry," by Brian B. Bennett. Famous for its fighting at Little Round Top where O'Rorke dismounted and running with sword in hand shouted, "Here they (Confederates) are men. Commence firing!" just before being felled by a Confederate bullet through his neck. Published in 1992 by Morningside Publishing, 649 pages, with rosters, photos, maps, index, costs $ 50.00.

140th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Living History Organization Website.

Colonel Elwell Stephen Otis, Major General-140th New York Volunteer Website.

142nd New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

142nd REGIMENT INFANTRY.--("ST. LAWRENCE COUNTY REGIMENT."): Organized at Ogdensburg, N. Y, and mustered in September 29, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., October 6, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Abercrombie's Division, Defenses of Washington, D. C, to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Abercrombie's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1863. 1st Brigade, Gordon's Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to January, 1864. 1st Brigade, Gordon's Division, Northern District, Dept. of the South, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to May, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, to June, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 24th Army Corps, to January, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Terry's Provisional Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, Dept. of North Carolina, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until April, 1862. Moved to Suffolk, Va., April 19. Siege of Suffolk, Va., April 20-May 4. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. Expedition to Kings and Queens County May 15 (1 Co.). Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Ordered to Washington, D.C., July 10. Pursuit of Lee to Berlin, Md., July 13-22. Moved to Folly Island, S.C., August 1-8. Siege operations against Forts Wagner and Gregg, Morris Island, S.C., and against Fort Sumpter and Charleston, S.C., August 9-September 7. Operations against Charleston and duty at Folly Island, Johns Island and Hilton Head, S.C., until April, 1864. Expedition to Johns and James Islands February 6-14, 1864. Skirmishes at Bugbee's Bridge February 9 and 11. Ordered to Yorktown, Va., April, 1864. Butler's Campaign on south side of the James and operations against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of City Point and Bermuda Hundred May 5. Swift Creek or Arrow field Church May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-28. Moved to White House, then to Cold Harbor May 28-31. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to December 7, 1864. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30. Duty in trenches before Petersburg and on the Bermuda Hundred front until September 27. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Duty in trenches before Richmond until December. Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., December 7-27. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 3-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Cape Fear Intrenchments February 11-13. Fort Anderson February 18-19. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Advance on Raleigh April 9-13. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Raleigh until June. Mustered out June 7, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 169th New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 126 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 161 Enlisted men by disease. Total 292.

143rd New York, "A Condensed History of the One Hundred Forty-Third New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment," by Moses Young. Published in 1909, "This book is mostly a roster of the Sullivan County regiment. This unit saw action in the Atlanta campaign. It was right in the middle of the Peach Tree fight outside of Atlanta, marched to the sea and fought in North Carolina toward the end of the war. The first 50 or so pages deals with the unit history and the rest of the book is a unit roster with a small reunion chapter at the end. This book is difficult to find in good condition. If found expect to pay in the 300 dollar range." Thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for his special expertise in New York Regimentals and forwarding this info. to me. 239 page reprint, with portraits, costs $ 35.00.

143rd New York, "Brass Buttons and Leather Boots - Sullivan County in the Civil War," by the Sullivan County Historical Society. Published in 1963, "This is a small book paying tribute to the people of Sullivan County during the Civil War. The book has a small unit history of the 143rd New York infantry and deals with the Atlanta campaign in some detail. The rest of the book deals with how Sullivan County New York fared during the war. This book isn't terribly hard to find but there were only a limited number of 2,000 published. If found expect to pay at least 50.00 dollars it." Thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for his special expertise in New York Regimentals and forwarding this info. to me.

144th New York, "Back in War Times - History of the One Hundred Forty-forth Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry," by James Harvey McKee. Originally published in 1903, by Lieutenant Horace E. Bailey Publishing, at Unadila, New York. 375 pages, roster, reprint in 1994, by Heritage Books. Cost of $ 30.00. "Most of the 144th came from Delaware County (in New York's arch if you exclude Long Island and see the state as a high-top sneaker), which shares the Delaware River with Pennsylvania as a boundary. The bulk of its service was done in South Carolina, although it spent some time at Suffolk, Virginia and Florida. Names on the 144th's battle flag recalled its combats at Honey Hill, Batteries Wagner & Gregg, Deveaux's Neck, Johns Island, James Island, Coosawhatchie, and the siege of Charleston... Don't pass up this opportunity to obtain a classic regimental at a reasonable price. And write to Heritage Books for their catalog - I guarantee that you'll be pleasantly surprised. Heritage has embarked on a very ambitious course of reprints of Civil War subjects as well as genealogical resources." (partial review by Ben Maryniak for the Civil War Courier). If you are able to track down an original copy from 1903, you may have to pay around $ 475.00. 378 page reprint with illustrations, costs $ 42.50.

144th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

146th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

146th New York, "Campaigns of the One Hundred and Forty-sixth Regiment New York State Volunteers," edited by Mary G.G. Brainard. Originally published in 1915, at New York, New York, this book may prove hard to find, reprint to cost around $ 50 bucks.

146th New York Regiment Re-Enactors' Volunteer Infantry Website - from England

147th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

148th New York, "They Marched on Richmond: The Story of the One Hundred Forty eighth New York Volunteers," by George Shadman, Jr. Originally released in 1996, 291 pages, this book recounts the adventures of the men raised in late 18672 from the 3 Central New York Finger Lakes counties of Ontario, Seneca and Yates, costs $ 22.00.

149th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

149th New York, "Memoirs of the One Hundred Forty ninth New York Volunteer Infantry," by Captain George K. Collins. Foreword by Harry W. Pfanz. Originally published in 1891, at Syracuse, New York, this reprint is illustrated, roster, appendix, index, 480 pages, cost $ 36.00. The 149th New York was part of Major General William Tecumseh Sherman's "Crack Division," which never lost an Artillery piece or stand of colors. George K. Collins was the regiment's historian and released his book in 1891. The 149th was organized in the summer of 1862 in and around Syracuse, New York, and participated in numerous military encounters including the Eastern Theater at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Transferred to the Western Theater of war, it was at Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta and accompanied Sherman on his "March to the Sea." 1998 reprint, 426 pages, cost $ 39.50.

149th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

150th New York, "The Dutchess County Regiment," (the 150th Regiment of New York State Volunteer Infantry) "in the Civil War: Its Story as Told by Its Members," by Stephen G. Cook and Edward Bartlett. Originally published in 1907, by the Danbury Medical Printing Company, Danbury, Connecticut, this 512 page book is the only regimental history of the 150th New York. Its chapters have been written by different members of the unit, so there is some lack of continuity in style. It also contains brief biographies of a number of the members of the regiment, including one on Colonel (later Brevet Major General) John H. Ketcham. There is also a complete regimental roster which includes those members of the 150th who were transferred into the regiment from the 145th New York, after that unit was disbanded in December of 1863. Special thanks toPeter Bedrossian for submitting this information to me. Originally published in 1907, this book should prove hard to find, but if located, may cost around $ 600.00.

"Some years back I wrote sending you information about two books on the 150th New York. Well, my address has changed: its now: ltpete@att.net. The 2nd change is that both books on the 150th NY aer available from Higginson Books in Massachusetts. He has reprinted them, and they can be purchased for around $50.00 for the regimantal history and $40.00 for As seen From the Ranks. Thanks, Pete Bedrossian"

150th New York, "As Seen from the Ranks: A Boy in the Civil War," by Charles W. Benton. Originally published in 1902, by Putnam's, (Now G.P. Putman Printing Company). Benton's book chronicles his activity as a member of the 150th New York Infantry Regiment of Volunteers from his mustering in 1862 until his muster out in June of 1865. He served as a drummer and also as a soldier in the regiment. He also has an interesting chapter on his detached service as a hospital attendant. Special thanks to Peter Bedrossian pbedross@stern.nyu.edu for submitting this information to me. Originally published in 1902, this book should prove hard to find.

(Update on the above information provided me..) read on.. "Dear Sir, Your information about the book "As seen from the Ranks" about the 150th New York is incorrect. The author is Charles E. (Edward) Benton and he was a musician, but he was not a drummer. I had always been told he was a cornet player, but even that I have no proof of that. He was my Great-Great Grandfather." Jonathan Lane (thanks for clarifying the fuzziness that occurs over time).

150th New York, "A War to Petrify the Heart, The Civil War Letters of A Dutchess County, N.Y. Volunteer, Richard T. Van Wyck," edited by Virginia Hughes, with Chapter Introductions by John C. Quinn. "This collection is rather unique for the large numbers of letters (197) written by a single soldier. Van Wyck served for three years and wrote an average of two letters a week throughout the campaigns of the 150th Regiment from 1862-1865. He is a thoughtful correspondent, careful not to heed camp stories uncritically, and was very interested in the wider scale of the conflicts in which he participated. The compilation also makes excellent use of the resources of the East Fishkill Historical Society pertaining to the author and his family, period maps and lithographs, and also is supplimented by sections from Sgt. Van Wyck's day book during Sherman's March. There is an annotated roster of Co. K included in this excellent book. 381 pages, Black Dome Press (518) 734-6357. The paperback 1st edition of 1997 lists for $24.95. Dutchess County booksellers have it in stock." Thanks to Tim Abbott, Tim Abbott tabbott@tnc.org for submitting this information to me for use on my website.

151st New York, "Chronicles of the One Hundred and Fifty-first Regiment New York State Volunteer Infantry," compiled by Helena Howell. Originally published in 1911, this book may prove hard to find.

151st New York, "The Forgotten Regiment: The History of the 151st New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment," by Paul Stephen Beaudry, photographs, maps, appendices, footnotes, bibliography, 262 pages, cost $ 13.00.

152nd New York, "The Veteran Volunteers of Herkimer and Otsego Counties in the War of the Rebellion: Being a History of the One Hundred Fifty Second Regiment of New York Volunteer Infantry," by Henry Roback. Originally published in 1888 by L.C. Childs, Utica, New York, 196 pages, this is another of those books that are quite hard to find original copies to locate for your own personal collection. One copy is available for use at the NYSHA Library, Cooperstown, New York. If anybody has a copy for sell, please contact Elin Corwin at clonegal@worldnet.att.net

153rd New York Volunteer Infantry, "An Uncommon Soldier: The Civil War Letters of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, Alias Private Lyons Wakeman, One Hundred Fifty Third New York Infantry, New York State Volunteers, 1862-1864," by Sarah Rosetta Wakeman. Edited by Lauren Cook Burgess, Private Wakeman was known as Lyons Wakeman until wounded and sent to the hospital where it was discovered that he was really a she! Ms. Wakeman lies buried in the Chalmette National Cemetery in Metarie, Louisiana. Published in 1994 by the Minerva Center, with photos, 110 pages, costs $ 40.00.

154th New York, "The Hardtack Regiment, an Illustrated History of the One Hundred Fifty-Fourth Regiment, New York State Infantry Volunteers," co-authored by Michael J. Winey and Mark Dunkelman, great-grandson of Corporal John Langhans of Company H. Originally published in 1981 by the Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, New Brunswick, New Jersey, this book reflects the Civil War adventures of those boys from Cattaraugus and Chautauqua Counties who formed to fight and die together. Civil War Times Illustrated said "A highly recommended book for those interested in small unit histories." Blue & Gray Magazine: "A welcome addition to the bookshelves of regimental history collectors and general Civil War students who enjoy a glimpse of the too-often anonymous men who marched , fought, and died in the War." Military Images: "A worthy addition to the library of any collector of Civil War regimentals." According to the author, the has long been out of print, but people are finding it fairly easily on the Net.

154th New York, "Gettysburg's Unknown Soldier: The Life, Death, and Celebrity of Amos Humiston," by Mark H. Dunkelman. To be published in 1999 by Praeger Publishing, Westport, Connecticut. "He was found dead on the battlefield at Gettysburg, an unknown soldier with nothing to identify him but an ambrotype of his three children, clutched in his fingers. With the photograph as the single, sad clue to his identity, a publicity campaign to locate his family swept the North. Within a month, the bereaved widow and children were located in Portville, New York, and the devoted father was revealed to be Sergeant Amos Humiston of the 154th New York Volunteers. Using many previously untapped sources, this book tells the tale of 19th century war, sentiment, and popular culture in greater detail than ever before. William A. Frassanito notes: "Mr. Dunkelman has woven together a compelling narrative that should fascinate all who are interested in the broader, human implications of the tragic events that occurred at Gettysburg in 1863." James M. McPherson in his review states: "Mark Dunkelman has told Humiston's story with a verve and sensitivity that will leave no reader unmoved." Harry W. Pfanz writes: "Mark Dunkelman's thorough research and facile writing has produced the definitive account of one of Gettysburg's best human interest stories."

154th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website - with rosters, photos, etc.

155th New York Volunteer Regiment Infantry: Organized at New York City and mustered in November 18, 1862, at Newport News, Va. Left State for Newport News, Va., November 10, 1862. Attached to Newport News, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to December, 1862. Corcoran's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Corcoran's Brigade, King's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Defenses of Washington, to November, 1863. 1st Brigade, Corcoran's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to December, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Tyler's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Newport News, Va., until December, 1862, and at Suffolk, Va., until June, 1863. Expedition toward Blackwater January 8-10, 1863. Action at Deserted House January 30. Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. Edenton Road and Nansemond April 15. Edenton Road April 24. Providence Church Road, Nansemond River, May 3. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. Expedition to Blackwater June 12-18. Carrsville June 16. Blackwater June 17. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Moved to Washington, D.C., July 10, and duty in the Defenses of that city and guard duty on Orange & Alexandria Railroad until May, 1864. Actions at Sangster's Station December 15 and 17, 1863. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field May, 1864. Rapidan Campaign May 17-June 15. Spottsylvania Court House May 17-21. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton Road and White Oak Ridge March 29-31. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge, Farmville, April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville until May 2. March to Washington May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington until July. Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 105 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 71 Enlisted men by disease. Total 187.

155th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Re-enactor's Website

(another) 155th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Re-enactor's Website

156th New York, "The Saga of the "Mountain Legion," by Seward W. Osborne. Softcover, 36 pages, 1994, Longstreet House, price $ 7.00. Recruited in Greene and Ulster Counties, the 156th was organized in November, 1862, when three companies from Staten Island were added to complete its organization. The new organization was assigned to the 19th U.S. Army Corps, and went to Louisiana, arriving there in late December, 1862. The regiment saw action at Bayou Teche and Port Hudson, and although it participated in the Red River Campaign, it suffered the loss of only a single man. After moving to Washington, the 156th fought in the Shenandoah Valley, at Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek, losing more than 200 men in these battles. After service in North Carolina and Georgia, the regiment was mustered out of service in October, 1865. (reviewed by Dr. Richard A. Sauers), 32 pages, short story costing about $ 5.00. (not a bad write up for a 32 page tome).

157th New York, "Reminiscences and Letters of George Arrowsmith of New Jersey," by George Arrowsmith. Originally published in 1893, by John H. Cook, Publisher, Red Bank, New Jersey, this book may prove difficult to locate. Thanks (once again) to John Martine Jmartine@aol.com for contributing this information.

157th New York, "Company G: A Record of the Services of One Company of the One Hundred Fifty-seventh New York Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion," by A.A. Barlow. Originally published in 1899, by A. W. Hall, Syracuse, New York, this book may prove difficult to locate. Thanks to John Martine Jmartine@aol.com for contributing this information.

157th New York, "History of One Hundred Fifty-seventh New York Volunteer (Infantry) Regiment: 1862-1865, of the Men from Madison and Cortland Counties, New York," by Isabel Bracy. Published in the 1990's by Heart of the Lakes Publications, Interlaken, New York. (607) 532-4997. Costs around $ 12.00. Thanks (again) to John Martine Jmartine@aol.com for contributing this information.

157th New York, "A Regiment Remembered: The 157th New York Volunteers, from the Diary of Captain William Saxton," by members of the Cortland County, New York, Historical Society, Inc. Paperback, and published in 1996, the books costs around $ 26.00. The 157th New York fought at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Fort Wagner and other battles. The book also includes Colonel Place's reminiscences of Libby Prison, Lieutenant Bourne's time spent at the Prison at Belle Isle and extracts of Confederate Letters about Colonel Carmichael. With photos and index. Thanks to Sue Greenhagen, Head of Technical Services, SUNY Morrisville Library, Morrisville, NY, at greenhsh@morrisville.edu for submitting this info. to me.

157th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

158th New York, "First Empire Brigade," Organized at Brooklyn, N.Y., and mustered in November 10, 1862, at Norfolk, Va. Left State for Norfolk, Va., September 18, 1862. Attached to Viele's Brigade, Norfolk, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to December, 1862. Spinola's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to April, 1863. Jourdan's Independent Brigade, Dept. of North Carolina, to July, 1863. defenses of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to December, 1863. Sub-District of Beaufort, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to August, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Army Corps, Army of the James, to December, 1864. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 24th Army Corps, to May, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 24th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Norfolk and Suffolk, Va., until January, 1863. Moved to New Berne, N. C., and duty there until December, 1863. Expedition from New Berne to Trenton, Pollocksville, Young's Cross Roads and Swansborough March 6-10, 1863. Action at Deep Gully March 30. Expedition for relief of Little Washington April 7-10. Expedition toward Kinston April 16-21. Expedition to Trenton July 3-7. Quaker Bridge July 6. Expedition to Swift Creek July 17-20. Big Swift Creek July 18. Expedition to Winton July 25-31. Bear Inlet December 25. Destruction of Salt Works. Duty at Newport Barracks and in the District of Beaufort, N. C. until August, 1864. Expedition from Newport Barracks to Young's Cross Roads, Swansborough and Jackson December 27-29. Operations about New Berne against Whiting January 18-February 10, 1864. Reconnoissance toward Swansboro February 9. Expedition to Bogue and Bear Inlet March 25-26. Batchelor's Creek March 26. Expedition from Newport Barracks to Swansborough April 29-30. Expedition against Wilmington and Weldon Railroad June 20-25. Ordered to Petersburg, Va., August, 1864. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond, Va., August, 1864, to April, 1865. In trenches before Petersburg and on the Bermuda Hundred front until September 27. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Duty in trenches before Richmond until March, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Rice's Station April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Duty in the Department of Virginia until June. Mustered out at Richmond, Va., June 30, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 100th New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 45 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 83 Enlisted men by disease. Total 130.

161st New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website

164th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

164th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Re-enactor's Website

169th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

170th New York....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

176th New York Regiment of Volunteers ("Ironsides'): Organized at New York November 20, 1862, to January 10, 1863. Mustered in December 22, 1862. Company "K" mustered in January 10, 1863. Left State for New Orleans, La., January 11, 1863. Attached to defenses of New Orleans, La., Dept. of the Gulf, to February, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to June, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to July, 1864, and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to January, 1865. 3rd Brigade, Grover's Division, District of Savannah, Dept. of the South, to March, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, Dept. of North Carolina, to May, 1865. District of Savannah, Ga., Dept. of the South, to July, 1865. Districts of Augusta and Columbus, Ga., Dept. of Georgia, to April, 1866.

SERVICE--Duty in the District of LaFourche, defenses of New Orleans, La., guarding lines of New Orleans & Opelousas Railroad at Brashear City, LaFourche Crossing, Tigerville, Bonnet Carte, and other points until January, 1864. Actions at Pattersonville June 17 and 19, 1863. LaFourche Crossing June 19-21. Thibodeaux June 20 (Co. "D"). Fort Buchanan and Bayou Boeuf June 23. Brashear City June 23. Ordered to Franklin, La., January 4, 1864, and duty there until April. Red River Campaign April 15-May 22. Moved from Carrollton to Alexandria April 15-18. At Alexandria until May 13. Gov. Moore's Plantation May 3. Wilson's Farm May 5. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. At Morganza until July 3. Moved to New Orleans, then to Fortress Monroe, Va., and Washington, D.C., July 3-29. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Berryville September 8. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. At Kernstown and Winchester until January 5, 1865. Moved to Savannah, Ga., January 5-22, and duty there until March. Moved to Wilmington, N. C., March 5, then to Morehead City March 10, and duty there until April 8. Moved to Goldsboro, N. C., April 8, and duty there until May 2. Moved to Savannah May 2-7. Duty there and the Districts of Augusta, Columbus and Macon, Ga., Dept. of Georgia, until April, 1866. Mustered out at Savannah, Ga., April 27, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 30 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 146 Enlisted men by disease. Total 180.

179th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry: Organized at Elmira, N.Y., and mustered in by Companies as follows: Company "A" April 5, "B" April 13, "C" April 23, "D" May 11, "E" May 16, "F" May 25, "G" July 20, "H" September 13, and "K" September 15, 1864. Left State for Washington, D.C., by detachments. Companies "A" to "F" attached to defenses of Washington, D.C., May to June 11, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June 18, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, to July 1, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Rapidan Campaign, Cold Harbor, June 11-12, 1864. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864. Weldon Railroad August 18-21. Poplar Grove Church September 29-October 2. Jerusalem Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Fort Stedman March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Occupation of Petersburg April 3. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D C., April 20-27, and duty at Alexandria until June 8. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out at Alexandria, Va., June 8, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 61 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 118 Enlisted men by disease. Total 186.

185th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry: Organized at Syracuse, N.Y., and mustered in September 19, 1864. Company "K" mustered in September 21, 1864, and Company "F" September 25, 1864. Left State for Petersburg, Va., September 27, 1864. Attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1865.

SERVICE--Siege of Petersburg, Va., October 1, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28, 1864. Warren's Raid on Weldon Railroad December 7-12. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Lewis Farm, near Gravelly Run, March 29. Junction of Boydton and Quaker Roads March 29. White Oak Road March 31. Five Forks April 1. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D. C., May 1-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out at Washington, D.C., May 30, 1865. Veterans and recruits transferred to 5th New York Veteran Infantry·

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 53 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 39 Enlisted men by disease. Total 98.

187th REGIMENT INFANTRY Organized at Buffalo, N.Y., and mustered in October 13, 1864. Left State for Petersburg, Va., October 1 1864. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1865.

SERVICE-- Siege of Petersburg, Va., October 20, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28, 1864. Warren's Raid on Weldon Railroad December 7-12. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-6, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Lewis Farm, near Gravelly Run, March 29. Junction of Quaker and Boydton Roads March 29. White Oak Road March 31. Five Forks April 1. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D.C., May 1-12. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington, D.C., until July. Mustered out July 1, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 15 Enlisted men killed and mortally we;reded and 32 Enlisted men by disease. Total 47.

Read about Henry Stanley, 187th New York Volunteer Infantry, (as owned by Ronald A. Mosocco, owner of this website for your personal viewing only!)

Part 2 - continued...

188th New York Regiment Volunteer Infantry Website.

189th New York, "A History of the One Hundred Eighty-ninth Regiment New York Volunteers," by the Reverend William H. Rogers. Originally published in 1865, at New York, New York, this 113 page original book, if found, may cost around $ 95.00. 113 page reprint costs $ 29.00.

 

NEW YORK CAVALRY REGIMENTS

1st Regiment of New York Cavalry: ("LINCOLN") CAVALRY. "Carbine Rangers," "1st U.S. Vol. Cavalry," "Sabre Regiment." Organized at New York City July 16-August 31, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., by Detachments, July 31-September 7, 1861. Attached to Defenses of Washington and Alexandria to October 4, 1861. Franklin's and Heintzelman's Divisions, Army of the Potomac, to March 24, 1862. Cavalry, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1862. 1st Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to May, 1862. Cavalry, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July 8, 1862. 1st Cavalry Brigade, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. 4th Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1862. Averill's Cavalry Command, 8th Army Corps, Middle Dept., to November, 1862. defenses Upper Potomac, 8th Army Corps, Middle Dept., to January, 1863. Milroy's Command, Winchester, Va., 8th Army Corps, to February, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 8th Army Corps, February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 8th Army Corps, to June, 1863. Pierce's Brigade, Dept. of the Susquehanna, to August, 1863. McReynolds' Cavalry Brigade, Dept. of West Virginia, to November, 1863. Cavalry Brigade, 1st Division, Army of West Virginia, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of West Virginia, to June, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of West Virginia, to July, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of West Virginia, to August, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of West Virginia, to December, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Middle Military Division and Army Potomac, to March, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty In the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Scout to Accotink August 18, 1861. Skirmish at Pohick Church August 18 (Co. "C"). Reconnoissance to Pohick Church and Accotink River November 12 (Cos. "B," "C" and "G"). Occoquan November 12 (Co. "G"). Fairfax Court House November 27. Annandale Church December 2. Sangster's Station March 9, 1862. Burke Station March 10. Moved to the Virginia Peninsula. (Co. "E" detached as escort to wagon trains on the Peninsula) Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. West Point May 7. Mechanicsville May 22. Hanover C. H. May 27. Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Hanover C. H. June 13. Oak Grove June 25. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Mechanicsville June 26. Gaines Mill and Garnett's Farm June 27. Garnett's and Golding's Farms June 28. Savage Station and Willis Church June 29. White Oak Swamp June 30. Glendale June 30. Malvern Cliff June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. Cold Harbor July 1. Crew's Farm, Carter's Hill, July 2. Gum Run Swamp July 3. Long Bridge Road July 9. Harrison's Landing July 31. Stevensburg, Raccoon Ford and Brandy Station August 20. Cacapon Bridge, Md., September 6. Seneca Creek September 6. Hyattstown September 9-10. Frederick City September 12. Emmettsburg September 13-15. Antietam September 16-17. Williamsport September 19. Near Shepherdstown September 20. Blue's Gap, W. Va., October 2 and 4. Hanging Rock October 2. Cacapon Bridge October 4. Hanging Rock October 4. North River Mills, South Branch, October 6. Cacapon Bridge October 6. White's Ford October 10. Hanging Rock October 17. South Branch October 18. Springfield October 27. North River Mills October 29. French's Store October 29. Occoquan Ferry November 4. Pughstown November 5. Lockhart's Gap November 6. Paw Paw Tunnel November 6. Moorefield, South Fork Potomac, November 9 (Detachment). Romney Bridge November 10. Near Springfield November 15. Near Winchester November 22 and December 4. Darkesville December 11. Bunker Hill December 12. Charlestown December 25. Woodstock January 7, 1863. Newtown and Strasburg January 17. Devil's Hole January 26. Millwood February 6. Near Winchester February 9. Woodstock February 15. Kernstown and Strasburg February 26. Snicker's Ferry April 13. Berry's Ferry and Front Royal April 13. Paris April 14. Mansfield April 17. Millwood April 21. Moorefield April 27. Scout in Hampshire County, W. Va., May 4-9. Scout from Snicker's Ferry May 12-14. Upperville May 13. Middleburg May 13. Berry's Ferry May 16. Upperville May 28. Berryville June 5. Piedmont June 8. Goose Creek June 9. Near White Post and Millwood June 13. Berryville and Bunker Hill June 13. Opequan Creek, near Winchester, June 13. Martinsburg June 14. Winchester June 14-15. Milroy's retreat June 15-July 1. Williamsport, Md., June 15. Hancock June 16. Greencastle, Pa.. June 20 and 22. Shippensburg June 23. Near Harper's Ferry June 23. Cashtown June 25, Carlisle June 25-26. Harper's Ferry June 26-27. Near Kingston June 27. McConnellsburg, Pa., June 29. Hancock, Md., June 29. Keedysville June 29. Near Kingston June 29. Near Arendtsville June 30. Near Fayette and near Carlisle July 1. Near McConnellsburg July 2. Near Bendersville, Quaker Vale and Falling Water July 3. Cranstown and Frederick City July 4. Cunningham Cross Roads July 5. Near Greencastle, Pa., July 5 (Detachment). Waynesboro July 6. Waterloo July 6. Antietam Creek July 8. Williamsport July 10. Sharpsburg July 12. Bendersville July 14. Pine Grove Furnace July 16. Shepherdstown July 17 and 23. Mount Rock July 22. Martinsburg July 23. Bull Run Mountain and near Winchester August 14. Smithfield August 21. Berryville August 22. Leesburg September 1. Expedition from Martinsburg September 2-23. Bloomer's Gap September 2. Middletown September 5. Near Winchester September 9. Smithfield September 15-16 and 19. Strasburg September 19. Back Creek Valley October 14. Hedgesville October 15. Berryville October 17. Charlestown October 18. Summit Point October 27. Winchester October 31. Newtown November 6. Expedition to New Market November 15-18. Woodstock and Edenburg November 16. Mt. Jackson November 16. Middletown November 17. Edenburg November 18. Wells' Demonstration from Kanawha Valley December 10-24. Mt. Jackson December 12. Near Strasburg December 13. Harrisonburg December 15. Mt. Jackson December 20. Regiment reenlisted January 1, 1864. Scout to Woodstock. Va., January 23-25. Newtown and Woodstock January 23. Mechanicsburg Gap February 2. Moorefield February 4. Front Royal February 8. Charlestown February 10. Moorefield February 11. Upperville February 20. Custer's Raid into Albemarle County February 28-March 1 (Detachment). Near Charlottesville February 29. Stannardsville March 1. Cablestown March 10. Winchester April 19-20. Near Middletown and New Market April 24 (Detachment). Sigel's Expedition from Martinsburg to New Market April 30-May 16. Upperville May 1. Near Berryville May 6. Upperville May 7. Millwood May 9. Brock's Gap May 10. Woodstock, Luray Gap and near New Market May 13. Rude's Hill May 14. New Market May 14-15. Burnt Bridge May 15. Paris May 16. Salem May 17. Hunter's Raid to Lynchburg May 26-July 1. New Market May 26. Woodstock May 31. Harrisonburg June 2. Piedmont June 5. Occupation of Staunton June 6. Near Staunton June 8. Waynesboro June 10. Lexington June 13. Buchanan June 14. New London June 17. Diamond Hill June 17. Lynchburg June 17-18. Liberty June 19. Buford's Gap June 20. Catawba Mountains June 21. Salem June 21. Leetown June 26. Charlestown and Big Sewell Mountain June 27. Leetown July 3. Martinsburg July 3. Williamsport July 5. Frederick City July 8. Ashby's Gap July 9. White's Ford July 14. Harper's Ferry July 15. Lovettsville and Hillsboro July 15. Purcellville July 16. White's Ford and Snicker's Ferry July 17-18. Ashby's Gap July 18-19. Near Kernstown July 23. Kernstown. Winchester, July 24. Bunker Hill and Martinsburg July 25. Bloomer's Gap July 27. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Moorefield August 7. Strasburg August 15. Leetown and Berryville August 16. Martinsburg August 19. Charlestown August 21. Bolivar Heights August 23. Falling Waters August 24. Halltown August 26. Williamsport August 26. Martinsburg August 31. Stephenson's Depot September 1. Buckletown September 1-3. Darkesville, near Bunker Hill, and Martinsburg, September 2. Bunker Hill September 2-3. Darkesville September 3. Stephenson's Depot September 5. Darkesville September 10. Bunker Hill September 13. Near Berryville September 14. Burnt Factory September 17. Martinsburg September 18. Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Strasburg September 21. Fisher's Hill September 22. Woodstock September 23. Mt. Jackson September 23-24. Forest Hill or Timberville September 24. Harrisonburg September 25. Brown's Gap September 26. Weyer's Cave September 26-27. Luray Valley October 2-3. Rapidan River October 5. Big Springs October 7. Milford October 9. White Post October 14. Cedar Creek October 19. Dry Run October 23. Milford October 25-26. Rood's Hill November 1. Newtown and Nineveh November 12. Rood's Hill November 22. Dicksville December 9. Raid to Gordonsville December 19-28. Liberty Mills December 21. Jack's Shop, near Gordonsville, December 23. Near Ashby's Gap December 27. Sheridan's Raid from Winchester February 27-March 25, 1865. Mr. Crawford February 28. Occupation of Staunton March 2. Waynesboro March 2. Haydensville March 12. Beaver Dam Station March 15. White House March 23. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Dinwiddie Court House March 29-31. Five Forks April 1. Namozine Church April 3. Jettersville April 4. Amelia Court House April 5. Farmville April 5-6. Sailor's Creek April 6. Stony Point April 7. Appomattox Station April 8. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Movement to North Carolina April 23-29. March to Washington, D.C., May. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 27, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 43 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 119 Enlisted men by disease, etc. Total 168.

1st Regiment of Veteran New York Cavalry: Organized at Geneva, N.Y., and mustered in: Company "A" July 31, 1863; Company "B" September 8, 1863; Companies "C" to "K" at Elmira, N.Y., October 10, 1863; Company "L" November 7, 1863, and Company "M" November 19, 1863. Moved to Washington, D.C., as fast as mustered, and duty in the defenses of that city to February, 1864. Attached to Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to February, 1864. Cavalry Brigade, 1st Division, Army of West Virginia, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of West Virginia, to July, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of West Virginia, to August, 1864. Remount Camp at Cumberland, Md., to October, 1864. 1st Separate Brigade, District of the Kanawha, Dept. of West Virginia, to March, 1865. Cavalry, Dept. of West Virginia, to July, 1865.

SERVICE:--Action near Upperville, Va., February 20. 1864. Snickersville March 6. Kablestown March 10. Sigel's Expedition from Martinsburg to New Market April 30-May 16. Near Paris and Salem May 10. Mt. Jackson May 13. New Market May 15. Hunter's Raid on Lynchburg May 26-July 1. Woodstock May 28. Newtown May 29-30. Woodstock May 31. New Market June 1. Harrisonburg June 3-4. Piedmont June 5. Occupation of Staunton June 6. Waynesboro June 10. Cheat Mountain June 11. Lexington June 13. Buchanan June 14. Diamond Hill June 17. Lynchburg June 17-18. Liberty June 19. Buford's Gap June 20. Catawba Mountains and Salem June 21. White Sulphur Springs June 25. Bunker Hill June 28 and July 2. Near Martinsburg July 2. Leetown and Martinsburg July 3. Sharpsburg, Md., July 4. Sandy Hook July 6. Near Hillsboro July 15-16. Snicker's Ferry July 17-18. Ashby's Gap and Berry's Ford July 19. Charlestown July 22. Near Kernstown July 23. Kernstown, Winchester, July 24. Bunker Hill and Martinsburg July 25. Duffield Station August 3. Cedar Creek August 12. Berryville August 16. Near Charlestown August 21-22. Falling Waters August 24. Duty at Remount Camp, Cumberland, Md., until November. Operations in Kanawha Valley against Witcher November 5-12. Newtown and Nineveh November 12. Rude's Hill, near Mt. Jackson, November 22. Duty in District of the Kanawha and in the Shenandoah Valley until July, 1865. Mustered out July 20, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 56 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 89 Enlisted men by disease, etc. Total 150.

1st Regiment of New York Mounted Rifles Cavalry: (Sometimes designated 7th New York Cavalry.) First organized at New York City as a Squadron of two Companies, "A" and "B," for duty in the Dept. of Virginia, and; mustered in at Fortress Monroe, Va., July 30, 1861. Companies "C" and "D" organized at Newburg, N.Y., and mustered in September 18 and October 16, 1861. Companies "E," "F," "G" and "H" organized at New York City and mustered in June to August, 1862. Companies "I," "K," "L" and "M" organized August and September, 1862. Companies "A" and "B" left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., July, 1861; "C" and "D" December 6, 1861; "E," "F," "G" and "H" August, 1862, and "I," "K," "L" and "M" September 19, 1862. Attached to District of Fortress Monroe, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1862. Unattached, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1862, Unattached, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. Cavalry, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. Cavalry Brigade, U.S. Forces, Portsmouth, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to October, 1863. U.S. Forces, Yorktown, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1864. Cavalry Brigade and Wistar's Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to April, 1864. Unattached Cavalry, Army of the James, to July, 1864. Cavalry Brigade, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to October, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to March, 1865. Headquarters, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1865. District of Eastern Virginia, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty at Fortress Monroe and at Camp Hamilton, Va., until May, 1862. Action in Hampton Roads, Newport News, March 8-9, 1862, between "Monitor" and "Merrimac." Howard's Bridge April 4 (Cos. "A" and "B"). Near Lee's Mills April 5 (Cos. "A" and "B"). Tranter's Creek, Norfolk, Va., May 10. Suffolk, Va., May 14. Reconnoissance to Edenton, N. C., May 27-31. Hertford, N. C., June 30. Duty at Suffolk, Va., until June, 1863. Smithfield July 10, 1862. South Mills September 4. Zuni September 15. Blackwater September 28. Blackwater near Zuni October 4. Zuni October 20 and 25. Near Franklin October 31. Zuni November 3. Providence Church November 12. Blackwater Bridge and Zuni November 14. Zuni Bridge November 15. Near Carrsville November 17. Franklin November 18. Zuni November 25. South Quay December 7. Zuni near Blackwater December 8 and 11-13. Joyner's Ford December 12. Isle of Wight Court House December 22. Providence Church Road December 28. Ely's House near Providence Church January 9, 1863. Burnt Ordinary January 11. Jacksonville, N. C., January 20. Deserted House January 30. Edenton, N. C., February 7. Reconnoissance from Suffolk March 7-9. Chuckatuck March 7. Near Windsor March 9. Blackwater Bridge March 31. Siege of Suffolk April 11-May 4. South Quay Road April 11. Edenton, Providence Church and Somerton Roads April 12-13. Edenton Road April 15. Providence Church Road, Chuckatuck and Reed's Ferry May 3. Lake Drummond May 4. Blackwater Bridge May 12. Near Suffolk and Cartsville May 16. Scott's Mills May 17. Near Blackwater, Windsor Road, May 18. Antioch and Barber's Cross Roads May 23. Blackwater Bridge May 31. South Mills June 8. South Quay Road June 12. Camden, N. C., July 5. Currituck July 12 and 22. Raid to destroy railroad at Weldon July 25-August 2. Jackson July 28. Expedition from Portsmouth to Edenton, N. C., August 11-19. Edenton August 15. Pasquotank August 18. Expedition from Williamsburg to Bottom's Bridge August 26-29. Barhamsville, Slatersville, New Kent Court House, C rump's Cross Roads and Bottom's Bridge August 29. Expedition to Matthews County October 4-9. Near Williamsburg November 8. Charles City Cross Roads November 16. Expedition to Charles City Court House December 12-14. Charles City Court House December 13. New Kent Court House January 19, 1864. Scouting from Williamsburg January 19-24. Wistar's Expedition toward Richmond February 6-8. Bottom's Bridge February 7. Expedition from Yorktown to New Kent Court House in aid of Kilpatrick March 1-4. White House March 2. Expedition into King and Queen County March 9-12. Belleroy March 9. Carlton's Store March 10. Matthews County Court House March 25. Expedition from Williamsburg April 27-29. Twelve Mile Ordinary April 27. Twelve Mile Ordinary April 28. Butler's operations on south side of James River and against Richmond and Petersburg May 4-28. Chester Station, Port Walthall Junction, May 7. Swift Creek or Arrow field Church May 8-10. Proctor's Creek May 11. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Wier Bottom Church May 12. Clover Hill Junction May 14. Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Petersburg & Richmond Railroad May 16. Bottom's Church May 17. Bermuda Hundred May 18-26. Walthall Junction June 2. West Point June 5. Petersburg June 8-10. Assaults on Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to March 27, 1865. Deep Bottom June 23, 1864. Surrey Court House July 11. Richmond & Petersburg Railroad July 21. Deep Bottom July 27-29. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Cox's Mills September 16. Chaffin's Farm September 29-October 1. Darbytown Road October 13 and 16. Fair Oaks October 27-28. Cone's Creek December 21. White Oak Swamp February 5, 1865. Expedition from Fort Monroe to Fredericksburg March 5-8. Expedition from Fort Monroe into Westmoreland County March 11-13. Williamsburg March 11. Near Windsor March 12. Near New Kent Court House March 17. Seven Pines March 18. White House March 19. Expedition from Deep Bottom to near Weldon, N. C., March 28-April 11. Weldon Railroad April 4. Murfreesboro, N. C., April 5. Somerton April 7. Near Jackson April 17. Duty at Fredericksburg, Va., Dept. of Va., until July. Mustered out by consolidation with 3rd New York Cavalry, July 21, 1865, to form 4th Provisional Cavalry.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 30 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 124 Enlisted men by disease, etc. Total 159.

1st New York Cavalry, "Boots and Saddles, A History of the First Volunteer Cavalry of the War, Known as the First New York (Lincoln) Cavalry, and Also As the Sabre Regiment," by James H. Stevenson. Originally published in 1879 by the Patriot Publishing Company, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, this book may prove hard to locate.

1st New York Dragoons, "19th New York Cavalry"....fact..."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

1st New York Dragoons, "19th New York Cavalry" Organized at Portage, N.Y., as 130th Infantry and mustered in September 2, 1862. Left State for Suffolk, Va., September 6, 1862. Attached to Provisional Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to October, 1862. Spinola's Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to December, 1862. Gibbs' Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to January, 1863. Terry's Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to April, 1863. Terry's Brigade, Corcoran's 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Provost Marshal General's Command, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1863. Designation of Regiment changed to 19th Cavalry August 11, 1863, and to 1st Dragoons September 10, 1863. Reserve Cavalry Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 3rd (Reserve) Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah and Army Potomac, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Suffolk, Va., until May, 1863. Expedition from Suffolk December 1-3, 1862. Action on the Blackwater near Franklin December 2. Reconnoissances from Suffolk to Blackwater December 23 and 28. Near. Suffolk and at Providence Church December 28. Expedition toward Blackwater January 8-10, 1863. Deserted House January 30, Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. South Quay Road, Suffolk, April 17. Suffolk April 19. Nansemond River May 3. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. South Quay Road June 12. Franklin June 14. Blackwater June 16-17. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Expedition from White House to South Anna River July 1-7. Baltimore Cross Roads July 4. Ordered to Washington, D.C. Ashby's Gap July 19. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Between Centreville and Warrenton September 22. Manassas Junction October 17. Bristoe Station October 18. Buckland Mills October 18-19. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Culpeper Court House November 20. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Barnett's Ford February 6-7. Rapidan Campaign May-June, 1864. Wilderness May 5-7. Todd's Tavern May 7-8. Spottsylvania May 8. Sheridan's Raid to James River May 9-24. Davenport Bridge, North Anna River, May 10. Yellow Tavern and Ground Squirrel Bridge May 11. Fortifications of Richmond and Meadow Bridge May 12. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Hanovertown May 27. Haw's Shop May 28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Old Church and Mattadequi Creek May 30. Cold Harbor May 31-June 6. Sheridan's Travillian Raid June 7-24. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Newark or Mallory's Ford Cross Roads June 12. White House or St. Peter's Church June 21. Black Creek or Tunstall's Station June 21. Jones' Bridge June 23. Charles City Court House June 24. Before Petersburg and Richmond June 27-July 30. Demonstration north of the James River July 27-29, Deep Bottom July 27-28. Malvern Hill July 28. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Shephardstown August 8. Near Stone Chapel, Berryville Pike, August 10. Tell Gate near White Post and Newtown August 11. Cedar Creek August 12. Cedarville August 13 and 16. Summit Point August 21. Near Kearneysville and Shephardstown August 25. Leetown and Smithfield August 28. Smithfield Crossing, Opequan Creek, August 29. Bunker Hill September 13. Sevier's Ford, Opequan Creek, September 15. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Middletown and Strasburg September 20. Fisher's Hill September 21. Near Edenburg September 23. Front Royal, Mt. Jackson, September 23-24. New Market September 24. Port Republic September 26-27. McGaugheysville September 28. Mr. Crawford October 2. Tom's Brook, "Woodstock Races," October 8-9. Hupp's Hill near Strasburg October 14. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Fisher's Hill October 20. Liberty Mills October 22. Berryville October 28. Near White Post November 1. Near Kernstown November 11. Newtown November 12. Cedar Creek November 19. Expedition from Winchester into Fauquier and Loudoun Counties November 28-December 3. Bloomfield November 29. Expedition to Gordonsville December 19-28. Liberty Mills December 21. Jack's Shop December 22. Near Gordonsville December 23. Sheridan's Raid from Winchester February 27-March 25, 1865. Occupation of Staunton March 2. Action at Waynesboro March 2. Near Charlottesville March 3. Goochland Court House March 11. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Dinwiddie Court House March 30-31. Five Forks April 1. Scott's Cross Roads April 2. Deep Creek April 3. Tabernacle Church or Beaver Pond Creek April 4. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Station April 8. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Expedition to Danville April 23-29. March to Washington, D.C., May. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 30, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 126 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 130 Enlisted men by disease, etc. Total 261.

1st New York Dragoons, aka 19th New York Cavalry, "History of the First New York Dragoons," by (Civil War) Reverend James Bowens. This first edition was originally published in 1900, Lyons, Michigan. See their capsule history listed below under the 19th New York Cavalry Regiment.

1st New York "Lincoln" Cavalry, From April 19th, 1861 to July 7th, 1865," by William H. Beach, who was the First Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 1st New York Cavalry. Originally published in 1892, this 1988, 589 page reprint by Bacon Race Books, Annandale, VA, costs $ 40.00.

1st New York Regiment of Mounted Rifles: (Sometimes designated 7th New York Cavalry.) First organized at New York City as a Squadron of two Companies, "A" and "B," for duty in the Dept. of Virginia, and; mustered in at Fortress Monroe, Va., July 30, 1861. Companies "C" and "D" organized at Newburg, N.Y., and mustered in September 18 and October 16, 1861. Companies "E," "F," "G" and "H" organized at New York City and mustered in June to August, 1862. Companies "I," "K," "L" and "M" organized August and September, 1862. Companies "A" and "B" left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., July, 1861; "C" and "D" December 6, 1861; "E," "F," "G" and "H" August, 1862, and "I," "K," "L" and "M" September 19, 1862. Attached to District of Fortress Monroe, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1862. Unattached, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1862, Unattached, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. Cavalry, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. Cavalry Brigade, U.S. Forces, Portsmouth, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to October, 1863. U.S. Forces, Yorktown, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1864. Cavalry Brigade and Wistar's Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to April, 1864. Unattached Cavalry, Army of the James, to July, 1864. Cavalry Brigade, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to October, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to March, 1865. Headquarters, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1865. District of Eastern Virginia, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Fortress Monroe and at Camp Hamilton, Va., until May, 1862. Action in Hampton Roads, Newport News, March 8-9, 1862, between "Monitor" and "Merrimac." Howard's Bridge April 4 (Cos. "A" and "B"). Near Lee's Mills April 5 (Cos. "A" and "B"). Tranter's Creek, Norfolk, Va., May 10. Suffolk, Va., May 14. Reconnoissance to Edenton, N. C., May 27-31. Hertford, N. C., June 30. Duty at Suffolk, Va., until June, 1863. Smithfield July 10, 1862. South Mills September 4. Zuni September 15. Blackwater September 28. Blackwater near Zuni October 4. Zuni October 20 and 25. Near Franklin October 31. Zuni November 3. Providence Church November 12. Blackwater Bridge and Zuni November 14. Zuni Bridge November 15. Near Carrsville November 17. Franklin November 18. Zuni November 25. South Quay December 7. Zuni near Blackwater December 8 and 11-13. Joyner's Ford December 12. Isle of Wight Court House December 22. Providence Church Road December 28. Ely's House near Providence Church January 9, 1863. Burnt Ordinary January 11. Jacksonville, N. C., January 20. Deserted House January 30. Edenton, N. C., February 7. Reconnoissance from Suffolk March 7-9. Chuckatuck March 7. Near Windsor March 9. Blackwater Bridge March 31. Siege of Suffolk April 11-May 4. South Quay Road April 11. Edenton, Providence Church and Somerton Roads April 12-13. Edenton Road April 15. Providence Church Road, Chuckatuck and Reed's Ferry May 3. Lake Drummond May 4. Blackwater Bridge May 12. Near Suffolk and Cartsville May 16. Scott's Mills May 17. Near Blackwater, Windsor Road, May 18. Antioch and Barber's Cross Roads May 23. Blackwater Bridge May 31. South Mills June 8. South Quay Road June 12. Camden, N. C., July 5. Currituck July 12 and 22. Raid to destroy railroad at Weldon July 25-August 2. Jackson July 28. Expedition from Portsmouth to Edenton, N. C., August 11-19. Edenton August 15. Pasquotank August 18. Expedition from Williamsburg to Bottom's Bridge August 26-29. Barhamsville, Slatersville, New Kent Court House, C rump's Cross Roads and Bottom's Bridge August 29. Expedition to Matthews County October 4-9. Near Williamsburg November 8. Charles City Cross Roads November 16. Expedition to Charles City Court House December 12-14. Charles City Court House December 13. New Kent Court House January 19, 1864. Scouting from Williamsburg January 19-24. Wistar's Expedition toward Richmond February 6-8. Bottom's Bridge February 7. Expedition from Yorktown to New Kent Court House in aid of Kilpatrick March 1-4. White House March 2. Expedition into King and Queen County March 9-12. Belleroy March 9. Carlton's Store March 10. Matthews County Court House March 25. Expedition from Williamsburg April 27-29. Twelve Mile Ordinary April 27. Twelve Mile Ordinary April 28. Butler's operations on south side of James River and against Richmond and Petersburg May 4-28. Chester Station, Port Walthall Junction, May 7. Swift Creek or Arrow field Church May 8-10. Proctor's Creek May 11. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Wier Bottom Church May 12. Clover Hill Junction May 14. Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Petersburg & Richmond Railroad May 16. Bottom's Church May 17. Bermuda Hundred May 18-26. Walthall Junction June 2. West Point June 5. Petersburg June 8-10. Assaults on Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to March 27, 1865. Deep Bottom June 23, 1864. Surrey Court House July 11. Richmond & Petersburg Railroad July 21. Deep Bottom July 27-29. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Cox's Mills September 16. Chaffin's Farm September 29-October 1. Darbytown Road October 13 and 16. Fair Oaks October 27-28. Cone's Creek December 21. White Oak Swamp February 5, 1865. Expedition from Fort Monroe to Fredericksburg March 5-8. Expedition from Fort Monroe into Westmoreland County March 11-13. Williamsburg March 11. Near Windsor March 12. Near New Kent Court House March 17. Seven Pines March 18. White House March 19. Expedition from Deep Bottom to near Weldon, N. C., March 28-April 11. Weldon Railroad April 4. Murfreesboro, N. C., April 5. Somerton April 7. Near Jackson April 17. Duty at Fredericksburg, Va., Dept. of Va., until July. Mustered out by consolidation with 3rd New York Cavalry, July 21, 1865, to form 4th Provisional Cavalry.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 30 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 124 Enlisted men by disease, etc. Total 159.

2nd New York Cavalry, aka "the Harris Light"....fact..."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

2nd New York Cavalry, "History of the Second New York Cavalry," by Captain Williard Galzier. Originally published in the 1880's.

2nd New York Veteran Cavalry Website.

3rd New York Volunteer Cavalry: Regiment was organized by Companies as follows: "A" at Rochester July 17th, "E" at Syracuse July 30th, "C" at Rochester, August 4th, D at Albany, August 12th, E at Elmira, August 22nd, "F" at Rochester, August 20th, "G" at Boonville, August 21st, "H" at Rochester August 27th, "I" at Syracuse, August 27th, "K" organized as Company "G," 13th New York Infantry, at Elmira, N.Y., May 14th (attached August 23rd); "L" at Cincinnati, Ohio, September 13th, 1861, and "M" at Albany September 10th, 1862. Regiment organized at Meridian Hill, Washington, D.C., September 9th, 1861. Attached to Banks' Division, Army of the Potomac (5 Cos.), and Stone's Division, Army of the Potomac (6 Cos.), to December, 1861. Stone's Corps of Observation to March, 1862. Defenses of Washington, D.C., to April, 1862. Unattached, Dept. of North Carolina, to December, 1862. Unattached, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to May, 1863. Cavalry Brigade, 18th Corps, to July, 1863. Defenses of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to October, 1863. Heckman's Command, Newport News, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to December, 1863. Heckman's Command, Portsmouth, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to April 1864. 1st Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Army of the James, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to December, 1864. Norfolk, Va., to January, 1865. Portsmouth, Va., to March, 1865. Suffolk, Va., to June, 1865. Norfolk, Va., to July, 1865.

SERVICE: Duty In the Defenses of Washington, D.C., and on the Upper Potomac until April, 1862. Operations on the Potomac October 21st-24th, 1861. Near Goose Creek and on Leesburg Road October 21st. Ball's Bluff October 21st. Near Edward's Ferry October 22nd. Bunker Hill, W. Va., March 5th, 1862. Winchester March 10th. Ordered to Dept. of North Carolina April 6th. Haughton's Mills April 27th. Near Burnt Church May 7th. Reconnoissance toward Trenton May 15th-16th. Trenton Bridge May 15th. Young's Cross Roads and Pollocksville May 15th-16th. Tranter's Creek May 30th (Co. "I"). Greenville Road May 1st. Tranter's Creek June 2nd, 5th and 24th (Co. "I"). Swift Creek Bridge June 28th (Detachment). Tranter's Creek July 10th. Expedition to Trenton and Pollocksville July 24th-28th. Trenton and Pollocksville July 25th. Mill Creek July 26th (Co. "K"). Pollocksville July 26th (Co. "K"). Reconnoissance to Young's Cross Roads July 26th-29th (Detachments. Near Young's Cross Roads July 27. Trenton and Kinston Road August 6. Reconnoissance to Swansboro August 14-15. Washington, N. C., September 6 (Cos. "D," "G," "H," "I" and "L"). Tranter's Creek September 9. Washington October 5 Pingo Creek October 29. Expedition from Newberne October 30-November 12. Rawle's Mills November 2. Near Tarboro November 5. Demonstration on Newberne November 11. Core Creek November 18. Foster's Expedition tp Goldsboro December 11-20. Kinston Road December 11-12. Southwest Creek December 13-14. Kinston December 14. Whitehall Bridge December 15. Olive Station, Goshen Swamp and Whitehall December 16. Dudley Station, Thompson's Bridge and Goldsboro December 17. Core Creek January 8, 1863. Reconnoissance to Pollocksville, Tranter's, Young's Cross Roads snd Onslow January 17-21. Pollocksville and Northeast River January 17. Near Tranter's January 18. Young's Cross Roads January- 18-19. White Oak Creek January 19. Near Jacksonville January 20. Sandy Ridge and near Washington February 13. Near Newberne February 27. Expedition to Swann's Quarter March 1-6 (Co. "F"). Near Fairfield March 3 (Co. "F"). Skeet March 3. Near Fairfield and Swann's Quarter March 3-4 (Co. "F"). Demonstration on Kinston March 6-8 (Cos. "A," "E" and "H"). Core Creek March 7 (Cos. "A," "E" and "H"). Dover March 7 (Co. "H"). Expedition to Mattamuskeet Lake March 7-14 (Co. "F"). Deep Gully New Berne, March 13-14 (Detachment). Siege of Washington March 30-April 20 (1 Co.). White Forks April 3. Gum Swamp April 4. Swann's Quarter April 4. Rodman's Point April 4-5 (1 Co.). Near Dover, Core Creek and Young's Cross Roads April 7. Little Swift Creek April 8. Blount's and Swift Creek April 9. Expedition to Swift Creek Village April 13-21 (Detachment). Trent Road April 13-14. Near Newberne April 15. Peletier's Mills April 16. Expedition toward Kinston April 16-21 (Co. "H"). Expedition to Little Washington April 17-19 (Detachment). Railroad Crossing, Core Creek, April 17-18. Big Swift Creek April 19. Sandy Ridge April 20 (Co. "H"). Expedition toward Kinston April 27-May 1 (Detachment). Wise's Cross Roads and Dover Road April 28. Near Core Creek April 29. Core Creek April 30. Evans' Mills May 5. Peletter's Mills May 5 (4 Cos.). Stony Creek May 7 (4 Cos.). Demonstration on Kinston May 20-23 (4 Cos.). Gum Swamp May 22 (4 Cos.). Bachelor's Creek May 23. Washington May 24. Tranter's Creek, Jacksonville. May 31-June 2. Plymouth June 16. Scout to Ccre Creek June 17-18. Raid on Wilmington & Weldon Railroad July 3-7 (Detachment). Trenton July 8. Hallsville July 4. Warsaw and Kenensville July 5. Tar River Expedition July 18-24. Swift Creek July 18. Near Greenville July 19. Tarboro and Rocky Mount Station July 20. Sparta July 20. Hookerstown July 21. Swift Creek and Street's Ferry July 22. Scupperton July 22. Pollocksville July 26. Near New Berne October 7. Camden Court House and Dismal Swamp November 3. Operations about New Berne against Whiting January 18-February 4, 1864. Wistar's Expedition toward Richmond February 6-8, 1864. Bettom's Bridge and Baltimore Cross Roads February 7. Kautz's Raid against Petersburg & Weldon Railroad May 5-11. Wall's Bridge May 5. Stony Creek Station, Weldon Railroad, May 7. Nottaway Railroad Bridge May 8. White's Bridge, Nottaway River, May 8-9. Kautz's Raid on Richmond & Danville Railroad May 12-17. Flat Creek Bridge, near Chula Depot, May 14. Belcher's Mills May 16. Bermuda Hundred May 17-30. Near Hatcher's Run June 2. Near Petersburg June 9. Baylor's Farm June 15. Assaults on Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16-December 1, 1864. Wilson's Raid on South Side & Danville Railroad June 22-30. Roanoke Bridge June 25. Sappony Church or Stony Creek June 28. Ream's Station June 29. Deep Bottom July 27-29. Malvern Hill August 1. Yellow Tavern August 19-21. Ream's Station August 23-25. Lee's Mills August 31. Reconnoissance to Sycamore Church September 5-6. Prince George Court House September 15. Jerusalem Plank Road and Sycamore Church September 16. Prince George Court House September 22. Chaffin's Farm September 28-30. Charles City Cross Roads October 1. Derbytown Road October 7 and 13. Johnson's Farm and New Market Road October 7. Chaffin's Farm October 8. Charles City Cross Roads October 20. Fair Oaks October 27-28. Charles City Cross Roads November 1. Darbytown Road November 15. Moved to Norfolk, Va., December, and duty there until January, 1865. Operations about Broadwater Ferry, Chowan River, December 11-19. Duty at Suffolk, Portsmouth and Norfolk until July. Scout to South Quay January 2, 1865 (Cos. "A," "B," "C," "H" and "L"). Expedition to Murfree's Depot, N. C., March 10-11. South Quay March 11. Consolidated with 1st New York Mounted Rifles July 21, 1865, to form 4th Regiment Provisional Cavalry.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 45 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 150 Enlisted men by disease. Total 199.

5th New York Volunteer Cavalry: "1st Ira Harris Guard." Regiment recruited at New York City as Ira Harris Cavalry. Designated Ira Harris Guard October 16,1861, and 5th New York Cavalry November 14, 1861. Companies mustered in as follows: "A" August 15, "B" August 21, "C" September 3, "D" October 1, "E" October 7, "F" September 21, "G" October 9, "H" October 28, "I," "K," "L" and "M" October 31, 1861. Left State for Baltimore, Md., November 18, 1861. Attached to Dix's Command to March, 1862. Banks' 5th Corps March and April, 1862. Hatch's Cavalry Brigade, Department Of the Shenandoah, to June, 1862. Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Wyndham's Cavalry Brigade, defenses of Washington, to February, 1863. Price's Independent Cavalry Brigade, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June 28, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to March, 1865. Cavalry, Army of the Shenandoah, to July, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Camp Harris, Baltimore, Md., November 18, 1861, to March 31, 1862. Ordered to join Banks in the field March 31. South Fork, Shenandoah River, April 19. New Market April 29. Port Republic May 2. Conrad's Store May 2 and 6. Report to Gen. Hatch May 3. Rockingham Furnace May 4. Near Harrisonburg May 6. New Market May 7. Columbia River Bridge May 8. Bowling Green Road near Fredericksburg May 11. Operations in the Shenandoah Valley May 15-June 17. Woodstock May 18. Front Royal May 23 (Cos. "B" and "D"). Strasburg, Middletown and Newtown May 24. Winchester May 25. Defence of Harper's Ferry May 28-30 (4 Cos.). Reconnoissance to New Market June 15. Near Culpeper Court House July 12. Liberty Mills July 17. Near Orange Court House August 2. Cedar Mountain August 9-10. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Louisa Court House August 17. Kelly's Ford August 20. Warrenton Springs August 23-24. Waterloo Bridge August 24. Centreville August 28. Groveton August 29. Lewis Ford and Bull Run August 30. Chanuntily September 1. Antietam, Md., September 17-19. Ashby's Gap September 22. Leesburg October 16. Upperville October 17. Thoroughfare Gap and Haymarket October 18. New Baltimore November 5. Cedar Hill November 5. Hopewell Gap November 8. Thoroughfare Gap November 11. Middleburg November 12. Upperville November 16. Aldie November 29. Snicker's Gap and Berryville November 30. Aldie December 18. Cub Run December 31. Frying Pan January 5, 1863. Cub Run January 5. Middleburg January 26. New Baltimore February 9. Warrenton February 10. Aldie March 4. Fairfax Court House March 9. Little River Turnpike and Chanuntily March 23. Broad Run April 1. White Plains April 28. Warrenton Junction May 3. Flemming and Shannon Cross Roads May 4. Near Fairfax Court House May 8. Marsteller's Place May 14. Greenwich May 30. Snicker's Gap June 1. Middleburg June 10. Warrenton June 19. Hanover, Pa., June 30. Hunterstown July 2. Gettysburg, Pa., July 3. Monterey Pass July 4. Smithsburg July 5. Hagerstown and Williamsport July 6. Boonsboro July 8. Hagerstown July 11-13. Falling Waters July 14. Hagerstown July 15. Ashby's Gap July 26. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Lamb's Creek September 1. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Culpeper Court House September 13. Rapidan Station September 13-14. Somerville Ford September 14. Raccoon Ford September 14-16. Kelly's Ford September 18. Madison Court House September 21. Reconnoissance across the Rapidan September 21-23. White's Ford September 21-22. Brookin's Ford September 22. Hazel River Bridge September 25. Creigerville October 8. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Russell's Ford, James City and Bethesda Church October 10. Sperryville Pike, Brandy Station and near Culpeper October 11. Gainesville October 14. New Market October 16. Groveton October 17-18. Haymarket, Gainesville and Buckland's Mills October 19. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Stevensburg November 8. Germania Ford November 18. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Morton's Ford November 26. Raccoon Ford November 26-27. Ely's Ford January 19 and 22, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Kilpatrick's Raid to Richmond February 28-March 4. Ely's Ford February 28. Beaver Dam Station and South Anna Bridge February 29. defenses of Richmond March 1. Hanovertown March 2. Aylett's and Stevensville March 2. King's and Queen's Court House March 3. Ely's Ford March 4. Field's Ford March 8. Southard's Cross Roads March 11. Rapidan Campaign May-June. Parker's Store May 5. Todd's Tavern May 5-6. Wilderness May 6-7. Germania Ford, Brock Road and the Furnaces May 7. Todd's Tavern May 7-8. Spottsylvania May 8-18. Downer's Bridge and Milford Station May 20. Mattapony River and Bowling Green May 21. North Anna River May 24. Mt. Carmel Church May 25. On line of the Pamunky May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Hanover Court House May 29. Mechump's Creek May 30. Signal Hill May 31. Ashland Station June 1. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Gaines' Mill, Totopotomoy and Salem Church June 2. Haw's Shop June 3. Old Church June 10 Shady Grove and Bethesda Church June 11. Riddell's Shop and Long Bridge June 12. White Oak Swamp June 13. Malvern Hill June 14. Smith's Store near St. Mary's Church June 15. White House Landing June 19. Wilson's Raid on South Side & Danville Railroad. June 22-30. Black and white and Nottaway Court House June 23. Staunton Bridge June 24. Roanoke Bridge June 25. Sappony Church or Stony Creek June 28. Ream's Station June 29. Before Petersburg until July 30. (A detachment of Regiment left at Dismounted Camp, participated in actions at Maryland Heights July 6-7. Rockville, Md., July 10. Tell Gate July 12. Poolesville July 15. Snicker's Ferry July 18, and Kernstown July 24.) Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Winchester and Halltown August 17. Opequan August 19. Summit Point August 21. Charlestown August 22. Duffield Station August 23. Near Kearneysville August 25. Berryville Steptember 2-4. Duffield Station September 3. Darkenville September 3. Opequan September 7-13-15 and 17. Abraham's Creek near Winchester September 13. Battle of Winchester September 19. Near Cedarville and Crooked Run September 20. Front Royal Pike and Fisher's Hill September 21. Milford September 22. New Market September 23-24. Mt. Crawford September 24. Waynesboro September 26. Port Republic September 26-27. Mr. Meridian September 27. Waynesboro and Railroad Bridge September 29. Bridgewater October 2. Brock's Gap October 6. Forestville October 7. Near Columbia Furnace October 7. Tom's Brook, "Woodstock Races," October 8-9. Back Road Cedar Creek October 13. Lebanon Church October 14. Cedar Run October 18. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Newtown and Nineyah November 12. Mr. Jackson November 22. Expedition to Lacy Springs December 19-22. Lacy Springs December 21. Woodstock January 10, 1865. Edenburg January 22. Sheridan's Raid February 27-March 3. Waynesboro March 2. Capture of Gen. Early's Command. Detached from Division to guard prisoners from Waynesboro to Winchester. Mr. Sidney and Lacy Springs March 5. New Market March 6 Rood's Hill March 7. (A portion of Regiment at Dinwlddie Court House March 30-31. Five Forks April 1. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sweet House Creek April 3. Harper's Farm April 6. Appomattox Station April 8. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army.) Regiment on duty at Headquarters Middle Military Division and in vicinity of Winchester until July. Mustered out July 19, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 93 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 222 Enlisted men by disease. Total 326.

5th New York Cavalry, "Historic Records of the Fifth New York Cavalry, First Ira Harris Guard: Its Organization, Marches, Raids, Scouts, Engagements and General Services, During the Rebellion of 1861-1865," by Louis N. Boudrye. Originally published in 1865 by S. R. Gray, Albany, New York, this book may prove hard to locate. Reprint, with 385 pages, and portraits, costs $ 39.00.

5th New York Cavalry, "War Journal of Louis N. Beaudry, Fifth New York Cavalry: The Diary of a Union Chaplain, Commencing February 16, 1863," by Louis N. Beaudry, edited by Richard E. Beaudry. From Beaudry's diary of his service with the 5th New York Cavalry, this book details events at Gettysburg. Released in 1996, 260 pages, photos, index, costs $ 32.00.

5th New York Cavalry - Company H, "The Civil War Diary of Captain James Penfield, 1863-1864, Fifth New York Cavalry, Company H,"by the Penfield Homestead Museum. "The book is based on Captain James Penfield's 1863-1864 Civil War Diary, of the 5th New York Cavalry Company H. The diary begins with winter encampment and follows Captain Penfield through the summer until July 6, 1863, when he was captured in Hagerstown, MD. He continued to keep a diary throughout his imprisonment in Southern prisons such as Libby, Camp Sorhgum, and Camp Oglethorpe. The book is hard cover with a dust jacket 285 pages. It identifies nearly 500 people, military and civilian, that Captain Penfield mentions.

The diary costs $30.00 plus $4.00 shipping and handling. Money orders preferred, but will accept checks. Sorry, no credit cards. You can order via e-mail to: Wendy Ingleston waisai@cptelco.net or The Penfield Homestead Museum, RR 1 Box 126, Crown Point, NY 12928. Or by calling Wed-Fri between the hours of 10:30 and 3:30 (518) 597-3804. The Museum's email is: penfield@cptelco.net

5th New York Cavalry - Articles from Wyoming County Newspapers and Letters from Soldiers of the Fifth New York Cavalry, 1861-1865," compiled by B. Conrad Bush. The Fifth New York was in action in Virginia from late 1861 to June 1865. The news articles and letters from the soldiers give the reader a vivid look into the soldiers lives and the actions of the 5th New York Cavalry. Contact B. Conrad Bush directly.. Price is $ 20 plus $ 1.50 shipping. 200 pages, spiral bound with index. "Conrad has elected to compile information on this valiant unit and offering his hard work for sale directly to other Civil War buffs...bypassig the traditional publishing outfits. His notebook includes a short capsule history of this unit, followed by an index of newspaper articles gleaned from this period as well as entries in unit members' diaries. As I am sure it will prove of interest to ancestors from this unit, I find it lacking of historical value as the notebook only groups and publishes newspaper article with the compiler failing to add anything to tie these reports together. Entries from diaries are the standard you would find from the typical Civil War diary.... we marched.... we camped..we slept ....it was hot... it was cold... etc. With a detailed index, descendants of this unit may find this helpful.. Others may want to pass on adding this to their Civil War libary." Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website.

6th New York Cavalry, "Reminiscences and Record of the Sixth New York Volunteer Cavalry," by Alonzo Foster. Originally published in 1892 as part of a serial in a Long Island Newspaper, this reprint of 148 pages, costs $ 29.00.

6th New York Cavalry, "History of the Sixth New York Cavalry (Second Ira Harris Guard), Second Brigade, First Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, 1861-1865," by Hillman Hall 1908. "There have been two books written on this regiment. This one is definitely the better of the two. It was written by many surviving member of the unit and is over 500 pages long. The history is very detailed! During its service it lost 472 men killed, wounded or missing. If this book is found you can expect to pay 350-400 dollars." Reviewed by Michael Nicosia, aka Woodynails@aol.com (thanks Mike).

6th New York Cavalry, "History of the Sixth New York Cavalry (Second Ira Harris Guard), Second Brigade, First Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, 1861-1865," by Hillman A. Hall, et al. Originally published in 1908 by the Blanchard Press, Worcester, Massachusetts, this book may prove difficult to locate.

7th New York Cavalry - See the 1st New York Regiment of Mounted Rifles listed above

8th New York Cavalry, aka "the Rochester Regiment"....fact..."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

8th New York Cavalry, "Deeds of Daring or History of the Eighth New York Volunteer Cavalry," by Henry Norton. Originally published in 1889, at Norwich, New York. "This is a small book that is extremely rare and expensive. There are no reprints available and if found expect to pay around $ 300 dollars if found. This regiment of New Yorkers from Rochester served with Buford. The 8th cavalry's claim to fame is that they were among the first to reach the field at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863. The book is 184 pages and is extremely rare. It suffered 794 men killed, wounded or missing. One of Fox's fighting 300. Thanks to our New York Regimental specialist, Mike Nicosia, aka Woodynails@aol.com for providing this information to me. Reprint of 185 pages, costs $ 29.00..

8th New York Cavalry Website

9th New York Cavalry, "History of the Ninth Regiment New York Volunteer Cavalry, War of 1861 to 1865," by Newel Cheney. Originally published in 1901, at Jamestown, New York. Reprint, 416 pages, with a supplement on Trevilian Station, with illustrations, complete rosters, costs $ 37.50.

9th New York Cavalry, "Saddle and Saber: The Letters of Civil War Cavalrymen Corporal Nelson Taylor," by Dr. Grey Nelson Taylor. Nelson Taylor went to war in September, 1861, and served out his 3 year enlistment, becoming a civilian again, November, 1864. He did his service with he 9th New York Cavalry, a regiment raised primarily in the western most part of the state, although he himself was originally from the Albany area. Except for the Gettysburg campaign, the 9th New York served its entire term of service in Virginia. They were present and actively engaged in many of the more famous cavalry actions, ranging from Thoroughfare Gap to Brandy Station, Yellow Tavern and for those who veteranized, on to Appomattox. And at Gettysburg, they received their first income Confederate shells. Through it all, Nelson Taylor was a regular correspondent home, and his family saved more than 100 of his letters, which his grandson collected and published in this volume. It is obvious that Dr. Taylor the grandson, undertook the publications of these letters out of familial love and respect for his ancestor. The annotations and illustrations often go to tell us more about the Taylor family than they do about the 9th Cavalry and their role in the war. Dr. Taylor also apparently ignored some obvious sources of information about the regiment. For example, although he consulted the published history of the 9th written by Newell Cheney in 1901, he does not cite the Official Records and the regimental reports, which it contains. His annotations of the letters are therefore weak at times. Corporal Taylor sent home two letters from Culpeper in August of 1862 describing the aftermath of the Battle of Cedar Mountain, where Stonewall Jackson mauled Bank's Corps of Pope's Army of Virginia, but the annotation fails to mention that the battle occurred. But the book was not meant to be a treatise of the war. Its value is in Corporal Taylor's letters themselves. A collection of letters this complete is rare and gives us both a knowledge about who Nelson Taylor was, and what he and his regiment did. His letter written on May 15, 1864 describing the clashes in the Wilderness and at Yellow Tavern is complete and detailed, giving us a nice picture of those times and events. They end with its reminiscences at the 30th Anniversary gathering at Gettysburg in 1893, where he cut hickory switches near the spot where he first fought, and listened to Dan Sickles speak at the dedicating of the New York monument. For those interested in the cavalry arm of the Army of the Potomac, these letters should be of genuine interest. (reviewed by George Bradley, for the Civil War Courier). 203 pages, 1993 release, cost $ 21.00.

9th New York Cavalry, New Articles from Wyoming County Newspapers and Diary Entries from the men of the Ninth Cavalry," by B. Conrad Bush. Learn about the lives of the men of the Ninth New York Cavalry through their correspondence home. The Ninth served from 1861 through 1865 in Virginia. Compiled by B. Conrad Bush, 100 pages with index, spiral bound. Cost $ 15 plus $ 1.50 postage. Contact B. Conrad Bush directly. "Conrad has elected to compile information on this valiant unit and offering his hard work for sale directly to other Civil War buffs...bypassing the traditional publishing outfits. His notebook includes a short capsule history of this unit, followed by an index of newspaper articles gleaned from this period as well as entries in unit members' diaries. As I am sure it will prove of interest to ancestors from this unit, I find it lacking of historical value as the notebook only groups and publishes newspaper article with the compiler failing to add anything to tie these reports together. Entries from diaries are the standard you would find from the typical Civil War diary.... we marched.... we camped..we slept ....it was hot... it was cold... etc. With a detailed index, descendants of this unit may find this helpful.. Others may want to pass on adding this to their Civil War libary." Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website.

9th New York Cavalry Website.

10th New York Cavalry, aka "the Porter Guard"....fact..."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

10th REGIMENT CAVALRY.--("PORTER GUARD.") Organized at Elmira, N. Y., September 27, 1861. Moved to Gettysburg, Pa., December 24, and duty there until March, 1862. Duty at Havre de Grace and Baltimore, Md.. Middle Department and in the Defenccs of Washington, D.C., until August, 1862 Attached to Bavard's Cavalry Brigade, Army of Virginia. August-September, 1862. Bayard's Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, June, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, to May, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Sulphur Springs, Va., August 27, 1862. Near Frying Pan August 27. Reconnoissance to Dranesville, Herndon Station and Frying Pan August 31. Near Centreville September 3. Reconnoissance to Leesburg October 16-17. Aldie and Mountsville October 31. Rappahannock Station November 1. New Baltimore November 4. Rappahannock Station November 7, 8 and 9. United States Ford November 16 (Co. "H"). Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Occoquan, Dumfries, December 19. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. Hartwood Church February 25. Rappahannock Railroad Bridge April 14. Stoneman's Raid toward Richmond April 27-May 8. Kelly's Ford April 30. Rapidan Station May 1. Louisa Court House May 2, South Anna Bridge May 3. Ashland Church May 4. Thompson's Cross Roads May 4. Brandy Station and Beverly Ford June 9. Aldie June 17. Middleburg June 18, 19 and 20. Upperville June 21. Aldie June 22. Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Fairfield, Pa., July 5. Hagerstown, Md., July 11. Boonsboro July 11-12. Near Harper's Ferry July 14. Shephardstown July 14 and 16. Halltown July 15. Near Amissville August 4. Littie Washington August 5. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Culpeper Court House September 13. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Near Warrenton October 11. Warrenton or White Sulphur Springs October 12-13. Auburn and St. Stephen's Church October 14. Catlett's Station October 15-16. Rappahannock Station October 24. Philomont November 1. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. New Hope Church November 27. Parker's Store November 29. Expedition to Luray December 21-23. Rapidan Campaign May-June, 1864. Near Chancellorsville May 4. Todd's Tavern May 5-6. Wilderness May 6-7. Todd's Tavern May 7-8. Spottsylvania May 8. Sheridan's Raid to the James River May 9-24. North Anna River May 9-10. Ground Squirrel Church and Yellow Tavern May 11. Glen Allen May 11. Fortifications of Richmond May 12. Jones Bridge May 17. Haxall's Landing May 18. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Hanovertown and Haw's Shop May 28. Old Church Tavern May 30. Cold Harbor May 31-June 1. Barker's and Gaino's MilIs June 2. Bottom's Bridge June 3. Sheridan's Trevillian Raid June 7-24. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Malvern Hill June 16. Kings and Queens Court House June 18. White House or St. Peter's Church and Black Creek or Tunstall Station June 21. Samaria Church June 24. Before Petersburg June 26, 1864, to April 2, 1865, Ream's Station June 30, 1864. Light House Point July 1. Gaines Hill July 2. Prince George Court House July 10 and 16. Lee's Mills July 12. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Malvern Hill July 28. Lee's Mills July 30. Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Gravel Hill August 14. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Weldon Railroad August 19-21. Dinwiddie Road, near Ream's Station, August 23. Ream's Station August 25. Arthur's Swamp August 29-30. Yellow Tavern September 2. Stony Creek Station September 16. Belcher's Mills September 17. Poplar Springs Church, Peeble's Farm, September 29-October 2. Vaughan Road September 30-October 1. Duncan Road October 1. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Near Prince George Court House November 2. Reconnoissance to Stony Creek November 7. Blackwater Creek November 18. Stony Creek December 1. Hicksford Raid December 6-12. Bellefield December 9-10. Jarrett's Station December 10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28- April 9. Dinwiddie Court House March 30-31. Five Forks April 1. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Payne's Cross Roads and Amelia Springs April 5. Deatonville Road and Sailor's Creek April 6. Farmville April 7. Appomattox Station April 8. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Expedition to Danville April 23-29. Moved to Washington, D. C, May. Grand Review May 23. Consolidated with 24th New York Cavalry June 17, 1865, to form 1st Regiment Provisional Cavalry.

Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 93 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 148 Enlisted men by disease. Total 251.

10th New York Cavalry, "Memorial of Frederick L. Tremain," by his father LYMAN TREMAIN. Published in 1865. This book is only 86 pages long. It doesn't really deal with the 10th Cavalry but Frederick Tremain was killed as a member of 10th cavalry. He enlisted in 7th New York heavy Artillery but was transferred out before they reached their disasters at Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor. He wanted more action and when a position on the staff of General Gregg's cavalry became available he took it. He participated in Sheridan's raid on Richmond, was at Yellow Tavern when Stuart was killed and skirmished in numerous battles. He was offered a position in the 10th New York Cavalry as Lieutenant Colonel which he accepted. He was mortally wounded at Hatcher's run and died three days later in a hospital. This is a powerful little book and if a copy is available I would buy it. Lyman tries to be impartial and does a good job of it but this is his son, and it comes through. Should cost no more than 100 dollars. Thanks to Woodynails@aol.com for supplying the info. on this book. (quite the expert on New York).

10th New York Cavalry, "History of the Tenth Regiment of Cavalry New York State Volunteers," by Noble D. Preston. Originally published in 1892 at New York, New York. "This book is truly beautiful! When it was first released it was available three different ways. 1/2 leather, 3/4 cloth and all cloth. The cloth version has a horse looking forward towards the reader and the back cover has the horse's back side. The book itself is an exhausting study of the regiment, it's campaigns and it's POW's. About 600 pages, it leaves no stone unturned. The regiment was in many of the eastern theater cavalry battles and was present at Yellow Tavern when Stuart was killed. This is a very desirable book and therefore very rare. I was lucky to get a copy of the 3/4 cloth. If found expect to pay around $ 425- $ 450 dollars." Thanks to.. Woodynails@aol.com for supplying the info. on this book. 710 pages, with illustrations, folding maps, costs $ 67.50.

 10th New York Cavalry, "72 Days at Gettsyburg: Organization of the Tenth Regiment, New York Volunteer Cavalry," by George A. Rummel, III. The "Porter Guards" as this unit was later known, trained and had winter quarters at Gettysburg. Published by White Mane, this 264 page book includes a bibliography, index and photos. Costs around $ 30.00.

 10th New York Cavalry, "The Tenth New York Cavalry at Gettsyburg, published by the 10th NY CAVALRY ASSOCIATION in 1913. "This is a great supplement to Preston's History of the 10th New York Cavalry. No doubt the book's facts are somewhat distorted through age, the memories of these veteran horsemen make it interesting reading. The 10th New York Cavalry played an important role at Gettysburg holding up part of the Confederate army long enough to move Union forces into position. There are a series of these 10th reunion books. Pay no more than 100 dollars for this title. Even though regimental histories are by far more desirable than reunion books or even memoirs for that matter, some very valuable insight can be picked through the smaller volumes, like this book." Thanks to.. Woodynails@aol.com for supplying the information and his review/comments on this book.

10th New York Cavalry, "One of the People," by Burton B. Porter. Published in 1907, and consisting of 382 pages. this book deals with the services of Burton Porter in the 10th New York Cavalry. "Porter was in California digging for gold when we heard rumblings of the war. He returned home and enlisted in the 10th NY Cavalry. His experiences in the regiment are not recited in great detail BUT he was captured and sent to various prisons as an officer. He escaped and was recaptured and re-escaped. This part of the book is about 100 pages long and is gripping. This book is more than worth the purchase because of his prison experiences. The book is not terribly expensive and there are several available on the net. Expect to pay about 100 dollars." Thanks to.. Woodynails@aol.com for supplying the information and his review/comments on this book.

10th New York Cavalry, "Civil War Campaigns of the Tenth New York Cavalry with One Soldier's Personal Correspondences," by Ron Matteson. Recently published in 2007, and consisting of 424 pages, illustrated, with maps, end-notes, bibliography, and index. this softcover book is available from the author Ron Matteson, 4625 Lewis Road, Walworth, NY 14568 for $ 29.95, plus shipping.

11th New York Cavalry, "The Story of a Cavalry Regiment - Scotts' 900 - The Regimental History of the Eleventh New York Cavalryy," by Thomas West Smith. "The book was written in 1897 and is double columned. This is an extremely rare book. Scott's 900 was recruited mostly from upstate New York and New York City and with a few members from the South Fork of Long Island. They saw action Louisiana, Mississippi and West Virginia. If found expect to pay around $400 to 450 dollars. Again, thanks to our resident New York authority.. Woodynails@aol.com for supplying the info. on this book.

12th New York Cavalry Website

15th New York Cavalry, "The Red Neck Ties, or The History of the Fifteenth New York Cavalry Volunteer Cavalry," compiled and edited by Chauncey S. Norton. Originally published in 1891, at Ithaca, New York, by the Journal, Book & Job Printing House, this regimental history is quite rare to locate. Thanks to Kevin Mandoske who has a website on the 15th listed below for providing me with this information.

15th New York Cavalry Website

19th New York Cavalry, ("The First Regiment Dragoons"). Organized at Portage, N.Y., as 130th Infantry and mustered in September 2, 1862. Left State for Suffolk, Va., September 6, 1862. Attached to Provisional Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to October, 1862. Spinola's Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to December, 1862. Gibbs' Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to January, 1863. Terry's Brigade, Peck's Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to April, 1863. Terry's Brigade, Corcoran's 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Provost Marshal General's Command, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1863. Designation of Regiment changed to 19th Cavalry August 11, 1863, and to 1st Dragoons September 10, 1863. Reserve Cavalry Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 3rd (Reserve) Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah and Army Potomac, to June, 1865.

SERVICE:--Duty at Suffolk, Va., until May, 1863. Expedition from Suffolk December 1-3, 1862. Action on the Blackwater near Franklin December 2. Reconnoissances from Suffolk to Blackwater December 23 and 28. Near. Suffolk and at Providence Church December 28. Expedition toward Blackwater January 8-10, 1863. Deserted House January 30, Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. South Quay Road, Suffolk, April 17. Suffolk April 19. Nansemond River May 3. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. South Quay Road June 12. Franklin June 14. Blackwater June 16-17. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Expedition from White House to South Anna River July 1-7. Baltimore Cross Roads July 4. Ordered to Washington, D.C. Ashby's Gap July 19. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Between Centreville and Warrenton September 22. Manassas Junction October 17. Bristoe Station October 18. Buckland Mills October 18-19. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Culpeper Court House November 20. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Barnett's Ford February 6-7. Rapidan Campaign May-June, 1864. Wilderness May 5-7. Todd's Tavern May 7-8. Spottsylvania May 8. Sheridan's Raid to James River May 9-24. Davenport Bridge, North Anna River, May 10. Yellow Tavern and Ground Squirrel Bridge May 11. Fortifications of Richmond and Meadow Bridge May 12. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Hanovertown May 27. Haw's Shop May 28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Old Church and Mattadequi Creek May 30. Cold Harbor May 31-June 6. Sheridan's Travillian Raid June 7-24. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Newark or Mallory's Ford Cross Roads June 12. White House or St. Peter's Church June 21. Black Creek or Tunstall's Station June 21. Jones' Bridge June 23. Charles City Court House June 24. Before Petersburg and Richmond June 27-July 30. Demonstration north of the James River July 27-29, Deep Bottom July 27-28. Malvern Hill July 28. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Shephardstown August 8. Near Stone Chapel, Berryville Pike, August 10. Tell Gate near White Post and Newtown August 11. Cedar Creek August 12. Cedarville August 13 and 16. Summit Point August 21. Near Kearneysville and Shephardstown August 25. Leetown and Smithfield August 28. Smithfield Crossing, Opequan Creek, August 29. Bunker Hill September 13. Sevier's Ford, Opequan Creek, September 15. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Middletown and Strasburg September 20. Fisher's Hill September 21. Near Edenburg September 23. Front Royal, Mt. Jackson, September 23-24. New Market September 24. Port Republic September 26-27. McGaugheysville September 28. Mr. Crawford October 2. Tom's Brook, "Woodstock Races," October 8-9. Hupp's Hill near Strasburg October 14. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Fisher's Hill October 20. Liberty Mills October 22. Berryville October 28. Near White Post November 1. Near Kernstown November 11. Newtown November 12. Cedar Creek November 19. Expedition from Winchester into Fauquier and Loudoun Counties November 28-December 3. Bloomfield November 29. Expedition to Gordonsville December 19-28. Liberty Mills December 21. Jack's Shop December 22. Near Gordonsville December 23. Sheridan's Raid from Winchester February 27-March 25, 1865. Occupation of Staunton March 2. Action at Waynesboro March 2. Near Charlottesville March 3. Goochland Court House March 11. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Dinwiddie Court House March 30-31. Five Forks April 1. Scott's Cross Roads April 2. Deep Creek April 3. Tabernacle Church or Beaver Pond Creek April 4. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Station April 8. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Expedition to Danville April 23-29. March to Washington, D.C., May. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 30, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 126 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 130 Enlisted men by disease, etc. Total 261.

19th New York Cavalry, "History of the First New York Dragoons," by J.R. Bowen. "This regiment is from upstate New York. They did excellent service in many of the great Cavalry battles in the east. They were also dismounted at Spotsylvania and lost heavily. The regiment was originally mustered into service as the 130th New York infantry and then had it's designation changed to the 19th New York Cavalry and finally called the first New York Dragoons. This is a rare and expensive book. Expect to pay in the 350.00 to 400.00 dollar range. New York's expert is to thank again,. Woodynails@aol.com for supplying the info. on this book.

See the capsule history of this unit (19th) under 1st dragoons above).

20th New York Cavalry Website.

21st New York Cavalry, "Sabers in the Shenandoah: The Twenty-first New York Cavalry, 1862-1866," by John C. Bonnell, Jr. The 21st New York (Griswold) Cavalry was in the thick of the Civil War in the Shenandoah Valley from January, 1863 to the end of the war, including trying to contest the area in Virginia known as "Mosby's Confederacy." Illustrated, index, originally published in 1997, this 390 page book costs $ 35.00.

21st New York Cavalry, "Tibbits Boys: The History of the Twenty-first New York Cavalry," by Thomas Reed. This is the second book on the 21st New York Cavalry, a unit of relatively little renown. The book is well put together. It contains numerous photos and is extensively footnoted. I was very impressed with the what I read from it. It is available from Amazon.com for $62.50 for the hardcover and a little cheaper for a softcover edition. The price is a little steep but if you collect New York regimental histories, well here's another one. Thanks to.. Woodynails@aol.com for supplying the info. on this book.

22nd New York Cavalry, "Historical Addresses, Reminiscenses and Roster of Survivors of the Twenty-second New York Volunteer Cavalry," by Dewitt Crumb. Originally published in 1894, the softback reprint by RSG Publishing, consists of 69 pages, and costs around $ 20.00.

25th New York Regiment of Volunteer Cavalry - Regiment organized at Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and at Hart's Island, N.Y. Harbor, and mustered in by Companies as follows: Companies "A" and "B" February 20, Companies "C" and "D" March 19, Company "E" April 14, Company "F" April 23, Company "G" April 20, Company "H" July 29, Company "I" September 18, Company "K" May 16, Company "L" October 15 and Company "M" October 20, 1864. Moved to Washington, D.C., by detachments March to October, 1864. Attached to Defenses of Washington, D.C., 22nd Army Corps. April to June, 1864. Provost Guard Army of the Potomac, to July, 1864. Defenses of Washington, D.C., 22nd Corps, to August, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to September, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, to January, 1865. Unattached, 2nd Infantry Division, Army of West Virginia, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until June, 1864. Ordered to the field and Provost duty with Army of the Potomac to July, 1864. Fort Stevens and repulse of Early's attack on Washington, July 11-12. Duty in the Defenses of Washington until August. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Toll Gate, near White Post, August 11. Cedarville, Guard Hill, or Front Royal, August 16. Winchester August 17. Opequan Creek August 18. Near Kearneysville August 25. Halltown August 26. Duffield Station August 27. Berryville September 3. Opequan Creek September 13. Sevler's Ford, Opequan Creek, September 15. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Front Royal September 23-24. Luray Valley September 24. Luray September 25. Port Republic September 26-27. Mt. Crawford October 2. Tom's Brook ("Woodstock Races") October 8-9. Near Conrad's Ferry October 22. Newtown November 12. Rude's Hill, near Mt. Jackson, November 22. White Plains November 27-28. Expedition into Faquier and Loudoun Counties November 28-December 3. Upperville November 29. Snicker's Gap November 30. Expedition to Gordonsville December 19-28. Flint Hill December 20. Jack's Shop, near Gordonsville, December 22-23. Columbia Furnace January 19 and 29, 1865. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until June. Mustered out at Hart's Island, N.Y., June 27, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 16 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 49 Enlisted men by disease. Total 66.

NEW YORK Artillery UNITS

1st New York Light Artillery, "A Diary of Battle: The Personal Journals of Charles S. Wainwright, First New York Light Artillery," by Charles S. Wainwright. Edited by Allan Nevins. 549 pages, price $ 35.00.

1st New York Light Artillery, "Four Years in the First New York Light Artillery: The Papers of David F. Ritchie," by David F. Ritchie, Major, 1st NY Light Artillery; edited by Norman Ritchie. Ritchie served first with the 14th NY Volunteers, then with Batteries "A" (The Empire Battery), "C" and "H" of the 1st New York Light Artillery. Breveted Major for heroism at Petersburg, his description of the Battle of Seven Pines is one of the best in the annals of Civil War Artillery. Published in 1997, costs $ 25.00.

1st New York Light Artillery, "No Middle Ground," by Major Thomas Ward Osborn. Published by Edmonston Publishing Company, this book captures the saga of Battery D, 1st New York "Light" Artillery through Chattanooga. Osborn's "Letters from the Field" cover battles of Williamsburg [my back yard], Seven Pines, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Chattanooga and include his observations on McClellan, Hooker, Sherman, and Grant. 224 pages, with maps, illustrations, etc., cost $ 23.00.

1st New York Light Regiment Artillery, "Company G" Organized at Elmira, N.Y., and mustered in September 24, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., October 31, 1861. Attached to Sumner's Division, Army of the Potomac, November, 1861, to March, 1862. Richardson's 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. Unattached, Artillery Reserve, 5th Army Corps, to June, 1862. Reserve Artillery, 2nd Army Corps, to November, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1863. 1st Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1863. Artillery Brigade, 2nd Army Corps, to September, 1864. Artillery Reserve, attached to 2nd Army Corps, to January, 1865. Artillery Reserve, attached to 9th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Camp Barry, defenses of Washington, D.C., November, 1861, to March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15, 1862. Operations on Orange & Alexandria Railroad March 28-31. Bealeton Station March 28. Warrenton Junction March 29. Rappahannock Station March 29. Moved to the Virginia Peninsula April 3. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Fair Oaks June 27. Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centreville August 15-30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 22-October 29. Reconnoissance to Leesburg October 1-2. Leesburg October 1. Reconnoissance to Charlestown October 16-17. Advance up Loudoun Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Snicker's Gap November 2. Falmouth November 17, Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. On line of the Rappahannock and Rapidan until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Auburn and Bristoe Station October 14. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. At Stevensburg until May, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. "Bloody Angle," Assault on the Salient, May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Hanover Court House May 30. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, August 14-18. Fort Steadman March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Moved to Washington May. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 19, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Officer and 11 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 16 Enlisted men by disease. Total 30.

1st New York Artillery, Company "K" Website.

1st New York Independent Artillery, "Hurrah for the Ould Flag - The First Independent Battery at Gettysburg, by R. L. Murray. "This is a new release and is a small paperback. It's the history of Cowan's battery at Gettysburg. Interesting reading that would take a few hours to complete. Sells for about $12.00." Reviewed by Michael Nicosia, aka Woodynails@aol.com

2nd New York Light Artillery, "The Flushing Battery, Battery L, Second New York Artillery," by Brevet Major Jacob Roemer. Originally published in 1897, this "is an excellent book on life in the Artillery. A must if found. THIS, TO MY KNOWLEDGE, IS THE ONLY NEW YORK UNIT PRESENT AT VICKSBURG. Expect to pay about 200 dollars for this book. Thanks to Michael Nicosia, at Woodynails@aol.com for forwarding this info. to me.

2nd New York Heavy Artillery Regiment: Organized at Staten Island, N.Y., and mustered in by Companies as follows: Companies "C" and "D" September 18, Company "B" August 23, Companies "A" and "E" October 2, Companies "F," "G" and "H" October 15, Company "L" November 18, Companies "I" and "K" December 11 and Company "M" December 12, 1861. Eight Companies left State for Washington, D. C., November 7, 1861. Company "L" left December 2, and Companies "I," "K" and "M" December 12, 1861. Attached to Military District of Washington, D.C., December, 1861, to May, 1862. Sturgis' Command, Military District of Washington, to January, 1863. Artillery, District of Alexandria, Va., to February, 1863. Artillery, District of Alexandria, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. 1st Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. Tyler's Heavy Artillery Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, May 16-29, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to September, 1865. (Battery "L" detached March, 1862, and designated 34th New York Independent Battery November, 1863. See 34th Battery for history.)

SERVICE--Duty in the defenses of Washington until May, 1864. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August. 1862. Action at Bull Run Bridge, Va., August 27. Battle of Bull Run, Va., August 29-30. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field May 15, 1864. Rapidan Campaign May-June. Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 18-21. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Assault at Cold Harbor June 3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1864. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Reconnoissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Hatcher's Run December 9. Dabney's Mills, Hateher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. On line of Hatcher's and Gravelly Runs March 29-30. Hatcher's Run or Boydton Road March 31. White Oak Road March 31. Sutherland Station and fall of Petersburg April 2. Amelia Springs April 5. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D.C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington, D.C., until September. Mustered out at Washington, D.C., September 29, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 10 Officers and 204 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 247 Enlisted men by disease. Total 461.

3rd New York Artillery, "Cayuga in the Field," by Henry Hall and James Hall. "This is actually two different books binded together and interestingly enough, it was originally published in 1873 that way. The first book is a record of the 19th New York Volunteers and all the batteries of the 3rd New York Artillery and is 316 pages long. The 2nd book is a record of the 75th New York Volunteer Infantry and is 270 pages long. I have a reprint of this because whenever I found an original, it was in poor condition. The reprint cost about 35 dollars while the original can cost up 300 dollars depending on the condition." Again thanks to Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com for his special expertise in New York Regimentals and forwarding this info. to me for use on my website.

4th New York Heavy Artillery, "A History of the 4th New York Heavy Artillery," by Hyland C. Kirk. Originally published in 1890. This regiment came mostly from New York City and like many of the New York heavy Artillery units, it had a high casualty list. This is a thick book and if found expect to pay around 300 dollars. Thanks, Mike Nicosia, Woodynails@aol.com , our New York Corresondant!

4th New York Independent Battery, "A Famous Battery and its Campaigns 1861-1864, Fourth New Independent Battery," by James E. Smith, Washington, DC. Originally published in 1892 this book may prove hard to find. This book has a brief history of the Forth New York Battery and what it did as well as a biography on the career of Corporal James Tanner, a member of the unit. This battery was recruited in NewYork City as Company L Artillery, Serrell's Engineers and part of the 1st troop Washington Greys. It saw action on the Virginia Peninsula, also at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, losing 27 men killed, wounded or missing. It's a small book of 200 pages. Expect to pay around $ 200 dollars if found. (Again, thanks to and reviewed by Michael Nicosia, aka Woodynails@aol.com (thanks Mike).

5th New York Regiment Heavy Artillery ("2nd Regiment "Jackson Heavy"). Organized by consolidation of Jackson Heavy as Companies "E," "F," "G" and "H" and 2nd Jackson Heavy as Companies "A," "B," "C" and "D" March 6, 1862. 6th Battalion Heavy Artillery (3rd Battalion Black River Heavy Artillery) assigned as Companies "I," "K," "L" and "M" December 31, 1862. First 8 Companies served as garrison in New York Harbor at Forts Hamilton, LaFayette, Wood, Gibson, Richmond and Schuyler, March 11 to May 27, 1862. Moved to Baltimore, Md., May 27 and duty there until April 19, 1864. Companies "A" and "F" detached at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., June 19 to September 15, 1862, participating in actions at Point of Rocks and Berlin September 4-5 (Company "A"). Point of Rocks September 7 (Co. "A"). Defence of Harper's Ferry September 12-15. Maryland Heights September 12-13. Bolivar Heights September 14. Surrendered September 15. Paroled September 16, and rejoined Regiment at Baltimore. Regiment attached to defenses of Baltimore, Md. 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, May, 1862, to February, 1863. Morris' Brigade, 8th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 2nd Separate Brigade, 8th Army Corps, to April, 1864. 3rd Battalion (Cos. "I," "K," "L" and "M" on duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., north and south of the Potomac, 22nd Army Corps, December 31, 1862, to November 24, 1863; then at Harper's Ferry, Reserve Division, Dept. of West Virginia, to October, 1864. 1st Battalion, attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Army of West Virginia, April 19 to July 29. 1864, participating In Sigel's Expedition from Martinsburg to New Market April 29-May 16. Battle of New Market May 15. Hunter's Raid on Lynchburg, Va., May 26-July 1. Piedmont June 5 Occupation of Staunton June 6. Diamond Hill June 17. Lynchburg June 17-18. Liberty June 19. Salem June 21. Operations about Harper's Ferry July 4-7. snicker's Ferry July 17-18. Kernstown, Winchester, July 24. Martinsburg July 25. Duty at Harper's Ferry until October. 2nd Battalion attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Army of West Virginia. July 29 to October 28, 1864, participating in Sheridan's Campaign in the Shenandoah Valley, August to October. Cedar Creek August 12. Charlestown August 21. Halltown August 23. Berryville September 3. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Cedar Creek October 13. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. At Harper's Ferry until October 29. Regiment on duty in the Shenandoah Valley and in District of Harper's Ferry, W. Va., October, 1864, to July. 1865. Attached to 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of West Virginia, January to April, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, West Virginia, to June, 1865. District of Harper's Ferry to July, 1865. 3rd Battalion mustered out July 24, 1865. Regiment mustered out July 19, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 90 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 295 Enlisted men by disease. Total 386.

5th Battalion Heavy Artillery ("2nd Battalion Black River Artillery"). Organized at Sackett's Harbor, N.Y., and mustered in September 11, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., September 18, 1862. Transferred to 10th New York Heavy Artillery as Companies "A," "C," "F" and "G" December 31, 1862.

6th REGIMENT HEAVY Artillery ("ANTHONY WAYNE GUARD"). Organized at Yonkers, N.Y., as the 135th Regiment Infantry, and mustered In September 2, 1862. Designation changed October 3, 1862. Left State for Baltimore, Md., September 5, 1862. Attached to Defenses of Baltimore, Md., 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to January, 1863. Defenses. Upper Potomac, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 8th Army Corps, to June, 1863. 3rd Provisional Brigade, French's Division, 8th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, to August, 1863. Artillery Reserve and Headquarters and ammunition train guard, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to May 13, 1864. Kitching's Heavy Artillery Brigade, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 30, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to June 2, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to August, 1864. 1st Brigade, Hardin's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to September, 1864. 1st Brigade, Kitching's Provisional Division, Middle Military Division, September 27 to December 3, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Provisional Division, Army of the James, and 2nd Brigade, Infantry Division, Defenses of Bermuda Hundred, Army of the James, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, Ferrero's Division, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1865. Sub-District of Roanoke, District of the Nottaway, Dept. of Virginia, to August, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md., to December, 1862. Companies "B," "E," "F," "I," "L" and "M"). Companies "A," "C," "D," "G," "H" and "K" at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., December, 1862. Duty on the Upper Potomac until July, 1863. Pursuit of Lee July. Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. Ammunition train guard for Army of the Potomac until April, 1864. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22, 1863. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26- December 2. Rapidan Campaign May-June, 1864. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Harris Farm (or Fredericksburg Road) May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16-July 9. Ordered to Washington, D.C., and duty in the Defenses of that city until September. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign September to December. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Bermuda Hundred, Va., and duty in the Defenses at that point until March, 1865. Fort Brady January 24, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Duty in the Sub-District of Roanoke, District of the Nottaway, Dept. of Virginia, until June, and at Petersburg, Va., until August. Mustered out near Washington, D.C., August 24, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 130 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 6 Officers and 275 Enlisted men by disease. Total 417.

6th BATTALION HEAVY Artillery - ("3rd BATTALION BLACK RIVER Artillery"). Organized at Sackett's Harbor, N.Y., and mustered in September 11, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., September 20, 1862. Duty in the Defenses of that city until December 1862. Transferred to 5th New York Heavy Artillery December 31, 1862, as Companies "I," "K," "L" and "M." (See 5th New York Heavy Artillery.)

7th New York Heavy Artillery....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

7th New York Regiment of Heavy Artillery - "Albany County Regiment," "The Seymour Guard" - Organized at Albany, N.Y., as the 113th Regiment, N.Y. Infantry, and mustered in August 18, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 18, 1862. Attached to Defenses north of the Potomac September, 1862, to February, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Haskin's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to May, 1864. Tyler's Heavy Artillery Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, May 18-29, 1864. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to November 23, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to February 22, 1865. Defenses of Baltimore, Md., 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to August, 1865.

SERVICE--Garrison duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until May 15. 1864. Ordered to Join Army of the Potomac in the field May 15, 1864. Rapidan Campaign May-June. Spotsylvania Court House May 17-21. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to February 22, 1865. Weldon Railroad June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Hatcher's Run October 27-28. Reconnoissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Ordered to Baltimore, Md., February 22, and garrison duty there until August. Mustered out August 1, 1865, and honorably discharged from service.

Regiment lost during service 14 Officers and 277 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 374 Enlisted men by disease. Total 669.

7th New York Regiment of Heavy Artillery - "Carnival of Blood" - The Civil War Ordeal of the 7th New York Heavy Artillery," by Robert Keating. Published in 1998, and part of the Army of the Potomac series from Butternut and Blue. This unit served garrison duty in Washington, D.C., until May, 1864 when it was transferred to the Army of the Potomac. It joined the hard fighting Francis C. Barlow's division of the Second Army Corps. The unit saw fierce fighting at Spotsylvania and served through the Petersburg campaign. It suffered an amazing 1,259 men killed, wounded or missing. Reading the Regimental Roster is SCARY! A must for all. It costs 40 dollars. One of Fox's fighting 300. "This is one of the best regimentals I've ever read! I could not put the book down once I started. In fact, I even missed my train stop because I got too engrossed, not kidding either. I don't usually read the roster in great detail, but on this one I read ever one. IT'S SCARY. Reviewed by Michael Nicosia, aka Woodynails@aol.com (thanks Mike).

8th New York Heavy Artillery....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

8th New York Regiment of Heavy Artillery: Organized at Lockport, N.Y., as the 129th Regiment Infantry, and mustered in August 22, 1862. Left State for Baltimore, Md., August 23, 1862. Designation changed October 19, 1862. Attached to defenses of Baltimore, Md., 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to January, 1863. 2nd Separate Brigade, 8th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Maryland Heights Division, Army of West Virginia, to August, 1863. 2nd Separate Brigade, 8th Army Corps, to May, 1864. Tylet's Heavy Artillery Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, May 15-29, 1864. 4th Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June 26, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Garrison duty at Forts Federal Hill, Marshall and McHenry, defenses of Baltimore, Md. (except from July 10 to August 3, 1863, at Maryland Heights, and a few days in February, 1864, at Green Springs Run and Romney), until May 12, 1864. Ordered to Join Army of the Potomac in the field May 12, 1864. (Cos, "L" and "M" Join Regiment at Baltimore February, 1864.) Rapidan Campaign May-June, 1864. Spottsylvania Court House May 17-21. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Watkin's House March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D.C., May 2-12, Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 5, 1865. Veterans and Recruits of Companies "G," "H," "I" and "K" transferred to 4th New York Heavy Artillery; those of Companies "A," "B," "C," "D," "E" and "F" to 10th New York Heavy Artillery.
Regiment lost during service 19 Officers and 342 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 298 Enlisted men by disease. Total 663.

8th New York Regiment of Heavy Artillery - "Full Measure of Devotion - 8th Heavy Artillery, 2 volumes, by Wilbur Russel Dunn. "Even though this is a 2 volume set, it is paperback and only $30.00. This book goes into great detail about the service of this regiment. It pretty much mirrors the 7th heavy book by Keating. I found numerous copies available in Gettysburg. One of Fox's fighting 300. Reviewed by Michael Nicosia, aka Woodynails@aol.com

9th New York Heavy Artillery....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

9th New York Regiment of Heavy Artillery- ("2nd Auburn Regiment"Cayuga and Wayne Country Regiment") Organized at Auburn, N.Y., as the 138th Regiment New York Infantry and mustered in September 8, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., September 12, 1862. Designation changed to 9th Heavy Artillery December 9, 1862. 22nd New York Battery assigned to Regiment as Company "M" February 5, 1863. Company "L" organized at Albany, N.Y., and mustered in December 4, 1863. Regiment attached to 1st Brigade, defenses of Washington, D.C., north of the Potomac to December, 1862. 2nd Brigade, defenses North of the Potomac, to February, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to June, 1865. (2nd Battalion detached with Artillery Brigade, 6th Army Corps, May 31 to July 10, 1864. 1st Brigade, Hardin's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to September 23, 1864. Keim's Provisional Brigade to October 3, 1864; then rejoined Regiment.) 1st Brigade, Hardin's Division; 22nd Army corps, to june, 1865.

SERVICE--Garrison duty n the defenses of Washington, D.C., until May, 1864, during which time built and garrisoned Forts Mansfield, Bayard, Gaines and Foote. Relieved from garrison duty and ordered to Join Army of the Potomac in the field May 18, 1864. Rapidan Campaign May-June. North Anna River May 26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 18-19. Siege of Petersburg June 18-July 6. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23. Moved to Baltimore, Md., July 6-8. Battle of Monocacy, Md., July 9. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Near Charlestown August 21-22, Charlestown August 29. Battle of Winchester September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty at Kernstown until December. Moved to Washington, D.C., December 3; then to Petersburg, Va. Siege of Petersburg, Va., December, 1864, to April, 1865. Fort Fisher, Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Amelia Springs April 5. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Expedition to Danville April 17-27. Duty there and at Richmond until June. Moved to Washington, D.C. Corps Review June 8. Consolidated to four Companies June 27, 1865, and transferred to 2nd New York Heavy Artillery.

Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 198 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 254 Enlisted men by disease. Total 461.

9th New York Heavy Artillery, "History of the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery," by Alfred S. Roe. Originally published in 1899, at Worcester, Massachusetts. 615 pages, with illustrations, costs $ 57.00.

10th REGIMENT HEAVY Artillery.--("BLACK RIVER Artillery." "JEFFERSON COUNTY REGIMENT.") Organized by consolidation of 4th, 5th and 7th Battalions of Black River Artillery December 31, 1862. Companies A,B,C,D,E,F,G and M were originally organized at Sackett's Harbor, N.Y., and mustered in September 11, 1862. Companies "H" and "I" organized at same place and mustered in September 12, 1862. Company "K" organized at Staten Island, N.Y., November 12, 1862. Company "L" at Fort Schuyler, N.Y., December 27, 1862. Companies A,C,F,G,H,I,K and L left New York State for Washington, D.C., September 18, 1862. Companies "B," "D," "E" and "M" on duty at Fort Richmond and Sandy Hook, New York Harbor, September, 1862, to June, 1863; then Joined Regiment at Washington, D.C. Regiment attached to 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, Defenses of Washington, D.C., to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Army Corps, Army of the James, June 5-24, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Army Corps, to August, 1864. 1st Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Kitching's Provisional Division, Middle Military Division, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Provisional Division, Defenses of Bermuda Hundred, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1865. 2nd Brigade, Ferrero's Division, Army of the James, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, Ferrero's Division, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1865. District of the Nottaway, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Garrison duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until May, 1864. Ordered to Join Army of the Potomac in the field May 27. Cold Harbor, Va., June 5-12. Before Petersburg June 15-19. Siege of Petersburg June 16 to August 15. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Moved to Washington, D.C., August 15, and duty there until September 27. Ordered to the Shenandoah Valley September 27. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Washington, D.C., then to Bermuda Hundred, Va., and duty in the Defenses at that point until March, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Duty in the Dept. of Virginia until June. Mustered out at Petersburg, Va., June 23, 1865. Recruits transferred to 6th New York Heavy Artillery.

Regiment lost during service 47 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 218 Enlisted men by disease. Total 267.

13th New York Regiment of Heavy Artillery
: Organized at New York and mustered in at Elmira, N.Y., by Companies as follows: "A" August 12, 1863. "B" August 29. "C" September 11. "D" at Staten Island, N.Y., August 4, 1863. "E" at Fort Schuyler March 10, 1864. "F" February, 1864. "G" March 14. "H" February 18. "I" at Rlcker's Island November 10, 1863. "K" at Norfolk, Va., February 21, 1864. "L" June 11, 1864. "M" December, 1863. Companies "A," "B," "C," "D" left State for Norfolk, Va., October 5, 1863. Attached to defenses of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., and defenses of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina (1st and 2nd Battalions). 3rd Battalion (Cos. "I," "K," "L," "M") attached to Naval Brigade as guard on board vessels of war along Atlantic Coast and with James River fleet as Naval Brigade, Army of the James, Companies "A" and "H" attached to 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, May, 1864, to January, 1865, and to defenses of Bermuda Hundred, Va., to June, 1865, participating in Butler's operations on south side of the James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28, 1864. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Fall of Petersburg April 2, 1865. (Co. "D" at Fort Fisher, N. C., January 15, 1865.) Expedition from Suffolk to Murfree's Depot, N. C., March 10-11, 1865 (Detachment). South Quay March 10. Expedition from Deep Bottom to near Weldon, N. C., March 28-April 11, 1865 (Detachment). Old members and Companies "I," "K," "L" and "M" mustered out June 28, 1865. Balance transferred to 6th New York Heavy Artillery July 18, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 4 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 144 Enlisted men by disease. Total 151.

13th New York Artillery, "Loyal until Death: A Diary of the Thirtheenth New York Artillery," by Guy Breshears. Originally published in 2003, by Heritage, "this book gathers the orders, reports, memos, personal letters, and other documents received by the officers of this unitwhich served throughout the war and participated at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Atlanta, and many other major battles, including the important letters of Captain William Wheeler, hitherto available only in a privately published collection." This 486 page softback book, costs around $ 37.00.

13th New York State Militia Heavy Artillery: Organized at Suffolk, Va., for three months, May 28, 1862. Mustered out September 28, 1862.

14th New York Heavy Artillery....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."

14th New York Heavy Artillery: Organized at Rochester, N.Y., and mustered in by Companies as follows: Companies "A" and "B" August 29, Company "C" September 11, Company "D" September 12, Company "E" October 18, Company "F" October 20, Companies "G" and "H" December 7, Companies "I" and "K" December 21, 1863; Company "L" January 8, and Company "M" at Elmira, N.Y., January 17, 1864. Companies "A," "B," "C," "D," "E" and "F" ordered to New York October 13, 1863, and assigned to garrison duty in New York Harbor until April 23, 1864. Companies "G" and "H" ordered to Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, December 8, 1863. Companies "I" and "K" to Fort Richmond, New York Harbor, December 24, 1863. Companies "L" and "M" to Fort Richmond January, 1864, and duty at these points until April 23, 1864. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field April 23, 1864. Attached to Provisional Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, to June 1, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, Hardin's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, D.C., to August, 1865.

SERVICE--Rapidan Campaign May-June, 1864. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. North Anna River May 23-26, Line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864. Weldon Railroad August 18-21. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Reconnoissance on Vaughan and Squirrel Level Roads October 8. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Fort Stedman March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Occupation of Petersburg April 3. Moved to South Side Railroad and duty at Ford's Station until April 20. Moved to Washington, D.C., April 20-27, and duty there until August. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out August 26, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 220 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 299 Enlisted men by disease. Total 527.

15th REGIMENT HEAVY NEW YORK Artillery - Originally organized as 3rd Battalion German Heavy Artillery at New York City October to December, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., December 19, 1861. Attached to Defenses of Washington to March, 1862. Artillery Brigade, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. Whipple's Command, Military District of Washington, to July, 1862. Fort Lyon, Defenses of Washington, to February, 1863. Tyler's Command, De Russy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to October, 1863. Designation of Regiment changed to 15th New York Heavy Artillery September 30, 1863, and 3rd Battalion assigned as Companies A,B,C,D and E 4th Brigade, De Russy's Division, 22nd Army Corps. to February, 1864. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1864. Kitching's Independent Brigade, 5th Army Corps, May, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, May 30-June 2, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to August, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to May, 1865. 4th Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to August, 1865. (Co. "F" attached to Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, June to December, 1864. Company "M" to Artillery Brigade, 5th Army Corps, January to June, 1865.)

SERVICE--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until April, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May-June. Battle of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Harris Farm (or Fredericksburg Road) May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Mills May 23. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Weldon Railroad June 22-23, 1864. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Six-Mile House, Weldon Railroad, August 18-21. Poplar Springs Church, Peeble's Farm, September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run October 27-28. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Gravelly Run March 29. Boydton Road and White Oak Road March 31. Five Forks April 1. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D.C., May. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington until August. Mustered out August 22, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 142 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 225 Enlisted men by disease. Total 380.

15th New York Heavy Artillery Website

16th REGIMENT NEW YORK HEAVY Artillery. Companies organized and mustered in as follows: Companies "A" and "B" at Albany, N.Y., September 28, 1863. Left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., October 14, 1863. Company "C" October 21, and left State for Fortress Monroe, October 22, 1863. Company "D" December 7, and left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., October 8, 1863. Company "E" at Riker's Island, N.Y., December 16, 1863, and left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., December 16, 1863. Company "G" at Riker's Island January 9, and left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., January 13, 1864. Company "F" at Elmira January 19. Company "H" February 8, 1864. Company "I" January 28. Company "K" February 2. Companies "L" and "M" at Auburn January 26, 1864. All moved to Fortress Monroe, Va. Regiment on duty at Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Gloucester Point, Va., until June,, 1864, as Heavy Artillery and Infantry. Companies "E" and "H" attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James, July to December, 1864; then to Separate Brigade at Fort Pocahontas until June, 1865. Companies A,B,C,F,G,K and M attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James. July 27 to December 3, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 24th Army Corps, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to July, 1865. Company "L" attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps, to December, 1864; then to Artillery Brigade, 24th Army Corps, to July, 1865. 3rd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to August, 1865.

SERVICE--Engagement between White House and Army of the James while laying Army telegraph lines May 29, 1864. Action at West Point, Va., June 20 (Companies D,E,H,I,L and M). Gloucester Point June 23. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond July 27, 1861, to January 3, 1865. Dutch Gap Canal August 8-19. Signal Hill August 13. Action at Dutch Gap Canal August 16 (Detachment). Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Charles City Cross Roads October 1. Darbytown and New Market Roads October 7. Darbytown Road October 13. Fair Oaks October 27-28. In trenches north of the James River until January, 1865. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 4-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Cape Fear Intrenchments February 11-13. Fort Anderson February 18-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Near Wilmington February 22-23. Duty at Wilmington, Smithville and Goldsburg, N. C., until July. Regiment concentrated at Washington, D.C., July, and duty there until August. Mustered out August 21, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 42 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 284 Enlisted men by disease. Total 328.

16th New York Artillery, Companies "F" and "H" Website.

Read about Jacob Guller, of Battery F, 16th New York Artillery, (as owned by Ronald A. Mosocco, owner of this website for your personal viewing only!)

17th NEW YORK INDEPENDENT BATTERY LIGHT Artillery ("ORLEANS BATTERY"): Organized at Lockport, N.Y., and mustered in August 26, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 28. Attached to Military District of Washington to October, 1862. Abercrombie's Division, Defense of Washington, to February, 1863. Abercrombie's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. Camp Barry, 22nd Army Corps, to July, 1863. Artillery, King's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to March, 1864. Camp Barry, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to July, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 18th Army Corps, Army of the James, to December, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 24th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE--Duty at Artillery Camp of Instruction and in the Defense of Washington, D.C., September, 1862, to July, 1864. Ordered to Join Army of the James in the field at Petersburg, Va. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond July 6, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30, 1864. Duty on north side of the James River before Richmond until March, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9, Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Rice's Station April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Duty in the Dept. of Virginia until June. Mustered out June 12, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Enlisted man killed and 16 Enlisted men by disease. Total 17.

"Hard Breathing Days - The Civil War Letters of Cora Beach Benton, Albion, New York - 1862-1865," transcribed and researched by Thomas R. Taber. "From the moment I unwrapped my review copy, I became enthralled in this book. I was taken aback by the monumental effort Mr. Taber has exerted in bringing to market such a fine and exceptionally well researched and organized story of the homefront "back home."

The author was able to obtain in July, 1997 approximately 160 letters written from September 1862 to June 1865 by Cora Beach Benton to her husband "Charlie." [Also included are several additional letters Tom was able to obtain that were believed to had been lost forever "to the ages." I am sure Tom was estactic when these letters were uncovered!]

Oliver Charles "Charlie" Benton enlisted in the 17th New York Volunteer Independent Light Artillery, August, 1862, returning home for good (between various short furloughs) on Friday, June 16th, 1865, after his battery was mustered out of service at Richmond, Va on June 12, 1865. Physically intact, it was Cora who wrote encouraging and challenging Charlie's mental fitness to "see this thing through."

The uniquess of this book is that Charlie kept all these letters that Cora wrote. This is quite extraordinary as it was normally the other way around where the soldier in the field wrote home about his experiences; the wife or mother cherishing those letters written from the field. We must thank Charlie for saving all these letters he received from home for us and future generations to enjoy and appreciate.

These letters are unique enough but are full of information to be able to fill up a 501 page hardback book!

Included in the author's outstanding research is a street map of Civil War Albion, New York, which designates such detailed analysis as to where relatives lived, the streets where Churches, stores, etc. that are all talked about throughout the book. He has dutifully included numerous photos, many of members of the valiant 17th Independent Battery. Included is a bibliography, an unbelievable 24 page index and glossary of numerous individuals and THEIR Story whether they fought with the 17th or were from Albion, NY, or where relatives, friends, important folks from Albion, NY, etc. I found this in itself worthy to buy this book! Coupled with another 8 pages of Biographical Sketches of members of the 17th New York Light Artillery, as well as a fascinating epilogue of one of their sons, George W. Benton make this book superb!

If you are interested in this book, bear in mind that this is not a regimental history.

But Mr. Taber has raised the bar in Civil War books coming to print. Like so many before who simply purchase a Civil War collection and publish them, Tom has 'gone the distance,' done his homework, and made this a truly worthwhile addition to your Civil War libary - add this book to your collection as it brings home how a wife of a regular solider felt and wrote to her husband. You will come to know Cora [and her sister wives of the American Civil War] and how everyday life was - from enjoyment to sorrow - back home. You will be taken aback by Cora's personality - quite strong and independent and not afraid to put her thoughts to pen, as she has to deal with raising and tending to her family, death [and marriages and births] of friends, relatives and neighbors, etc. as well as their home while her husband is off fighting to preserve the Union. Without knowing if Charlie would return, laying her head down at the end of the day, but having the strength to write regularly to her distant loved one with an upper stiff lip.

I usually limit my review to concise unbiased summarazation. This review has exceeded the norm. But then again, this book goes past the norm. Buy Tom's book!

ISBN 0-9726766-0, published by Almeron Press, 344 West State Street, Albion, NY 14411. Cost of this 500 plus page bardback book is $ 36.00 With only 700 copies from this first edition, buy yours now, before they are all gone! You can contact the author directly now at Tom Taber."Reviewed by Ronald A. Mosocco, the owner of this website.

24th NEW YORK INDEPENDENT BATTERY LIGHT Artillery, by Jullian Wheaton, New York, 1870, 335 pages, reprint by B. Conrad Bush, 2000, listed in Dornbusch 1, history of a Rocket Battalion turned into a Lt. Artillery Battery, service in Va. and NC, captured at Plymouth, NC, battery losing 67 of 110 at Andersonvill and other prisons, with addition of two articls from members of battery re escape from prison and author's letter re a visit to Andersonville in 1870. Contact Bushresear@aol.com for price and availability.

24th NEW YORK INDEPENDENT BATTERY LIGHT Artillery, "Records of the Twenty-fourth Independent Battery, New York Light Artillery, N.S.V.," by J. W. Merrill. Originally published in 1870, at Perry, New York, an original copy may be hard to find. 302 pages, will illustrations, costs $ 35.00.

24th New York Independent Battery Light Artillery Website

27th NEW YORK INDEPENDENT BATTERY LIGHT Artillery. ("BUFFALO LIGHT Artillery." "EATON'S BATTERY.") Organized at Buffalo, N.Y., and mustered in December 17, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., December 22, 1862. Attached to defenses of Washington, D. C., and 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to July, 1863. Philadelphia, Pa., Dept. of the Susquehanna, to January, 1864. Camp Barry, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, D.C., to April, 1864. Artillery Reserve, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 16, 1864. Defenses of Washington, D.C., 22nd Army Corps, to June 5, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 9th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE:--Duty at Artillery Camp of Instruction and in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until July, 1863. At Philadelphia, Pa., until January, 1864. At Washington, D.C., until April, 1864. Rapidan Campaign May, 1864. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-16. At Washington, D.C., until June 5. Before Petersburg, Va., June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864. Fort Stedman March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault and fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Moved to Washington, D.C., April 21-27. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 22, 1865.

Battery lost during Service 2 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 17 Enlisted men by disease. Total 19.


 

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